School navigation

Law Courses Catalog

Graduate LLM Seminar I

Graduate LLM Environmental Law Seminar I

This seminar is a two semester requirement for LL.M. students, staffed by the environmental/natural resources faculty and staff and annual Distinguished Environmental Law Scholar.  As part of the seminar, each student prepares a paper on an environmental or natural resources topic of his/her choice.  During the fall semester, faculty and guests lead discussions on environmental and natural resources topics of interest to the group, such as new case law, emerging trends, current events, theories of environmental policy, or faculty works in progress.  During the spring semester, students make individual presentations on their papers. (Students who begin the program or seminar in the spring will do their paper presentation in the following fall semester).

The seminar schedule and format may vary from year to year.  In general, it will meet for two hours every other week in the fall and for two hours every week in the second half of the spring semester.  The exact schedule will be set prior to the beginning of classes.  Students are graded in the seminar based on overall participation in the seminar throughout the year (1/3) and on their paper and presentation (2/3).

 

Graduate LLM Animal Law Seminar I

This seminar is a two-semester requirement for all Animal Law LL.M. students. The requirements for the course are flexible, allowing students to tailor the seminar to fit their post-LL.M. career goals. To this end, students must first propose and receive approval for an LL.M. project. For many, this project takes the shape of a formal law review paper on an animal law topic of their choice. However, other students have also chosen to create an animal nonprofit organization, author model animal law legislation for their home countries, construct animal law curricula, design a series of animal law webinars, and more.

During the fall semester, faculty and guests lead discussions on animal law topics of interest to the group, such as new case law, emerging trends, current events, and policy. During the spring semester, students prepare individual presentations to showcase their LL.M. project.

Students are graded based on overall participation in the seminar throughout, on their LL.M. project and presentation, and any additional course requirements as listed in the course syllabus.