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Law Courses Catalog

Environmental Law Advocacy (was Environmental and Animal Law Advocacy)

NOTE: This course description is new for the 2016-2017 academic year. You may read the prior course description immediately below this new one. 

2016-2017

This class centers on a moot court experience, but includes more than that. During the first four or five weeks, each student will write a brief on an environmental problem. There will also be classroom sessions focusing on both brief-writing and oral advocacy. Over approximately the next three weeks, the students will engage in six rounds of argument. The first three of these arguments are practice rounds and the next three are competition rounds.

After the six rounds of argument are over, the top three advocates (based on both the brief and the arguments) will be offered the chance to participate on our national team for the Pace Environmental Moot Court Competition. We also will name alternates. From that point forward, the students who are on the Pace team collectively will write a brief (due around Thanksgiving) for the Pace competition (the oral-advocacy part of the Pace competition happens during the spring semester). Everyone else will rewrite the brief they wrote for the in-school competition, based on the comments they have received both on the brief they first submitted and during the course of the practice and competition rounds.

This course is graded. Students who re-write their briefs can use those re-written briefs to satisfy either one of our upper-level writing requirements.

Students who participate on the Pace team will likely have the opportunity to participate in the third annual Lewis & Clark Environmental Environmental Advocate of the Year competition, after the Pace competition. In our first two years, we have had stellar federal judges involved in this competition, including, in 2013, Chief Justice John Roberts of the United States Supreme Court. The judges for 2017 are yet to be determined.

No applications are necessary for this course.

NOTE: The below course description applied prior to the 2016-2017 academic year.

This class centers on a moot court experience, but includes more than that. During the first four or five weeks, each student will write a brief on an environmental problem. There will also be classroom sessions focusing on both brief-writing and oral advocacy. Over approximately the next three weeks, the students will engage in six rounds of argument. The first three of these arguments are practice rounds and the next three are competition rounds.

After the six rounds of argument are over, the top three advocates (based on both the brief and the arguments) will be offered the chance to participate on our national team for the Pace Environmental Moot Court Competition. The next four will be offered spots on one of our two national teams for the Animal Law Moot Court Competition, which takes place entirely in spring semester (or on the Pace team, should any of the students chosen for that team choose not to participate). We also will name alternates. From that point forward, the students who are on the Pace team collectively will write a brief (due around Thanksgiving) for the Pace competition (the oral-advocacy part of the Pace competition happens during the spring semester). And the students for the two animal law teams will then write team briefs for that competition, which are typically due in January (the oral-advocacy part of this competition is also typically in February). Everyone else will rewrite the brief they wrote for the in-school competition, based on the comments they have received both on the brief they first submitted and during the course of the practice and competition rounds.

This course is graded. Students who re-write their briefs can use those re-written briefs to satisfy either one of our upper-level writing requirements.

Students who participate on the Pace team will likely have the opportunity to participate in the third annual Lewis & Clark Environmental Environmental Advocate of the Year competition, after the Pace competition. In our first two years, we have had stellar federal judges involved in this competition, including, in 2013, Chief Justice John Roberts of the United States Supreme Court. The judges for 2017 are yet to be determined.

Applications are necessary for this course. Students who are interested should submit a letter of interest, their transcript (as it stands at the time), and a 10-page writing sample (it can be a portion of a brief or paper) to Professor Craig Johnston (craigj@lclark.edu), by May 13, 2016.