Domestic Violence

  • 12 Common Rights for Victims

    Tens of thousands of laws afford rights to victims.  Together these rights secure for victims the “4 P’s”:  privacy, protection, participation, and property recovery.
  • 2011 Outstanding Achievement Award Recipients

    Congratulations to the recipients of NCVLI’s 2011 Outstanding Achievement Awards!  The awards were presented at the 2011 Crime Victim Law Conference in June.
  • 2012 National Day of Remembrance

    September 25 is the National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims. On the National Day of Remembrance we as a nation, state, and community recognize the devastating impact of homicide on our families, friends and nation as a whole. We also recognize and respect the rights of the loved ones of murder victims and renew our commitment to fighting for these rights.
  • 2012 Outstanding Achievement Award Winners Announced

    Congratulations to the recipients of NCVLI’s 2012 Outstanding Achievement Awards!  Each year, NCVLI accepts nominations from around the country for each of these three awards - the Legal Advocacy Award, Gail Burns-Smith Excellence in Victim Services Award, and Victims’ Rights Partnership Award.  Recipients were honored at NCVLI’s annual Crime Victim Law Conference. 
  • 2013 Legal Advocacy Award: Russell Butler

    Russell P. Butler, J.D., serves as Executive Director of the Maryland Crime Victims’ Resource Center, Inc. (MCVRC). Russell has litigated for victims in trial and appellate courts in Maryland, and beyond.  NCVLI is proud to present Russell with the 2013 Legal Advocacy Award.
  • 2013 Victims’ Rights Award Winners Announced

    NCVLI’s annual Crime Victim Law Conference provides the opportunity to pause and acknowledge the amazing work of the heroes and heroines of the victims’ rights movement.  These are the people who help victims move toward survivorship and who inspire the rest of us to continue fighting for justice each day.  Please join NCVLI as we honor these amazing people.
  • 2013 Volunteer of the Year: Caroline Park

    Caroline Park came to NCVLI in September 2012 with a background in private sector marketing as well as public and non-profit administration related to environmental issues.  Caroline volunteers at NCVLI’s offices regularly as a “Jill of all trades.”  NCVLI is honored to present Caroline with the 2013 Volunteer of the Year Award for her service to NCVLI.
  • 2014 Conference Livestreaming Now Available

    2014 Conference Livestreaming Online available at a discounted rate. Don’t miss our 2014 Conference June 20-21st.
  • 2014 Crime Victim Law Conference Photos

    2014 Crime Victim Law Conference Photos 
  • 2014 Gail-Burns Smith Excellence in Victims’ Services Award - Catherine Harper Lee

    Catherine Harper Lee, founder and executive director of The Justice League of Ohio, has spent the last 20 years pursuing her passion: restoring faith and balance in the criminal justice system. She provides free legal representation to victims of violent crime throughout Ohio to ensure their constitutional and statutory rights are enforced and protected. NCVLI is proud to present Cathy with the 2014 Gail-Burns Smith Excellence in Victim Services Award.
  • 2014 Pro Bono Attorney of the Year: Shelbi Day

    Shelbi Day has devoted her career to civil rights work and has had the privilege of working on several precedent setting cases on a diverse range of issues. This year Shelbi has assisted with legal research and helped educate NCVLI about ways to better serve the community.  NCVLI is proud to present Shelbi Day with the 2014 Pro Bono of the Year Award.
  • 2014 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award: Courthouse Dogs Foundation

    The Courthouse Dogs Foundation is a non-profit staffed by a veterinarian, a retired senior deputy prosecuting attorney, and the lovely courthouse facility dog Molly B.  Together they promote justice with compassion and provide a sense of well-being and security to vulnerable victims and witnesses during stressful legal proceedings.  NCVLI is proud to honor Courthouse Dogs Foundation with the 2014 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award.
  • 2014 Writing Contest Spotlight: Alexandra Kinsella

    Alexandra Kinsella is a writing contest winner for NCVLI’s 2014 Conference. She just completed her second year at the University of Colorado School of Law.
  • 2015 Conference Closing Plenary

    The closing plenary of the 14th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference, themed Victims. Rights. Now., features two campus sexual assault survivors turned advocates, Laura Dunn and Brenda Tracy, discussing their experiences and their advocacy to change the law. Click here to register.
  • 2015 Conference Livestreaming Now Available

    2015 Conference Livestreaming Online available at a newly discounted rate. Don’t miss our 2015 Conference May 28-29, 2015.
  • 2015 Legal Advocacy Award: Network for Victim Recovery of DC

    The Network for Victim Recovery of DC’s legal program started in 2012 with just one full time and one half time attorney and in three years has expanded to a total of seven attorneys who have served over 500 legal clients in cases ranging from identify theft and elder abuse to assault, sexual violence, and homicide.  NCVLI is proud to present NVRDC with the 2015 Legal Advocacy Award.
  • 2015 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award: Carrie Hull

    Carrie Hull, a Detective with the Ashland Police Department and Director of the You Have Options Program, has facilitated a victim-centered and offender-focused approach to sexual violence at the Department that has resulted in a significant increase in both the number of reported sexual assaults and victim satisfaction with law enforcement. NCVLI is proud to present Carrie with the 2015 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award.
  • 2016 Crime Victim Law Conference Update

    Click here to read the latest 2016 Crime Victim Law Conference updates.
  • 2016 Crime Victim Law Conference Update

    The 15th Crime Victim Law Conference is just over two months away!  We have an amazing program of experts from around the country lined up. Click here to read more.
  • 2016 Gail Burns-Smith Excellence in Victim Services Award: Valenda Applegarth

    Valenda is a Senior Staff Attorney at Greater Boston Legal Services in Boston, Massachusetts, and founder of the nation’s first Relocation Counseling Project. Ms. Applegarth has represented victims of sexual and domestic violence and stalking for more than 20 years. She has trained extensively on victim relocation, privacy, child custody jurisdiction and other related legal issues throughout the U.S. for the past 10 years. NCVLI is pleased to present Valenda with the 2016 Gail Burns-Smith Excellent in Victim Services Award.
  • 2016 Outstanding Achievement Award Nominations Due Soon

    The deadline for nominations for the 2016 Outstanding Achievement Awards has been extended to April 1, 2016. Click to submit a nomination.
  • 2016 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award - Dr. Jerry Yager

    Dr. Jerry Yager is a Clinical Psychologist, currently in private practice, with more than 30 years of experience in the assessment and treatment of traumatized children and adolescents. He specializes in working with children and adolescents who exhibit self-destructive behavior and have severe mental illness such as clinical depression, bipolar mood disorder, post-traumatic distress disorder and psychosis. NCVLI is pleased to present Dr. Yager with the 2016 Crime Victim Partnership Award.
  • 2016 Voices for Justice Reception

    Thank you to everyone who joined us last month for the Voices for Justice Reception. Click here to read more.
  • 2017 Crime Victim Law Conference Update

    Register now for early bird rates for the 2017 Crime Victim Law Conference.
  • 2017 Training Calendar

    Click here to view our training calendar.
  • 2017 Voice For Justice Honorees

    Join Us January 25, 2017 as we honor this year’s Voice For Justice Awardees. Click here to learn more.
  • 2018 Conference Update

    The 2018 Conference is SOLD OUT!
  • 2018 Conference Update

    Check out the latest Conference updates including our extended Early Bird pricing!
  • 2018 Conference Update

    Check out the latest Conference news.
  • 2019 Conference Update

  • 2019 Conference Update

  • 2019 Outstanding Achievement Award Honorees

  • 2019 Voices for Justice Reception Keynote Speaker: Carol L. Hepburn

    2019 Voices for Justice Reception Keynote Speaker: Carol L. Hepburn
  • 5th Annual Voices for Justice Reception: An Evening to Remember!

  • A Victim’s Right to Counsel During an Interview

    NCVLI releases position papers on cutting edge victims’ rights issues to help ensure vigorous assertion and enforcement of victims’ rights. We have recently released a Victim Law Position Paper detailing the right of victims to have retained counsel present during investigative interviews.  Click here to read the position paper.
  • Access In-Person & Online Trainings

    In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness month, NAVRA - NCVLI’s membership alliance - is proud to offer two trainings in October. Click here to learn more

  • Accused Rapist Cross-Examines Alleged Victim During Trial

    An accused rapist, appearing pro se, is allowed to cross-examine the rape victim for several hours in a Florida trial.
  • ACTION OHIO Coalition For Battered Women

    The Action Ohio Coalition for Battered Women is an organization of advocates for victims of domestic violence and stalking statewide.  Their website has referrals to resources and local service providers for victims, including shelter programs.
  • ADA.gov-Information and Technical Assistance on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

    USA
    The ADA Home Page provides access to ADA regulations and technical assistance materials in English and Spanish, including information about U.S. Department of Justice ADA settlement agreements and enforcement activities. ADA.gov centralizes key ADA information and links to Federal resources, including: Access to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) ADA material; ADA Standards for Accessible Design; Updates on new ADA requirements.
  • Advisory Council Profile: Jennifer Brobst

    Advisory Council Profile: Jennifer Brobst
  • Agenda for March 2, 2012 Training

    Agenda for March 2, 2012 Training
  • Air Force to assign counsel for victims of sex assault

    Air Force to assign counsel for victims of sex assault
  • Airman First Class (E-3) LRM v. Lieutenant Colonel Kastenberg, No. 2013-05, 2013 WL 1874790 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Apr. 2, 2013) (order).

    Defendant—real party in interest in the proceeding and a male Airman—was charged with raping a female Airman.  As part of a larger Air Force program to combat sexual assault, the Air Force JAG Corps had implemented a special victims’ counsel (SVC) program that requires the appointment of counsel for victims of sexual assault.  The victim was appointed SVC, who entered a formal appearance and asked the military judge to direct the parties to provide him with copies of motions filed under Military Rules of Evidence 412 (the military’s rape shield law), 513 (psychotherapist-patient privilege), and 514 (victim advocate-victim privilege).
  • Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    1-800-650-6522
    The Alabama Coalition Against Domestic Violence is an organization of advocates for victims of domestic violence statewide.  Their website has referrals to local resources and service providers for victims, such as shelter programs.





  • Alabama Crime Victims Compensation Commission

    (800) 541-9388 
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Alaska Institute for Justice

    The Alaska Institute for Justice (formerly Alaska Immigration Justice Project) is a non-profit agency that provides low-cost immigration legal assistance to immigrants and refugees in all immigration applications including citizenship, permanent resident status, work permits, asylum, family-based petitions and immigration petitions for immigrant victims of  domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. 

  • Alaska Office of Victims’ Rights

    Phone: 907-754-3460 
    Toll-free Nationwide: 844-754-3460
    The Office Of Victims’ Rights is an agency of the Alaska Legislature that provides free legal services to victims of crime to help them obtain the rights they are guaranteed under the Alaska constitution and statutes with regard to their contacts with police, prosecutors, judges, and other criminal justice agencies in this state, as well as to advance and protect those victim rights in court when necessary and authorized by law. 
  • Alaska United States Attorney’s Office

    Phone: 907-271-3041
    The role of the United States Attorney is to prosecute cases fairly and justly. If you are identified as a victim under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act, we will make our best effort to ensure you are provided the rights and services you are entitled to.
  • Alaska Victim-Witness Assistance Program

    Alaska’s Department of Law provides a Victim-Witness Assistance Program for victims whose cases are being prosecuted.  A coordinator can provide services such as help with employers and travel arrangements, advocacy and information about the criminal justice process, and work with police and other services to stop abuse and harassment.
  • Alison Wilkinson

    Violence Against Women Project Director
    Staff Attorney
  • Alleyne v. United States, 133 S. Ct. 2151 (2013).

    Defendant was convicted in federal district court of using or carrying a firearm in relation to a crime of violence, which carries a 5-year mandatory minimum sentence.  During sentencing, defendant objected to the sentencing report that recommended a 7-year sentence, incorporating the longer minimum sentence mandated if the firearm was brandished during the crime.  Defendant argued that increasing the mandatory minimum to seven years would violate his Sixth Amendment right to a jury trial because it was clear from the jury verdict that the jury did not make the finding of fact that he brandished the weapon and therefore any increase would be improperly based on the judge’s finding of fact.
  • Alumni Spotlight: Donna Maddux ‘02

    NCVLI staff recently interviewed Lewis & Clark alumna Donna Maddux ’02, Attorney in Charge of the Organized Crime Section of the Criminal Justice Division of the Oregon Department of Justice.
  • American Civil Liberties Union

    (212) 549-2500
    The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a nonpartisan non-profit organization whose stated mission is “to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.
  • Americans for Immigrant Justice: Domestic Violence & Human Trafficking Program

    305-573-1106
    AI Justice is a non-profit law firm that specializes in protecting and promoting immigrant rights in Florida and on a national level. Their Domestic Violence & Human Trafficking Program provides assistance to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, violent crime, or human trafficking.
  • Amicus Brief in Oregon Restitution Case

    NCVLI recently filed an amicus brief in the Oregon Court of Appeals in support of the victim’s right to restitution.  NCVLI urged the appellate court to hold the defendant responsible for the consequences of her criminal activity and affirm the restitution order.  As NCVLI argued, to do otherwise would improperly and unfairly place the financial burden on the victim to pay for the harm caused by defendant’s conduct.
  • Amicus Filed in Hope Solo Domestic Violence Case to Protect Victim Privacy

    The National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) filed a brief urging that domestic violence charges against U.S. Women’s National Team goalkeeper Hope Solo be reinstated. Click here to read more.
  • Amy Liu

    Pro Bono Attorney Spotlight: Amy Liu
  • An Inspiring Voices for Justice Reception

    Thanks to our generous sponsors and community for supporting the event.
  • Announcing New NAVRA Website

    The National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys & Advocates (NAVRA) has a new website. Click here to learn more.
  • Annulli v. Warden, No. TSR-CV14-4005806-S (Conn. Super. Ct. Jan. 23, 2015).

    mes Clark and the Victim Rights Center of Connecticut, Inc., represented the victim in this case, arguing to protect the victim’s rights to protection and privacy during the habeas proceedings.

    Mot. For Protective Orders for the Victim & Mem. of Decision, Annulli v. Warden, No. TSR-CV14-4005806-S (Conn. Super. Ct. Jan. 23, 2015).  Petitioner was convicted of sexual assault and subsequently petitioned for writ of habeas corpus.  During the habeas proceedings, the victim filed a motion for protective order asking the superior court to issue an order precluding petitioner and his agents from approaching the victim or her family and issuing any subpoenas on the victim and her family without prior judicial approval and only after a hearing in which petitioner demonstrated that the information sought was relevant to the claims in his petition.  

  • April 18-24 is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week

    Over the last 30 years tens of thousands of laws have been passed affording rights to victims in the criminal justice system.  Sadly, these laws are not always fully respected.  This year’s CVRW theme - Crime Victims’ Rights:  Fairness, Dignity, Respect - reminds us to be vigilant and to protect all victims’ rights.
  • April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) aims to raise public awareness about sexual violence and to educate communities and individuals on how to prevent sexual violence. For more information on SAAM, please click here.

  • April Volunteer Day

    Our First Friday Volunteer Day is next Friday, April 4th, and we hope that you will join us! There are many projects to get involved in, including our Annual Crime Victim Law Conference. Come from 12-2PM or 2-4PM or both! Lunch will be provided. RSVP at ncvli@lclark.edu. We look forward to seeing you!
  • Arizona Attorney General Victim Services

    The Arizona Attorney General’s Victims’ Rights Program has information about the rights of crime victims in Arizona.  The office can also refer victims to various services and operates a victim compensation program.
  • Arizona Clinic and NCVLI Secure Legal Victory for Victims of Hit-and-Run Offense

    NCVLI and its partner clinic, Arizona Voice for Crime Victims, helped  the state of Arizona secure a victory for victims’ rights in the Arizona Court of Appeals.
  • Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence

    The Arizona Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence is an organization of advocates for victims of domestic violence statewide.  Their website has referrals to local resources and service providers for victims, such as shelter programs.
  • Arizona Crime Victim Rights Law Group (AZCVRLG)

    Phone: 480-946-0832
    Arizona Crime Victim Rights Law Group (AZCVRLG) is an Arizona non-profit corporation that provides legal services as counsel of record and access to social support services to victims of crime, including but not limited to domestic violence crime victims, white collar crime victims, victims of violent crimes, vehicular crimes, and property crimes at no cost to them. AZCVRLG believes crime victims deserve transparent and respectful communication as we balance a close working relationship with careful attention to victim service needs. Our holistic, client-centered philosophy includes always interacting with crime victims in a dignified and respectful way. 
  • Arizona Homicide Survivors

    Arizona’s Homicide Survivors Inc provides support groups, counseling, funding for funeral expenses, and other resources for survivors of homicide.
  • Arizona Voice for Crime Victims

    (480) 600-2661

    The mission of Arizona Voice for Crime Victims is to ensure that crime victims receive their rights to justice, due process and dignified treatment throughout the criminal justice process. The website has links to resources, forms and statutes.

  • Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    (800) 269-4668
    The Arkansas Coalition Against Domestic Violence is a member program of advocates for victims of domestic violence and stalking statewide.  Their website has referrals to local services and resources for victims such as shelter programs.
  • Arkansas Crime Victims Reparations Program

    501-682-1020
    800-448-3014
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, crime scene cleanup, and funeral costs.
  • ASISTA

    (515) 244-2469
    ASISTA provides centralized assistance for advocates and attorneys facing complex legal problems in advocating for immigrant survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.
  • Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD)-Resources Focusing on Persons with Disabilities Who Are Victims of Crime

    The AUCD is a nonprofit network of interdisciplinary centers advancing policy and practice for and with individuals with developmental and other disabilities, their families, and communities. Together with The Wyoming Institute for Disabilities (WIND) and the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), AUCD has developed a Victims of Crime with Disabilities Resource Guide: an online searchable database of print and multimedia products and training programs for service providers in the disability and victim advocacy fields. Tools include discussion boards, funding news, and a calendar and newsletter to help share information and bridge the gap between victim assistance and disability professionals.
  • Attorney Grievance Comm’n v. Smith, — A.3d —, 2015 WL 737412 (Md. Feb. 23, 2015).

    Attorney Grievance Comm’n v. Smith, — A.3d —, 2015 WL 737412 (Md. Feb. 23, 2015).  The Attorney Grievance Commission (“Commission”), filed a Petition for Disciplinary or Remedial Action against a former assistant state’s attorney (ASA) alleging that he violated Maryland Lawyers’ Rules of Professional Conduct (MLRPC) 1.3 (diligence), 3.3 (candor toward a tribunal), and 8.4(a), (c), and (d) (misconduct) when he failed to communicate at all with the victim or victim’s representative in a child sexual abuse case he prosecuted, which was an evasion of the former ASA’s constitutional and statutory obligations under the state’s victims’ rights laws.  A disciplinary hearing was held and the hearing judge concluded that the former ASA had violated MLRPC 1.3, but had not violated MLRPC 3.3 or 8.4.  The Commission took exception to the hearing judge’s conclusion and appealed.  The Court of Appeals concluded that although the former ASA did not purposefully deprive the child-victim of notice and information, the consistent failure to ensure that the appropriate information and notices were provided to the victim and her foster mother, among other things, was prejudicial to the administration of justice.
  • Attorneys, Coalition To Be Honored at Conference After N.H. Rape Shield Case

    Attorneys, Coalition To Be Honored at Conference After N.H. Rape Shield Case
  • Background

    Over recent years Romania has experienced a rise in large scale organized crimes.  Common among these crimes are wide-scale internet frauds that often target victims living within the United States.
  • Barrett v. State, CC D110426M, SC S059423 (Or. May 27, 2011).

    Defendant was charged with stalking the victim, his estranged wife.  Soon thereafter, the victim informed the prosecutor’s office that she was invoking her state constitutional rights to be notified in advance of sentencing and other critical stage hearings, and she timely completed and returned a form memorializing these requests.  The victim was told by the victim advocate that she did not need to be present for an upcoming pretrial appearance by defendant.  During this time, the prosecutor and defendant were engaging in plea negotiations, and at the scheduled pretrial hearing, defendant pleaded guilty to stalking the victim and was immediately sentenced to two years’ probation.  When the victim learned that defendant had pleaded guilty and been sentenced in her absence, she filed a claim asserting the violation of her state constitutional and statutory rights to be present and informed in advance of any critical stage proceedings, and to be heard at sentencing.
  • Be the Change

    Be the Change
  • Biden to Discuss New Guidelines About Campus Sex Crimes

    Vice President Biden urges schools and colleges to do more after the Education Department issued new instructions about schools’ responsibilities to prevent sexual violence. 
  • Board Member Spotlight: Janis Puracal

  • Board Spotlight: Lisa Zauner

    Board Spotlight: Lisa Zauner is an Audit Senior Manager at Perkins & Company.
  • Breaking Down Language Barriers in Victim Access to Justice

    NCVLI recently provided assistance to an Oregon attorney to ensure that the court appointed an interpreter to her non-English speaking client’s case to ensure that the victim could access justice and participate in a meaningful way.
  • Calendar of Summer Trainings

    Click here to learn more about our upcoming trainings.
  • California - Victims’ Advocates Protest as Prosecutors Detain 17-Year-Old Rape Victim

    California - Victims’ Advocates Protest as Prosecutors Detain 17-Year-Old Rape Victim
  • California Attorney General Victims’ Services Unit (VSU)

    The California Attorney General’s VSU provides information about the rights of crime victims in California. 
  • California Crime Survivors

    (949) 872-7895
    Toll free: (844) 853-HOPE (4673)

    California Crime Survivors Inc’s mission is to ensure the public knows victims’ rights and needs and to provide resources, support, and information to empower crime victims to survive and thrive.  Victim services include legal information, support groups, and safety trainings.
  • California Justice for Homicide Victims

    Crisis & Emotional Support Hotline - 310-457-0030
    California Justice for Homicide Victims advocates for the legal rights of survivors of homicide by providing them information about victims’ rights in all aspects of the criminal justice system.
  • California Victim Compensation Program

    800-777-9229
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, child care, relocation costs, job retraining, crime scene cleanup, and funeral costs.
  • Captive Test Page

    Test page. See video below.
  • Case Update!

    Case Update: A victory in Arizona that will allow a victim to be heard on restitution!  Read the full decision here.
  • Celebrating the 2018 Crime Victim Law Conference

    More than 400 victim attorneys, advocates, survivors, law enforcement and other allied professionals attended the 2018 Crime Victim Law Conference!
  • Center for Victim and Human Rights

    Telephone (317) 610-3427
    The Center for Victim and Human Rights (CVHR) is a 501(c)(3) organization that was established in 2008 with the specific purpose of providing comprehensive legal representation to victims of crime and human rights abuses, who often lack the safety and resources necessary to access available legal remedies.
  • Civil Practice Tips

    Federal Victims’ Rights Do Not Apply in Civil Proceedings and Discretion in Deciding Whom to Arrest Cannot be Exercised in a Discriminatory Fashion
  • Clarifying the Purpose of Restitution

    Contemporary criminal restitution is what is known as sui generis (i.e., legally unique), serving both civil and criminal law goals. Despite its unique nature and historical roots, defendants are beginning to argue that restitution requires a jury determination. Read more to find out how NCVLI is fighting to protect restitution for victims.
  • CLEs in Honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month

    NCVLI is excited to offer two victim law online CLE trainings this April in honor of Sexual Assault Awareness month through NAVRA, our membership alliance.
  • Collaboration in Arizona to Enhance Rights Enforcement

    September marks one year of operation for an amazing collaborative effort in Arizona.  The Victims’ Rights Enforcement Project is an innovative partnership of six organizations working to secure enforcement of victims’ legal rights through pro bono legal and social services to crime victims.  Click here to read more about the project and its impact.

  • Colorado Attorney General Victim Assistance Program

    The Victim Assistance Program provides information and support for victims of violent crimes in all cases handled by the several units within the criminal justice section. Among other duties, the advocate in this unit provides referral to post-trauma counseling and referral to victim compensation.
  • Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (303) 839-9999
    The Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault is a membership organization promoting safety, justice, and healing for survivors while working toward the elimination of sexual violence.  Their website has referrals to local crisis centers statewide that provide support to victims.
  • Colorado Network to End Human Trafficking (CoNEHT)

    Hotline:  1-866-455-5075

    The CoNEHT Hotline is Colorado’s only 24-hour crisis, resource and tip line dedicated to addressing instances of human trafficking. It is staffed by volunteer advocates who complete a 40-hour hotline advocate training. If you need to speak with someone to report suspected human trafficking, please contact the Colorado Network to End Human Trafficking (CoNEHT) Hotline. 

  • Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance

    Colorado
    It is committed to fairness and healing for crime victims, their families and communities through leadership, education, and advocacy. COVA’s vision is to be recognized as a national leader in building a collaborative environment where crime victims are given the opportunity to heal and restore balance to their lives.
  • Colorado Organization for Victim Assistance (COVA)

    The COVA Human Trafficking program provides case management services for victims of trafficking - domestic and international victims; adults and minors; sex and labor trafficking.  Their website provides contact information for assistance.

  • Community United Against Violence

    (415) 777-5500
    CUAV works to build the power of LGBTQQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning) communities to transform violence and oppression.
  • Conference Spotlight: Program Highlights

    The 13th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference is fast approaching!  Join us June 20-21st in Portland, OR. The program is packed with amazing speakers presenting on cutting edge topics!  Read these highlights and register today!
  • Conference Spotlight: Responding to Violence Against Women

    In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness month, we spotlight upcoming training opportunities to increase the field’s capacity to advance rights. This year’s Crime Victim Law Conference on June 20-21, 2014 in Portland, OR is packed with sessions on protecting the rights of survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and dating violence.
  • Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    (888) 774-2900
    (844) 831-9200 (Spanish)
    The Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence is a membership program of advocates for victims of domestic violence and stalking statewide.  Their website has referrals to local resources and service providers for victims, such as shelter programs.
  • Connecticut Judicial Branch’s Office of Victim Services

    (860) 263-2760
    (800) 822-8428

    The Office of Victim Services (OVS), Connecticut Judicial Branch, is the state’s lead agency established to provide services to victims of violent crime.

  • Connecticut: Office of the Victim Advocate

    The Office of the Victim Advocate (OVA) is an independent state “watchdog” agency charged with protecting and promoting the rights of crime victims in Connecticut’s criminal justice system and with monitoring and evaluating the provision of services by Connecticut’s victim services delivery system.
  • Cook County Victim Legal Assistance Network

    Cook County Victim Legal Assistance Network
  • Court Appointed Special Advocate Program (CASA)

    CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for abused and neglected children, and to make sure they don’t get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home.
  • Courthouse

    Courthouse Test
  • Crime Victim Law Conference & Reception: Daring to Imagine

    On June 10-11 we hosted our annual Crime Victim Law Conference & Rights Reception. Click here to see details and pictures.
  • Crime Victim Law Conference: Time To Get Loud

    On May 11-12, 2017 we hosted our annual Crime Victim Law Conference & Rights Reception. Click here to read more about it.
  • Crime Victim Litigation Clinic Working to Advance Victims’ Rights

    Each term NCVLI teaches the Crime Victim Litigation Clinic at Lewis & Clark Law School. This spring four second year law students are working to advance victims’ rights.  Click here to learn more about their work.
  • Crime Victims First

    (512) 763-7674
    Crime Victims First’s mission is to promote and protect crime victims’ rights, prevent rights violations, and improve the treatment of victims/survivors through education, advocacy, and enforcement using technology. Their website has educational material about victims’ rights and an online rights violation reporting system, as well as the means to contact an advocate with questions about victims’ rights.
  • Crime victims seek more say in judicial process

    Crime victims seek more say in judicial process
  • Crime Victims’ Rights Ombudsman

    (877) 574-9302
    (202) 252-1010
    A crime victim may file a complaint against any employee of the Department of Justice who violated or failed to provide the rights established under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act of 2004.
  • Crime Victims’ Rights Week Event

    Join NCVLI for a Community Awareness Event at 12:15PM on April 3, 2017 in McCarty Classroom 1
  • Criminal Practice Tips

    Criminal: Broad Restitution
    State v. Wood, No. 081903155 (Utah Dist. Ct. Aug. 3, 2009)(order).
  • Cristina Ursan

    Volunteer spotlight: Cristina Ursan
  • D.C. Rape Crisis Center (DCRCC)

    (202) 333-7273
    The D.C. Rape Crisis Center provides counseling and other support services to survivors of sexual assault and their families.
  • DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence (DCCADV)

    (202) 299-1181

    DCCADV is the District’s leading voice on domestic violence public policy, systems coordination and reform. Partnering with and on behalf of our member programs, we: track and analyze legislative and systemic activity impacting victims and survivors of domestic violence; educate policy makers; conduct outreach and facilitate collaboration with community based organizations and stakeholders; lead advocacy efforts for funding for domestic violence programs and services; develop briefing papers, reports and other public materials, and; provide technical assistance and training on issues including confidentiality, domestic violence laws, barriers facing underserved populations including victims who are LGBT and victims with disabilities, and workplace policies and procedures.
  • Deaf Vermonters Advocacy Services (DVAS)

    The mission of DVAS is to enrich the lives of people with hearing loss by providing access to services, education and advocacy.  Their website offers links to resources and services for deaf victims in Vermont.
  • Dear Victims’ Rights Community

    Dear Victims’ Rights Community,
    This summer, we were honored to work with incredibly talented and passionate members of our community.  In this issue you will learn about some of these people: the law student interns who spent their summers working on behalf of victims and the many local community members who came to our Community Open House to show support for and get further involved with NCVLI and our partner clinic, the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center.    We were also fortunate to work with some of the premier victims’ rights attorneys in the country, who served as pro bono local counsel this summer in groundbreaking victims’ rights cases reaching all levels of the court system - trial courts, state supreme courts, and the United States Supreme Court.  Practitioners on the ground around the country ensure that victim voices are heard, moving the courts toward recognizing these rights as fundamental human rights.  In this issue’s segment on rights we discuss the importance of viewing crime victims’ rights through a human rights lens.  Watch our next issue for spotlights of pro bono attorneys who brought these fundamental rights to the attention of the courts in critical victims’ rights cases this summer!
  • Dear Victims’ Rights Community

    Dear Victims’ Rights Community,
    June was a truly inspiring month in the victims’ rights community.  At NCVLI’s 10th Annual Crime Victims’ Rights Conference, members of the victims’ rights community congregated from across the country, representing every corner of the field.  The Conference was not only a time for victims’ rights practitioners to learn from each other, but also to network, build community, and have fun!

    Below you will see a few examples of the victims’ rights community members who brought their passion to the Conference and helped make the event such a success.  You will also read about our 3rd Annual Crime Victims’ Rights Reception - an event that allowed conference attendees to relax and catch up after a long day of learning at the Conference.  The energy at this event was palpable and the photos are great!  Read on to get inspired!

    Sincerely,
    The NCVLI Team  
  • Dear Victims’ Rights Community,

    Happy New Year!  We ended 2010 with amazing community involvement, and we are looking forward to another year of engaging with our community to advance victims’ rights.
  • Defending & Strengthening Protective Orders

    NCVLI partnered with the Rocky Mountain Victim Law Center (RMVLC) on a critical issue moving through Colorado courts. Click here to read more.
  • Defending Victim Privacy & the Right to Refuse Discovery

  • Delaware Attorney General Victim/Witness Assistance

    Delaware’s Victim/Witness Assistance Program can provide crime victims with information about the criminal justice process.  Services include notification of the proceedings, assistance with restitution, and information about crime victim’s rights.
  • Delaware Victims’ Compensation Assistance Program

    Delaware Helpline: 800-464-HELP
    302-255-1770
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Department of Justice awards $9.4m to identify and prevent gender bias in policing

    Department of Justice awards $9.4m to identify and prevent gender bias in policing

  • Dianne Barker Harrold

    Member
  • Digest 101 - December 2017

    The latest in global news & media affecting crime victims.
  • Digest 101 - May 2017

    Click here to read the latest global news & media affecting crime victims.
  • Digest 101 - October 101

    Click here to read the latest global news & media affecting crime victims.
  • Disability Rights Oregon

    503-243-2081 or Toll Free 800-452-1694
    TTY users: dial 711
    Disability Rights Oregon (DRO) is a non-profit law office that provides advocacy and legal services to people with disabilities who have an issue related to their disability.  The organization provides free information and referral services.  
  • Disability Services ASAP

    USA
    Disability Services ASAP (A Safety Awareness Program) provides training and education to help increase awareness about and prevent sexual and domestic violence and abuse. Through custom designed presentations and trainings for disability service providers, domestic and sexual violence staff and criminal justice personnel, the program offers technical assistance and consultation to individuals and organizations seeking guidance to reduce the risks of abuse against individuals with disabilities or to enhance accessibility to persons with disabilities.
  • DOJ Honors the National Crime Victim Law Institute

    Article in Lewis & Clark Law School Advocate Magazine about the award NCVLI received in the spring of 2013 from the United States Department of Justice.
  • Domestic Abuse Helpline for Men and Women (DAHMW)

    (888)743-5754
    The DAHMW works to provide crisis intervention and support services to victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and their families in order to help survivors recover from the trauma of IPV.  Contact the crisis hotline at 1-888-743-5754 for referrals to services such as emergency shelters, counseling, and support groups.  DAHMW also has resources specifically for male and LGTBQ victims of domestic violence.
  • Domestic Violence Counts 2010: A 24-hour census of domestic violence shelters and services

    91% of identified domestic violence programs in the United States participated in the 2010 National Census of Domestic Violence Services. The results are available here.
  • Don’t Miss NAVRA’s Online CLE Sale

    Save up to 50%.
  • Double Your Impact!

    Jennifer Storm, NCVLI Board Director is matching gifts this week through 11/11
  • Doug Beloof

    Secretary; Member of Executive Committee and Nominating Committee
  • Douglas G. Houser

    Ex Oficio
  • DrugRehab.com

    855-408-6156
    DrugRehab.com is a web resource provided and funded by Advanced Recovery Systems (ARS). ARS is an integrated behavioral health care management organization dedicated to the treatment of addiction, substance abuse, eating disorders and mental health issues. 
  • East Coast: Safe Horizon Anti-Trafficking Program

    The Safe Horizon Anti-Trafficking Program provides intensive case management to women, men, and children who have been victims of labor and sex trafficking on the East Coast. Case managers provide social and legal services, as well as referrals for other support.
  • Empowered Victims & Enhanced Justice: NCVLI’s 2011-2012 Annual Report

    NCVLI’s Annual Report, published each fall, is an opportunity to reflect on the successes and challenges of the prior year, and to recognize and thank all of those who helped us achieve so much.  We thank our amazing community of survivors, attorneys, advocates, volunteers, and donors who stand behind our vision of a balanced and fair justice system.
  • Ensuring Timely Restitution

    When a child has been abused, restitution is necessary to pay for much needed counseling on the long road toward recovery.  NCVLI is working on a case where the abuser is trying to dodge paying.
  • Ensuring Victims’ Voices Are Heard

    Victim’s voices are critical to justice and we work day in and day out to ensure victims’ voices are head. Click here to learn more.
  • Ex-Minuteman likely to question girls in sex-abuse trial

    Ex-Minuteman likely to question girls in sex-abuse trial
  • Fall 2009 Crime Victim Litigation Clinic Students Help Advance Victims’ Rights

    NCVLI’s Crime Victim Litigation Clinic had another successful semester this past fall, expanding to include 7 students because of high demand. Students had lots of opportunity for legal research and writing as they learned about victims’ rights law.

  • Family Equality Council

    (617) 502-8700
    Family Equality Council connects, supports, and represents the three million parents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender in this country and their six million children.
  • Featured Right: Notice

    Our featured right this issue is the right to notice - “the gateway right.”
  • Featured Right: Restitution

    Restitution is money paid from the offender to the victim for losses that the victim suffered as a result of the offender’s crime.  The right to restitution is a vital component of ensuring that victims of crime are treated fairly and with dignity; it plays a pivotal role in making sure that victims receive the financial assistance they need to begin to address the impact that the defendant’s crime has had on their lives and helps them in moving toward survivorship.
  • Federal Trade Commission

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is a governmental agency whose mission is to protect consumers. The FTC homepage provides links to a number of fraud-related information pages including privacy & security, internet fraud & safety, spam emails, and web scams. These pages provide educational materials to raise awareness about different types of fraud and practical tips to prevent fraud. The FTC is also the central reporting mechanism for fraud and ID theft. They do not resolve individual complaints but reporting is used to detect patterns that help lead to investigations and prosecutions. The website walks consumers through the complaint process with an online form.
  • Federal Trade Commission ID Theft Program

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) I.D. Theft Website is a resource to learn about the crime of identity theft. The website provides detailed information to help protect against identity theft, and the steps to take if it occurs. The FTC’s website contains a comprehensive reference center with links to specific laws, contact information, and resources from state and federal government agencies.
  • Fighting for a Child-Victim’s Rights to Fairness, Privacy, and Protection

    NCVLI recently provided legal technical assistance to protect the rights of a child-victim of sexual abuse whose abuse was captured in images and distributed.  The defendant, the victim’s mother, pled guilty to possession and distribution of the images and is awaiting sentencing.  At the same time, however, defendant moved the state custody court in a related proceeding to order a psychiatric evaluation of the child.  NCVLI fought to protect the child by opposing this invasive order.
  • Fighting for a Victim’s Dignity and Privacy

    NCVLI and its Oregon clinic are fighting for a victim’s right to privacy and dignity.
  • Fighting for a Victim’s Right to Restitution

    NCVLI is happy to report a positive outcome in an Arizona case where we joined a gunshot victim’s attorney to ensure that future lost wages and probable future medical care costs were included in the restitution award. 
  • Fighting for Fairness, Dignity and Respect

    Click to read about NCVLI’s most recent advocacy work in Arizona.
  • Fighting for immigrant crime victims’ rights to privacy & protection!

    An immigration attorney representing a child-victim of sexual assault sought assistance from NCVLI to protect the victim’s rights to privacy and protection.
  • Fighting for Positive Case Law

    As part of NCVLI’s legal advocacy work, we participate in cases around the country as amicus curiae, which is Latin for “friend of the court.” Our role as amicus is to explain to the courts how their decision in any single case will impact future victims. Click here to read about our latest amicus work.
  • Fighting for Restitution for Assault Victim

    An attorney with a Washington, D.C. area victim services organization contacted NCVLI for assistance with securing restitution for an assault victim. We crafted an argument that criminal contempt is not a victimless crime and that restitution to the victim was proper.
  • Fighting for Victim Privacy

    Most jurisdictions have passed laws that limit or prohibit the use of evidence of a victim’s past sexual history to undermine that victim’s credibility- commonly referred to as rape shield laws. These laws are meant to protect victims from disclosure of private information. Click here to read about one case in which we are fighting to protect a victims’ privacy in the aftermath of her rape and murder.
  • Fighting for Victims’ Access to Justice

    An Oregon attorney representing a minor victim pro bono after the victim was badly beaten in his high school parking lot contacted NCVLI seeking assistance after his request to access the police report in the case was denied.  

  • Fighting for Victims’ Rights When a Defendant’s Death Vacates Conviction

    NCVLI is filing an amicus curiae brief in support of the Arizona Voice for Crime Victims’ Petition for Special Action to do away with the doctrine of abatement ab initio, a practice that vacates an offender’s conviction when they die.  The case involves the surviving family of a murder victim whose rights to fairness and justice have been violated by the application of abatement ab initio in the death of the defendant who murdered their loved one.
  • Fighting to Protect a Child-Victim of Trafficking

    NCVLI, with the help of pro bono attorney Alix Wicks, recently provided legal technical assistance in a case involving a child-victim of sex trafficking to ensure that she receives the advocacy she needs.
  • Fighting Victim Blaming!

    Read about the most recent joint advocacy effort by NCVLI and OCVLI in Oregon!
  • Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force

    National
    The Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force was created in November 2009 in response to the economic crisis and increases in financial fraud. The Task Force is made up of law enforcement, investigatory and regulatory agencies at all levels of government. The Task Force aims to improve the investigation and prosecution of financial crimes, improve efforts to help victims remedy losses, and address financial discrimination in the lending and financial markets. The Task Force’s website, stopfraud.gov, has information on the varied types of fraud, reporting agencies, and prevention techniques.
  • Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force Announces Results of Broadest Mortgage Fraud Sweep in History

    Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force Announces Results of Broadest Mortgage Fraud Sweep in History
  • FindLegalHelp.org

    The American Bar Association’s Findlegalhelp.org website will guide you to a list of resources in your state, including pro bono legal representation for victims in civil cases.
  • Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    (800) 500-1119
    TDD: (800) 621-4202
    The Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence is an organization of advocates for victims of domestic violence and stalking statewide.  Their website has referrals to local resources and service providers for victims, such as shelter programs.
  • Florida Crime Victim Compensation

    Toll Free: (800) 226-6667
    Tallahassee Area Residents: (800) 414-300
    Division of Victim Services: (850) 414-3300
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Florida Network of Victim Witness Services

    Florida
    For 29 years the Network has been providing support and technical assistance for advocates in the emerging field of Victim Assistance and Witness Management. The rights of crime victims have evolved and the field of advocacy is a firmly established profession within the fields of criminal justice and social services. The Network has been an important entity in promoting these rights and establishing standards for professional training and services since 1979.
  • FORGE

    FORGE was founded in 1994 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to provide peer support primarily to those on the female-to-male (FTM) gender spectrum and local Significant Others, Friends, Family, and Allies (SOFFAs).
  • From Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Crime Victims’ Rights Week: A Busy Time at NCVLI

    From Sexual Assault Awareness Month and Crime Victims’ Rights Week: A Busy Time at NCVLI.  From trainings to community events to advocating for strong public policy, April is a full month. Click here to see everything we are doing to protect, enforce, and advance victims’ rights.
  • FTC supports legislation to fortify data breach reporting requirements

    FTC supports legislation to fortify data breach reporting requirements
  • Full Restitution for Victims – A Chance to Finally Get it Right

    Senate Bill 2301 – the Amy and Vicky Child Pornography Victim Restitution Act of 2014 – provides clear guidance to victims and district federal courts on the issue of restitution.

  • Gain Knowledge & Get Involved

    NCVLI is committed to increasing awareness of and about victims’ rights. To achieve this, we have created a number of ways for our community to gain knowledge and get involved to make an impact for victims. Click here to read more.
  • Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders (GLAD)

    Through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education, Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders works in New England and nationally to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation. 
  • Georgia Attorney General Victim Assistance

    (404) 656-3300
    Toll free: (800) 436-7442
    Georgia’s Office of the Attorney General provides information about the rights of and services for crime victims in Georgia.
  • Georgia Crime Victims Compensation Program

    (404) 657-2222
    Toll free: (800) 547-0060
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Georgia Victim Legal Assistance Network

    Georgia Victim Legal Assistance Network
  • Get Involved & Make A Difference for Victims

    There are so many ways to get involved and make an difference for victims. Click here to find out how.
  • Give A Victim Service Provider the Recognition They Deserve

    Nominations for the Voice for Justice Award are due by December 1st. Click here to submit a nomination.
  • GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project

    Domestic Violence Hotline: (800) 832-1901
    Sexual Assault Hotline: (617) 779-2127
    GLBTQ Domestic Violence Project works to assist and support victims and survivors of domestic violence, focusing on GLBTQ communities, to bring about responsive public policy, and to increase access to culturally competent services. 
  • Greater Boston Legal Services: Relocation Counseling Project

    Main Office: (617) 371-1234; Cambridge/Somerville: (617) 603-2700
    Main Office Toll free: (800) 323-3205
    TDD: Main Office: (617) 371-1228; Cambridge/Somerville: (617) 494-1757
    The RCP offers counseling to individuals and service providers in Massachusetts for victims/survivors who are seeking to relocate from or to Massachusetts for purposes of escaping an abuser.
  • Gun Violence Prosecution

    USA
    The Mission of NDAA’s Gun Violence Prosecution Program is to support Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a landmark initiative to dramatically reduce gun-related violence in America, through professional training, technical assistance and publications.
  • Hawaii Sex Abuse Treatment Center

    (808) 524-7273
    The Hawaii Sex Abuse Treatment Center’s mission is to support the emotional healing process of those sexually assaulted in Hawaii, to increase community awareness about their needs and to reduce the incidence of all forms of sexual assault.  The center provides crisis and medical services to survivors of sexual assault and abuse.
  • Heidi Nestel, NCVLI Legal Advocacy Award recipient

    Heidi Nestel, Executive Director for the Utah Crime Victims Legal Clinic, dedicates herself to helping victims have a voice.
  • Helene R. Davis

    President of the Board, Member of Executive Committee and Education Committee
  • Help Us Answer the Call In 2017

    We accomplished a lot in the past year.  Click here to learn from our Executive Director how your support ensures we can do even more in 2017.
  • Her Justice

    InMotion provides free legal services to low-income women in New York City. Their services are designed to address the unique needs of women who suffer from abuse—most of their clients are survivors of domestic violence. They focus on reaching women living in immigrant communities who are isolated by language and cultural barriers.
  • Historic Day for Victims’ Rights

    On January 22, 2014, the United States Supreme Court will - for the first time in history - hear from a victim’s attorney about her rights in the criminal case Paroline v. United States.  Click here to follow the progress of the case.
  • Holistic Legal Services for Victims

    The federal Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) listened to the field during the Vision 21 project and funded 10 legal networks across the country and selected NCVLI to be the training and technical assistance provider.  Follow the progress of this effort on our Click here.
  • HopeLine

    (847) 706-1733
    Hopeline connects survivors of domestic violence to vital resources, funds organizations nationwide and protects the environment.
  • Hot Off The Presses

    The latest release of our Violence Against Women Bulletin is available: Future Expenses: A Necessary Component of Restitution.
  • Hot Off The Presses: Three Special Editions of our Crime Victim Law Update

    The most recent edition of the Crime Victim Law Update  - the 2014 Year in Review - is a series of three Updates. Click here to learn more.
  • Hot Off the Presses: Violence Against Women Bulletin

    We are excited to announce the release of our latest Violence Against Women BulletinThe Intersection of Title IX and Victims’ Rights: Protecting Victims from Subpoenas for School Disciplinary Records. Click here to read the Bulletin.
  • How can I find out the custody status of an offender and receive updates on a criminal case?

    VINE offers crime victims and other concerned citizens the ability to receive updates on criminal cases, offender custody status, and the option to register to be notified in the event of an offender’s release, transfer or escape.  The website provides information on the availability of VINE by state, how to register, and links to training opportunities for using the VINE systems.  VINE notifications are available online, by phone, email, text messaging, or TTY device.
  • How can I learn about some common victims’ rights?

    Victims’ rights in the criminal justice system vary from state to state and between the states and the federal criminal justice systems. To know what your rights are:
  • How common is online fraud in the United States?

    Unfortunately, online fraud is an extremely common crime with ever-increasing rates.
  • How do I find an attorney?

    Victims often need attorneys to protect their rights during the civil cases.  Anytime a victim is seeking an attorney (s)he will want to interview that attorney to ensure it is a good fit.  Some questions to ask as you consider retaining an attorney can be found here.
  • How do I know what rights exist for crime victims in my state?

    Please click here to go to our library and download the document which provides the key victims’ rights laws in your state (or the state where the crime occurred).
  • How You Can Help a Crime Victim

    There are many ways your donations can help a crime victim and many creative ways you can donate!  From participating in our holiday giving campaign, to donating an item to our annual Crime Victims’ Rights Reception auction, to throwing a fundraising party with NCVLI as the designated charity, to signing onto our website any day of the year to make a donation - every penny and every effort counts and makes a huge difference for victims!  Recently one the members of our Board of Directors, Lisa Zauner, got creative and raised almost $300 for NCVLI just by wearing jeans!  Click hereto read more.
  • I Have The Right To

  • Idaho Attorney General Crime Victim Assistance

    (208) 334-2400
    Toll free: (888) 334-4547
    The Idaho Attorney General’s Office provides assistance to victims while their cases are being prosecuted, general victim assistance information, and referrals to services for all crime victims in Idaho.
  • Idaho Council on Domestic Violence and Victim Assistance

    (800) 291-0463

    (800) 669-3176 (Helpline)

    The Council’s mission is to fund state-wide programs that serve victims of crime, and to help victims through legislation, advocacy, training, and public awareness.  Their website has referrals to local shelter services.
  • Identity Theft Resource Center

    Founded in 1999, the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC) is national nonprofit organization that focuses exclusively on identity theft. ITRC’s mission is to research, analyze and distribute information about the growing crime of identity theft. The ITRC serves as a resource and advisory center on identity theft, and its website contains information for consumers, victims, law enforcement, the business and financial sectors, legislators, media and governmental agencies.
  • Identity theft: Texas border, Brooklyn among nation’s ID theft hot spots

    Identity theft: Texas border, Brooklyn among nation’s ID theft hot spots
  • If a crime is committed against me on Indian lands in which court (state, federal or tribal) will the case proceed?

    If a crime is committed against me on Indian lands in which court (state, federal or tribal) will the case proceed?
  • Illinois - Victims’ rights legislation gets nod from committee

    One Bartlett woman says she feels vindicated by an Illinois House committee’s recent approval of victims’ rights legislation.
  • Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    (877) 863-6338
    The Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence (ILCADV) is a non-profit membership organization of advocates for victims of domestic violence throughout Illinois.  Their website has referrals to local shelter services.
  • Illinois Crime Victim Compensation Program

    (800) 228-3368
    (877) 398-1130 TTY
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, relocation, crime scene cleanup, limited replacement of property, and funeral costs.
  • IllinoisVictims.org

    Call: 312-882-4584
    Email: IllinoisVictims@gmail.com
    Illinois’ grassroots victims rights organization, sharing information and resources for victims of violent crime, advocating for the enforcement of our Constitutionally guaranteed victims rights, and for public safety.
  • Improving NCVLI’s Resources

    Thank you to everyone who participated in our resource survey!  Click here to learn more about the survey results.
  • In re Allen, No. 12-40954 (5th Cir. Sept. 6, 2012) (per curiam order).

    A jury convicted corporate defendants CITGO Petroleum Corporation and CITGO Refining and Chemicals Company, L.P., of illegally operating two large tanks in a Texas refinery without first installing emission control devices as required by the Clean Air Act.  The tanks contained chemicals including benzene and other hazardous compounds.  As a result of this crime, members of a residential community adjacent to the refinery were exposed to noxious chemical air emissions for nine years.
  • In re G.R., --- A.3d ---, No. 32, Sept. Term, 2018, 2019 WL 1434571 (Md. Apr. 1, 2019)

  • In re The Morning Star Packing Co., — F.3d —, No. 13-71048, 2013 WL 1278086 (9th Cir. Mar. 29, 2013).

    Corporate victims of defendant’s offense filed a petition for mandamus in response to the district court’s decision to deny restitution.  On review, the Ninth Circuit held that the district court erred in relying, in part, on a determination that assessing restitution would be an unduly complex and time-consuming exercise, based on its conclusions that defendant would be financially unable to satisfy any restitution award and the victims could pursue relief through civil actions. 
  • Increasing Access to Legal Services

    NCVLI is providing training & technical assistance lawyers and law students to enforce victims’ rights.
  • Increasing The Capacity of Legal & Victim Service Providers

    In 2012, the Office for Victims of Crime began funding the creation of legal assistance networks across the country to provide holistic, wraparound, no-cost legal assistance to address the full scope of victims’ needs.  Six Networks were funded.  In 2014, OVC funded a second group of Networks.  By mid-2017 seven of the 10 Networks have completed a methodical process of identifying needs and gaps and designing a Network structure that effectively provides responsive services to victims.  In the first half of 2017, these seven Networks and their 86 partner agencies were available to help 4,075 victims seeking assistance.  The remaining three Networks are beginning services shortly!
  • Indiana Attorney General Victim Assistance

    The Indiana Attorney General’s Office provides services to crime victims, such as confidential addresses for victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse.  Other services include victim notification, compensation, and referrals to other victim resources.
  • Indiana Criminal Justice Institute-Victims Services

    Indiana
    The Victim Assistance Division of the Attorney General’s Office is committed to providing services and assistance to victims of crime. The Indiana Constitution guarantees victims of crime fairness, respect, and dignity. The office sustains that promise by supporting those affected directly, and indirectly, by crime in Indiana. The office provides support by administering the Address Confidentiality and Victim Advocacy Programs.
  • Indiana Prosecuting Attorney’s Council

    Indiana
    The Council assists prosecuting attorneys in their duties by preparing manuals, providing legal research, conducting training seminars, and acting as a liaison with study commissions and agencies of all branches of local, state and federal government that would be of benefit to law enforcement and the fair administration of justice in Indiana.
  • Indiana: Sexual Assault Information, Resources & Support

    AARDVARC.org, Inc. - a non-profit organization dedicated to combating family and relationship violence, sexual violence and child abuse. 
  • Intern Spotlight - Andrew Simon

    Andrew Simon is a second year law student at the University of California Berkeley School of Law who served as one of NCVLI’s Summer 2012 Law Student Interns.
  • Intern Spotlight - Jackson McNeill

    Jackson McNeill is a second year law student at University of California Los Angeles School of Law who served as one of NCVLI’s Summer 2012 Law Student Interns.
  • Intern Spotlight: Bobbie Soto

    Intern Spotlight: Bobbie Soto
  • Intern Spotlight: Courtney Kiehl

    Intern Spotlight: Courtney Kiehl is one of NCVLI’s Legal Interns for the Summer of 2014 and just completed her second year at Pennsylvania State University, Dickinson School of Law.
  • Intern Spotlight: Jared Bordere

    Intern Spotlight: Jared Bordere
  • Intern Spotlight: Jessica Rhodes

    Intern Spotlight: Jessica Rhodes
  • Intern Spotlight: Pauliina Heikkonen

    Intern Spotlight: Pauliina Heikkonen visited from Finland to intern with NCVLi in the Winter of 2016.
  • Intern Spotlight: Tegan Waring

    Intern Spotlight: Tegan Waring is one of NCVLI’s Summer Interns and will start her junior year at Smith College this fall.
  • Intern Spotlight: Whitney Magnuson

    Intern Spotlight: Whitney Magnuson is one of NCVLI’s Legal Interns for the Fall of 2014 and is in her third year at Lewis & Clark School of Law.
  • Internet Crime Complaint Center

    National
    IC3’s mission is to serve as a vehicle to receive, develop, and refer criminal complaints regarding the rapidly expanding arena of cyber crime. The IC3 gives the victims of cyber crime a convenient and easy-to-use reporting mechanism that alerts authorities of suspected criminal or civil violations.
  • Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)

    The IC3 is a collaboration between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Complaint Center (NWC3). The IC3 receives internet-related criminal complaints and refers them to the appropriate law enforcement or regulatory agency for any further investigation. The IC3 website provides an accessible and straight forward complaint form and also has current press releases on internet crime issues.
  • Iowa Attorney General Crime Victim Assistance Division

    (515) 281-5044
    Toll free: (800) 373-5044
    The Iowa Attorney General’s Office operates a Crime Victim Assistance Division (CVAD).  Services of the CVAD include victim notification, assistance with compensation, crisis response, and referrals to statewide victim services such as counseling.
  • Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (800) 284-7821
    The Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault is a private non-profit organization whose mission is to unite people and organizations to promote a society free from sexual violence and to meet the diverse needs of survivors of sexual assault.  Their website has referrals to local support providers statewide.
  • Iowa Crime Victims Compensation Program

    (800) 373-5044
    (515) 281-5044
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, crime scene cleanup, limited replacement of property, and funeral costs.
  • It Happened to Alexa Foundation

    (716) 754-9105
    (877) 77-ALEXA (25392)

    The purpose of the “It Happened to Alexa Foundation” is to help support rape survivors through the trauma of the criminal trial, in the hopes that more survivors will go through with the prosecution in order to put these perpetrators behind bars. Established in 2003, the foundation assists rape victims’ families with travel expenses during the litigation process. 



    is a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization that provides substantial support to survivors who testify against their sexual attackers, and thus encourages them to pursue justice. This organization was founded by the parents of a survivor and gives up to $3,000 to family members and support persons of survivors so that they may attend and support a survivor during their testimony.
  • J.D. v. Hegyi, — P.3d —, No. 1 CA-SA 13-0296, 2014 WL 943145 (Ariz. Ct. App. Mar. 11, 2014)

    Defendant was arrested on charges of sexually abusing the minor-victim, and the victim’s mother asserted victims’ rights on behalf of both her daughter and herself.  Defendant sought and was granted seven trial continuances and the victim turned 18-years-old before trial commenced.  Defendant then sought to compel the victim’s mother to submit to a defense interview, contending that she could no longer refuse an interview by asserting victims’ rights.
  • Jane Does #1 and #2 v. United States, No. 08-80736-CIV-Marra/Johnson (S.D. Fla. Sept. 26, 2011) (order granting in part the victim-plaintiffs’ motion for finding violations of the Crime Victims’ Rights Act).

    Two victim-plaintiffs sued the federal government, claiming violations of their rights under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA), 18 U.S.C. § 3771,  arising from the U.S. Attorney’s Office’s handling of the investigation and prosecution of Jeffrey Epstein, the man who sexually abused plaintiffs while they were minors.
  • Jeff Hanson

    Paralegal Supervisor
  • Jennifer Storm Receives Gail Burns-Smith Excellence in Victim Services Award

    Jennifer Storm is the recipient of the 2012 Gail Burns-Smith Excellence in Victim Services Award.
  • Johanna Borkan

    Victim Advocate
  • Johnson v. Dep’t of Pub. Safety Standards and Training, — P.3d —, No. A147361, 2012 WL 5429461 (Or. Ct. App. Nov. 7, 2012).

    Petitioner, a private investigator whose license was revoked by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), sought judicial review of the revocation order, which was based in part on the determination that petitioner—while working for private criminal defense attorneys—interviewed crime victims without disclosing his true identity and role and without informing the victims of their right to refuse defense interviews.
  • Join NCVLI & the NO MORE Challenge

    Click here to raise your voice for justice for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.
  • Join the Conference Faculty

    Click here to learn how you can present at next year’s Crime Victim Law Conference.
  • Join the Million Rising for Victims’ Rights

    How will you support victims? Join the movement, click here to learn ways to ensure victims’ rights are protected, enforced and advanced.
  • Join us at the Crime Victims’ Rights Reception and Fundraiser

    Join us June 20, 2014 at 4:30pm on the Lewis & Clark Law School campus for the Crime Victims’ Rights Reception and Fundraiser. Generous local and national businesses have generously donated an amazing number of items. Don’t miss out!   Click here to learn more and see a list of auction items.
  • Join Us During Crime Victims’ Rights Week & All Month Long

    Join us as we raise our voices for justice. Click here to learn about events this month.
  • Joining Forces in the Fight for Rights

    Each of us can have an impact on victim law but when we work together it can be truly amazing.  Recently, the Justice League of Ohio took the lead on such a group effort as it worked on a joint amici curiae brief in the case of State v. Shifflet before the Ohio Court of Appeals.  Click here to learn more.
  • Judge receives warning for comments in 2009 rape case

    A Maryland judge receives a warning from the Judicial Oversight Commission after stating that a rape victim’s behavior made the rape “an accident waiting to happen,” among other comments.
  • Justice Derailed

    Justice Derailed




    A 2008 sex-abuse case lingers in federal court as a “manipulative” defendant works the system.

  • Kansas Attorney General Victim Assistance

    Toll free: (800) 828-9745
    The Kansas Attorney General’s Office provides information about the rights of crime victims in Kansas, as well as other services such as victim notification, compensation, and referrals to statewide victim resources.
  • Kansas Crime Victims Compensation Board

    (785) 296-2359
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Kathleen Cady

    Member
  • Kentucky Attorney General Office of Victims Advocacy

    1-800-372-2551
    The Office of Victim’s Services provides victim’s advocates on all criminal appellate and special prosecution cases in the Commonwealth. This office also staffs the Child Sexual Assault and Exploitation Prevention Board and hosts annual training for Victim’s Advocates throughout the Commonwealth.
  • Kentucky Crime Victims Compensation Board

    (502) 573-2290
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Kovaleski v. State, No. SC09-536, — So. 3d —, 2012 WL 5258677 (Fla. Oct. 25, 2012).

    Defendant was convicted of two counts of lewd and lascivious acts on a minor.  During defendant’s retrial in 2006, the trial court partially closed the courtroom during the testimony of the child-victim, in accordance with a statutory provision allowing for partial closure upon the request of any testifying victim of a sex offense.  Defendant appealed, arguing that the statutory closure provision conflicted with the requirements established by the Supreme Court in Waller v. Georgia, 467 U.S. 39 (1984).
  • Lafontant v. State, — A.3d —, No. 1228, 2010 WL 4872249 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Dec. 1, 2010).

    Defendant and the state agreed to a plea bargain on a vehicular manslaughter charge without consulting with the victim’s representative.  The plea was accepted by the trial court.  At a later sentencing hearing, the victim’s representative requested restitution, citing Maryland’s law affording victims the independent right to make a restitution request.  Defendant objected as restitution was not a part of the agreed-to plea.
  • Lambda Legal

    (866) 542-8336
    Lambda Legal is a national organization committed to achieving full recognition of the civil rights of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender people and those with HIV through impact litigation, education and public policy work.
  • Largest Crime Victims’ Rights Reception

    NCVLI held its annual Crime Victims’ Rights Reception on June 7, 2013 at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. The Reception was attended by over 200 people as well as a few guide dog puppies in training. Attendees networked and celebrated with colleagues from around the country while enjoying free food and drink, live music from local band, SloeGinFizz, and a raffle and silent auction.
  • Latest Crime Victim Law Newsletter Released

    The 16th edition of the Newsletter of Crime Victim Law is now available.  To download a PDF version of this publication, click here.  For additional publications related to victims’ rights, visit NCVLI’s online Victim Law Library.
  • Launch of New NAVRA Website

    The National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys (NAVRA) recently launched its new website - www.navra.org.  The website will allow paying NAVRA members access to our database of hundreds of victims’ rights case summaries, sample pleadings, amicus curiae briefs, and much more!  
  • Law aims to help abuse victims

    A Virginia law giving courts the option of requiring certain domestic abusers to wear GPS monitors unanimously passes the House.
  • Law Student Profile: Colette McEldowney

    Colette McEldowney is a second year law student who began interning with NCVLI in the fall of 2010.
  • Law to Alert Victims of Violent Crime Before Parole Hearings

    A recently signed Alabama law will help give victims of violent crimes more notice (30 days) when their attackers are coming up for parole or pardon.
  • Lawyer Representing Crime Victim Held in Contempt, Shining Light on Little-Known Legal Role

  • Lear v. Jamrogowicz, —P.3d—, No. DA 12-0523, 2013 WL 2407196 (Mont. June 4, 2013).

    The victim sought a civil restraining order against defendant for stalking.  She received a temporary order of protection, which was to remain in effect for six months, at which point a hearing would be held to determine if the order should become a permanent order of protection.  Defendant moved to vacate the scheduled hearing to allow her to conduct discovery, and the court granted this request and issued a discovery scheduling order. 
  • Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles

    Since 1929, Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles has provided civil legal services to poor and low-income people in Los Angeles County.

  • Legal Assistance At Your Fingertips

    Read about our recent work.
  • Legal Resource Center on Violence Against Women

    The mission of the Legal Resource Center on Violence Against Women (LRC) is to improve legal representation for domestic violence survivors.  Specifically, the LRC works to obtain legal representation for domestic violence survivors in interstate custody cases and to provide technical assistance to domestic violence victim advocates and attorneys in such cases. 
     
  • Lewis & Clark law professor calls US Supreme Court ruling in child porn case disappointing

    Meg Garvin, a Lewis & Clark law professor and executive director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute, called Wednesday’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling on restitution in a child pornography case a “disappointing outcome for victims nationally.”
  • Lindsey v. State, — A.3d —, No. 495, 2014 WL 4236370 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Aug. 27, 2014).

    The victim in this case was represented by attorneys for the Maryland Crime Victims’ Resource Center, who fought to protect the victim’s right to have the court’s consideration of his restitution request.

    Defendant entered into, and the court accepted, a written plea agreement with the state in which he agreed to plead guilty to one count of attempted robbery with a sentencing cap of 15 years with all but 18 months suspended in exchange for the state dismissing the other counts in the indictment. At sentencing, the victim, who had been shot and seriously injured during the attempted robbery, requested for the first time that defendant be ordered to pay restitution. Defendant objected on the basis that payment of restitution was not included in the plea agreement. The trial court denied the victim’s request, and the victim filed a motion for reconsideration. The trial court denied the victim’s motion on the basis that ordering restitution would be contrary to the plea agreement and an improper increase in sentence. The victim appealed. 

  • Lisa Zauner

    Treasurer; Member of Executive Committee and Finance Committee
  • Local #46 Metallic Lathers Union and Reinforcing Iron Workers and Its Associated Benefit and Other Funds

    Local # 46 Metallic Lathers Union and Reinforcing Iron Workers and its associated benefit and other funds (Local 46 or petitioner), filed a petition for writ of mandamus in the Second Circuit challenging the district court’s determination that it was not a crime victim and therefore not entitled to restitution.
  • Looking for a way to support NCVLI?

    NCVLI is seeking donations of products and services from local and national businesses for our silent auction in June.
  • Los Angeles LGBT Center: Domestic Violence Services

    323-860-5806
    Los Angeles LGBT Center Domestic Violence Services provides direct services to victims of domestic abuse.  Services include LGBTQ sensitive counselors, assistance in obtaining protective orders and legal services, safety planning, and referrals to other services.
  • LOTUS Legal Clinic, Inc.

    (414) 885-1469
    LOTUS Legal Clinic serves victims of gender-based violence and human trafficking through trauma informed legal advocacy, policy initiatives, education, and survivor empowerment. For purposes of our services, gender-based violence refers to crimes of sexual exploitation and violence, which includes rape, sexual assault, sexual harm, sexual abuse and sex trafficking. LOTUS Legal Clinic serves survivors of every sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, nationality, race, religion, ability, and socioeconomic status. we speak English and Spanish.
  • Louisiana Crime Victims Reparations Board

    (225) 342-1749
    (888) 6-VICTIM
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, child care, crime scene cleanup, and funeral costs.
  • Loveisrespect (formerly National Dating Abuse Helpline)

    Chat at www.loveisrespect.org
    Text loveis to 22522*
    (866) 331-9474
    (866) 331-8453 TTY
    Loveisrespect, formerly the National Dating Abuse Helpline, offers support, information and advocacy to young people who have questions or concerns about their dating relationships and provides information and support to concerned friends and family members, teachers, counselors, service providers and members of law enforcement. Free and confidential phone, live chat and texting services are available 24/7/365. 
  • Maine Coalition to End Domestic Violence

    (866) 834-HELP
    MCEDV is a coalition of advocacy programs for victims of domestic violence and stalking.  Their website and 24-hour hotline, (866) 834-4357, provide referrals to local support services for victims throughout the state, including shelter programs.
  • Maine Crime Victims Compensation Program

    (800) 903-7882
    (207) 624-7882
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, crime scene cleanup, and funeral costs.
  • Make strangulation a felony, state attorney general says

    Oregon’s Attorney General seeks public support for proposed legislation that would make strangulation a felony.  It is currently a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 30 days in jail. 
  • MaleSurvivor

    Male Survivor provides victims of sexual violence with information for finding local resources, therapists, and support groups, along with general information about male victimization and forums where victims can talk to and provide support for each other.

  • Maryland Attorney General Victim Services

    (888) 743-0023
    The Maryland Attorney General’s Office provides information to crime victims and citizens regarding victims’ rights and the criminal justice system.  The office also serves victims through notification of case disposition and offender custody.
  • Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (301) 328-7168
    The Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MCASA) is the statewide coalition of sexual assault resource centers.  Their website has referrals to local support providers statewide.
  • Maryland Criminal Injuries Compensation Board

    (410) 585-3010
    (888) 679-9347
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence

    (301) 429-3601
    (800) MD-HELPS
    MNADV is a coalition of advocacy programs for victims of domestic violence and stalking in Maryland.  Their website has referrals to local support providers throughout the state, including shelter services.
  • Massachusetts Attorney General Victim Services

    The Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office provides information about the rights of crime victims and referrals to statewide victim assistance and resources.
  • Massachusetts Victims of Violent Crime Compensation Program

    (617) 727-2200
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Meaningful Protection

    In a recent case in Oregon, the appellate court in denied restitution, stating certain expenses incurred by the victim were not a result of the defendant’s conduct. Click here to read more.
  • Meeting The Challenge To Get Loud

    This past year we asked: What can we accomplish if we raise our voices for justice? We challenged ourselves to get loud, be heard, and make a difference for victims. The
    community rose to the challenge! Click here to read our latest annual report.
  • Meg Garvin Receives National Leadership Award

    On August 1, 2015, NCVLI Executive Director Meg Garvin was presented with Parents of Murdered Children’s John W. Gillis Leadership Award. Click here to read more.
  • Mentoring the Next Generation

    Click here to see how students assist with every aspect of our work.
  • Michigan - MI House Passes Bill To Support Crime Victims Rights Fund

    State Representative Tonya Schuitmaker on Tuesday applauded House passage of a bill that she co-sponsored to strengthen Michigan’s Crime Victims Rights Fund.
  • Michigan Crime Victims Compensation Assistance

    (517) 373-7373
    Victim only: (877) 251-7373
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Michigan Victim Alliance

    Michigan
    The Michigan Victim Alliance is a non-profit organization dedicated to the healing and protection of victims of violence, trauma, and abuse. Our mission focuses on meeting the needs of victims rather than on revenge, and we recognize that communication is the key in allowing the voices of victims to be heard. Our goals also include educating ourselves and the public on ways to help policymakers, community decision-makers, and the criminal justice system become more effective and more responsive to the needs of victims. To further these goals, the MVA develops partnerships with the broad spectrum of Michigan victim organizations and other groups that want to work with us to make Michigan a safer place in which to live and work.
  • Minnesota - Advocates applaud judge’s call for child porn victim restitution

    Minnesota - Advocates applaud judge’s call for child porn victim restitution
  • Minnesota Alliance on Crime (MAC)

    (612) 940-8090
    Toll free: (866) 940-8090

    MAC is a membership coalition of more than 60 crime victim service providers in Minnesota, including prosecution-based victim/witness programs, community programs, law enforcement agencies, and individuals committed to supporting crime victims.
  • Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women

    (866) 223-1111
    The Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women [MCBW] is a well-established, membership organization with over 80 member programs located throughout Minnesota with a strong history of effectively carrying out programming that advances women’s safety and security.
  • Minnesota Crime Victim Legal Services Project

    Minnesota Crime Victim Legal Services Project (MN-CVLS)
  • Mississippi Attorney General Victim Services

    The Mississippi Attorney General’s Office provides information on crime victims’ rights in the state, as well as referrals to resources and services for victims.
  • Mississippi Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (601) 948-0555
    Toll-free: (888) 987-9011

    The Mississippi Coalition Against Sexual Assault represents the nine rape crisis centers in the state of Mississippi.  Their website has referrals to these local centers that provide support to victims of sexual violence.
  • Missouri Attorney General Victim Services

    (573) 751-0309
    The Missouri Attorney General’s Office provides information concerning the rights of crime victims in Missouri.  The office also provides services including victim notification and referrals to advocates and statewide victim resources.
  • Missouri Crime Victims’ Compensation Fund

    (800) 347-6881
    (573) 526-6006
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Mixed Message From U.S. Supreme Court to Crime Victims

    The United States Supreme Court issued its opinion today in a long continuing case that NCVLI has been involved with since 2009.  The decision, which involves the proper scope of financial recovery for a victim in a child-abuse image case (aka child pornography cases), is unfortunately one of mixed messages and new hurdles for victims across the country.
  • Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

    The Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence represents over 50 programs across Montana that provide direct services to victims and survivors of domestic and sexual violence and their children.  Their website has referrals to local sexual assault support providers and domestic violence shelter programs.
  • Montana Office of Victims Services (OVS)

    Montana, USA
    The Office of Victim Services (OVS): seeks to elevate the status of victims and their rights; serves as a central reference point for victims of crime, and offers information and referrals; provides training and information for those who work with victims, including law enforcement, victim advocates, probation and parole workers and local community organizations
  • More support on way for service victims

    More support on way for service victims
  • Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

    (800) 438-6233
    The mission of MADD is to stop drunk driving, support the victims of this violent crime and prevent underage drinking.  Their website offers resources to victims and survivors of drunk driving including a forum for victims to chat.  They also have a victim assistance hotline: 1-877-MADD-HELP (1-877-623-3435).
  • Multnomah County Crisis Line

    (503) 988-4888
    Toll free: (800) 716-9769
    The Mental Health Call Center is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week and serves those in Mulnomah County.
  • National Association of Crime Victim Compensation Boards

     
    The National Association of Crime Victim Compensation Boards is an organization that advocates for and supports the right of crime victims to compensation.  Their website provides links to each state’s victim compensation program.
  • National Black Prosecutors Association

    USA
    It is the only professional membership organization dedicated to the advancement of Blacks as prosecutors providing education and leadership in the legal profession through its intensive training sessions and multi-disciplined networking.
  • National Center for Lesbian Rights

    (800) 528-6257
    (415) 392-6257
    NCLR is a national legal organization committed to advancing the civil and human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families through litigation, legislation, policy, and public education.
  • National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse

    USA
    Aimed at responding to reported child abuse,it provides training, technical assistance and publications to professionals on all aspects of criminal child abuse and exploitation.
  • National Center for Prosecution of Violence Against Women

    (703) 549-4253
    (703) 836-3195
    To improve the quality of justice in violence against women prosecutions by increasing awareness of the dynamics of victimization, identifying best prosecution practices, developing research and reference resources and providing training and technical assistance at the national, regional and local levels for prosecutors, law enforcement and other allied professionals.
  • National Center for Victims of Crime: Stalking Publication Series

    The National Center for Victims of Crimes provides several publications with advice and self-help instructions for victims of stalking.  Information such as how to formulate a safety plan or collect evidence is available online at their website.
  • National Children’s Alliance Child Advocacy Centers

    Child Advocacy Centers emphasize the coordination of investigation and intervention services by bringing together professionals and agencies as a multidisciplinary team to create a child-focused approach to child abuse cases.  Use the “Find a local National Children’s Alliance Member Location” on their website for referrals to services.
  • National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV)

    (800) 799 SAFE
    (800) 787 3224 (TTY)
    NCADV provides unique services to victims of domestic violence such as cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and financial education.  NCVADV also operates the Remember My Name Project to memorialize people who have died as a result of domestic violence.
  • National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs

    National
    NCAVP is a coalition of programs that document and advocate for victims of anti-LGBT and anti-HIV/AIDS violence/harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, police misconduct and other forms of victimization.  Their website has a list of more than 40 local anti-violence programs.
  • National Council on Child Abuse and Family Violence

    (800) 677-1116
    National Council on Child Abuse and Family Violence (NCCAFV) works to provide prevention services by bringing together community and national stakeholders, volunteers and professionals to prevent child abuse and neglect, spouse/partner abuse, and elder abuse and neglect.
  • National Crime Victim Law Institute - Responding to Online Fraud Project

    (888) 768-6556
    NCVLI’s Responding to Online Fraud Project has links to resources for victims such as prevention tips, information on reporting online fraud, and a toll free victim assistance hotline at 1-888-768-6556.  















  • National Crime Victims’ Rights Week: April 22nd-28th

    Each April since 1981, the federal Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) has designated a “National Crime Victims’ Rights Week” (NCVRW).  The purpose of NCVRW is to increase awareness of victims’ rights, honor crime victims, and aid those who advocate on their behalf.   Learn what NCVLI is doing during the month of April to commemorate NCVRW and how you can get involved.
  • National Disability Rights Network

    NDRN is the nonprofit membership organization for the federally mandated Protection and Advocacy (P&A) Systems and Client Assistance Programs (CAP). There is a P&A/CAP agency in every state and U.S. territory as well as one serving the Native American population in the four corners region.  Collectively, the P&A/CAP network is the largest provider of legally based advocacy services to people with disabilities in the United States.
  • National District Attorneys Association

    (703) 549-9222
    (703) 836-3195
    It is the oldest and largest professional organization representing criminal prosecutors in the world.It has a educational research institute.
  • National Hispanic Prosecuters Association

    USA
    It is the only professional membership organization dedicated to the advancement of Hispanics as prosecutors providing education and trainings.
  • National Human Trafficking Resource Center Hotline

    1-888-373-7888

    The National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC) is a national, toll-free hotline, available to answer calls from anywhere in the country, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, every day of the year. They are not a government entity, law enforcement or an immigration authority.

     

  • National Juvenile Justice Prosecution Center

    (703) 549-4253
    (703) 836-3195
    It provides training and technical assistance to juvenile court prosecutors and to promote adoption of a balanced philosophical approach to juvenile justice. It pursues its mission by conducting national, regional, and local training events, by producing publications, and by providing technical assistance to prosecutors.
  • National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children

    USA
    POMC® provides the on-going emotional support needed to help parents and other survivors facilitate the reconstruction of a “new life” and to promote a healthy resolution. Not only does POMC help survivors deal with their acute grief but also helps with the criminal justice system.
  • National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC)

    (717) 909-0715
    Toll Free: (877) 739-3895
    TTY: (717) 909-0715
    The NSVRC does not provide direct services to sexual assault victims but rather supports those who do, such as coalitions and rape crisis centers.  A database of organizations that provide direct services is available on the NSVRC website.
  • National Traffic Law Center

    (703) 549-4253
    (703) 836-3195
    It improves the quality of justice in traffic safety adjudications by increasing the awareness of highway safety issues through the compilation, creation and dissemination of legal and technical information and by providing training and reference services.
  • NAVRA Member Profile: Crime Victim Advocacy Center of Tulare County - Amy Terrible and Layli Caborn

    Amy Terrible and Layli Caborn are victims’ rights lawyers and National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys (NAVRA) members who represent victims of crime in Central California.  This March they will launch a nonprofit organization to grow their work for victims, the Crime Victim Advocacy Center of Tulare County, California.
  • NCVLI & OCVLC Host Community Open House

    On September 1st, NCVLI and our partner clinic, the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center (OCVLC), hosted an Open House for the community to learn about how to get involved with victims’ rights.  Speakers included Lewis & Clark Law School Dean Robert Klonoff, NCVLI Executive Director Meg Garvin, OCVLC Legal Director Janine Robben, and community members who have donated time as interns and pro bono attorneys.  To learn more and see the pictures from this event, click here.
  • NCVLI Alumni Newsletter, Second Edition - Spring 2009

    Contact the NCVLI office for story ideas.
    PDF of NCVLI Alumni Newsletter, Second Edition - Spring 2009
  • NCVLI and Lewis & Clark Law School Student Groups Host Presentation on Holistic Services for Domestic Violence Victims

    On November 30th, NCVLI, with support from Lewis & Clark Law School student groups the Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance and the Women’s Law Caucus, hosted a presentation educating students about the resources available to domestic violence victims and best practices in providing holistic services.  The event was hosted as a round table discussion and featured professionals from the legal, mental health, and social services worlds, each with deep experience in helping victims of domestic violence.
  • NCVLI Announces Advisory Council

    Today, the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) announced the formation of its national Advisory Council.  The Council was formed as part of NCVLI’s strategic plan as it begins its fifteenth year as the only national organization focused on protecting, enforcing and advancing crime victims’ legal rights. Click here to read the press release.
  • NCVLI Announces New Board Member

    NCVLI is excited to announce that Jennifer Storm has joined its Board of Directors.
  • NCVLI Assists in Interpreting Victims’ Rights in Juvenile Court

    NCVLI recently provided legal research and analysis regarding victims’ right to access information regarding consequences imposed on offenders in juvenile delinquency proceedings.  Click here to learn more.
  • NCVLI Assists in Securing Victory for Child-Victim Privacy

    NCVLI recently provided legal research and analysis in support of a Florida prosecutor’s motion for a protective order to prevent a defendant in a case involving child abuse images from discovering the identities of the victims depicted.
  • NCVLI Board Member Profile: Sean Riddell

    NCVLI Board Member Profile: Sean Riddell
  • NCVLI Board Member Spotlight: Carl Davis

    Board Member Carl Davis shares how he became involved with NCVLI and what he finds important about victims’ rights.
  • NCVLI Board Member Spotlight: Sarah Geary Gustafson

    Board Member Sarah Geary Gustafson shares what she would like to see changed for victims of crime and why others should get involved with victims’ rights.
  • NCVLI Celebrates Success in Efforts to Protect Victim Privacy

    In a case involving a horrific shooting spree in Hawaii, NCVLI submitted an amicus brief urging the court to keep 911 tapes made by or about victims out of the media in an effort to protect victims’ state constitutional right to privacy.
  • NCVLI Clinic Cluster Meeting Generates a Buzz

    On Tuesday, April 26th, the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) held its all-clinic victims’ rights enforcement meeting in Denver, Colorado.
  • NCVLI Endorses National Cyber Security Awareness Month

    October marks the seventh annual National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM).  This campaign urges individuals, families, schools, businesses, and governments to learn how to protect individual computers, and through this shared effort, protect the country’s cyber infrastructure.  NCVLI recognizes that computer users’ safety and security online is increasingly compromised by fraud-related crime.  In response, NCVLI is addressing this growing issue through our recently launched Responding to Online Fraud Project.
  • NCVLI Fights for a Victim’s Right for Appellate Review!

    NCVLI recently fought for a victims’ right for appellate review by joining as amicus in a case involving a victim’s right to proceedings free from unreasonable delay and to fairness.
  • NCVLI Fights for Victims’ Right to be Present as an Individual, Enforceable Right

    For many victims, the option to be present at and participate in criminal proceedings is a critical step in beginning to heal from the crime.  Like all victims’ rights, this is an individual right, one which victims should have the opportunity to exercise if they so choose.  Unfortunately, victims are routinely denied their right to be present.  NCVLI recently submitted an amicus brief in an Oregon case involving a victim’s right to be present.  Click here to learn more.
  • NCVLI Founder Travels the World Lecturing on Victims’ Rights

    NCVLI founder and Lewis & Clark Law School Professor, Doug Beloof, is lecturing on and researching victims’ rights in Turkey, Japan, Australia and India.
  • NCVLI Hosts 12th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference

    On Friday and Saturday, June 7-8, NCVLI hosted the 12th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference in Portland, Oregon.  More than 200 attorneys, advocates, and others committed to victims’ rights gathered to learn from the leading experts in the field and engage in conversations to shape the future of the victims’ rights movement.
  • NCVLI Hosts First Vision 21 Forum

    On January 19th and 20th, NCVLI convened a group of stakeholders from all over the country to begin a conversation about the future of victims’ services.   Amazing dialogue took place about how to better meet the needs of victims and how to form productive partnerships among various areas of the field.  Vision 21 will continue to develop in the coming months.  
  • NCVLI Hosts Successful 10th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference

    NCVLI’s Crime Victim Law Conference took place in Portland, Oregon from June 14-15, 2011.  NCVLI was honored to have amazing speakers again this year, including Susan Levy, mother of Chandra Levy, and her attorney Jani Tillery; Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court Paul J. De Muniz; author and lecturer Irvin Waller; victims’ rights icons Meg Garvin, Paul Cassell, and Doug Beloof; former United States Attorney Diane Humetewa; and many more.  Thanks to all who attended for making the Conference a success!
  • NCVLI Hosts Webinar on Rape Shield - Recording Available!

    On Wednesday, May 15th NCVLI Executive Director Meg Garvin and NCVLI Violence Against Women Project Director Ali Wilkinson hosted a webinar titled “Intersection of Victims’ Rights and Rape Shield.”  Wonderfully, the webinar was attended by over 80 practitioners from around the country!  The presentation outlined the history of rape shield, provided a snapshot of some of the most troublesome issues seen in rape shield litigation today, and also armed practitioners with practical tips about how victims’ rights provisions can be leveraged to allow victim participation in rape shield proceedings and create avenues for appellate review.  Click here to learn more and to watch and listen to a recording of the webinar.
  • NCVLI Joins Coalition Seeking Guidance on Gender-Biased Policing

    NCVLI has joined a coalition of 186 organizations asking the US Department of Justice to issue guidance on gender-biased policing of sexual assault and domestic violence cases. Click here to learn more.
  • NCVLI Joins Sexual Assault Victim to Fight for Her Right to Privacy

    NCVLI recently submitted an amicus brief in an Alaska case where the trial court granted a defendant’s pretrial discovery motion and ordered the victim to disclose sensitive, confidential, and privileged health care information including information related to possible mental health and substance abuse treatment.  In our brief we urged the court to recognize a sexual assault victim’s constitutional rights to privacy and and to be treated with dignity, respect, and fairness.
  • NCVLI Launches New Child-Victimization Project

    Last month NCVLI officially launched our new Safeguarding Child-Victims’ Rights Initiative!  Children victimized by crime are one of the most vulnerable victim populations and, as a result, they face unique hurdles to accessing justice.  Through this new Initiative, NCVLI will undertake a number of activities that will help attorneys provide effective legal representation to child-victims. More information on the Initiative will be available soon.
  • NCVLI LiveWhale Guide (click Preview to read)

    ***DO NOT DELETE*** This is to remain hidden.
  • NCVLI Participates as Amicus Curiae in Sandusky Case

    NCVLI, along with the National Center for Victims of Crime, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, and several other victims’ rights advocacy groups, recently submitted an amicus curiae brief in the Sandusky case.  In the brief, NCVLI and its partners argue that the victims should be allowed to proceed by pseudonym for the duration of the trial to protect the victims’ fundamental rights to privacy, protection, and access to the courts.
  • NCVLI Participates in National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims

    On Friday, September 23rd NCVLI joined the Greater Portland Chapter of Parents of Murdered Children (POMC) to commemorate the National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims.  To see the photo gallery from this event, click here.
  • NCVLI Presents Anne Seymour with the 2011 Victim Advocacy Award

    Anne Seymour is the 2011 winner of NCVLI’s Victim Advocacy Award for her commitment to advancing victims’ rights. 
  • NCVLI Protects the Rights of Victims of Online and Computer-Related Crimes

    Recently, NCVLI announced a project designed to take victims’ rights enforcement international!  Responding to Online Fraud seeks to increase awareness of and provide support for all victims of online and computer-related crimes.  Click here for more information about the Project and to learn about online and computer-related crimes.
  • NCVLI Receives Award from United States Department of Justice

    National Crime Victims’ Rights Week is a time for communities around the country to raise awareness of crime victims’ rights.  As part of this commemoration, every year the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) recognizes individuals and organizations for outstanding work devoted to crime victims through the National Crime Victims’ Service Awards.  NCVLI is proud to announce that OVC honored NCVLI with one of these awards, in the Crime Victims’ Rights Award category.  This award honors efforts to advance or enforce crime victims’ rights at the state, tribal, or national level.  NCVLI accepted this award in a ceremony presided over by Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday, April 24th, 2013 in Washington D.C.
  • NCVLI Recognized for Innovation in Addressing Domestic Violence

    NCVLI is proud to announce that our Responding to Violence Against Women Project was selected to receive the 2013 Mary Byron Foundation Celebrating Solutions Award.  This important award honors nonprofit and governmental organizations with innovative programs that demonstrate promise in ending the generational cycle of domestic violence.
  • NCVLI Staff Profile - Katie Bucko

    NCVLI Staff Profile - Katie Bucko
  • NCVLI Staff Profile - William McMillen

    NCVLI Staff Profile - William McMillen
  • NCVLI Staff Profile: Ellen Dully

    NCVLI Staff Profile: Ellen Dully
  • NCVLI Staff Profile: Margaret Schimming

    NCVLI Staff Profile: Margaret Schimming
  • NCVLI Staff Profile: Rufio

    NCVLI Staff Profile: Rufio
  • NCVLI Staff Profile: Susanne Falenczykowski

    NCVLI Staff Profile: Susanne Falenczykowski
  • NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Bernette Jenkins-Pleas

    NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Bernette Jenkins-Pleas
  • NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Julie Hester

    NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Julie Hester
  • NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Sarah LeClair

    NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Sarah LeClair
  • NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Terry Campos

    NCVLI Staff Spotlight: Terry Campos
  • NCVLI Submits Amicus Brief to the Washington Court of Appeals

    NCVLI submitted an amicus curiae brief to the Washington Court of Appeals arguing that  victims and other witnesses cannot be compelled to give a recorded interview to defense counsel in a criminal case because the practice violates the victim’s constitutional and statutory rights, and also re-victimizes the victims.
  • NCVLI Welcomes Former Chief Justice of Oregon State Supreme Court to Board of Directors

    This month, Honorable Paul De Muniz joined NCVLI’s Board of Directors.  NCVLI is proud to welcome a new member to our Board and honored that our leadership includes someone with such rich judicial experience.  Click here to read more about this newest member of our Board!
  • NCVLI/NAVRA Update: Specialized Training in Colorado on Serving Child-Victims

    NCVLI’s Safeguarding Child-Victims’ Rights Initiative facilitated another successful specialized two-day training on serving child-victims of crime!  The second installment in this series of trainings was provided May 31-June 1 in Boulder, Colorado at the University of Colorado Law School.  
  • NCVLI’s Online Store Is Now Open!

    Visit the NCVLI Store to buy survivor-inspired jewelry and NCVLI logoed items. Click here to visit the store now!
  • Nebraska Crime Victim Reparation Services

    (402) 471-2828
    (800) 833-7352
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Nebraska Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition

    (877)215-0167
    The Nebraska Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Coalition is a statewide advocacy organization committed to the prevention and elimination of sexual and domestic violence.  Their website has referrals to local victim support providers statewide.
  • Nevada Crisis Call Center - Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS)

    (775) 784-8090
    Toll Free: (800) 273-8255

    The Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) advocacy team provides immediate crisis intervention services for survivors of sexual assault, their family members and friends. The SASS program can provide information regarding medical treatment and reporting to law enforcement.  We are also able to assist with referrals for financial assistance and long term counseling services.  All services provided by the SASS program are free and confidential.

  • Nevada Victims of Crime

    The Nevada Attorney General’s Office provides a list of many victim advocacy services statewide.
  • New & Noteworthy Court Opinion: Kovaleski v. State, No. SC09-536, — So. 3d —, 2012 WL 5258677 (Fla. Oct. 25, 2012).

    Defendant was convicted of two counts of lewd and lascivious acts on a minor.  During defendant’s retrial in 2006, the trial court partially closed the courtroom during the testimony of the child-victim, in accordance with a statutory provision allowing for partial closure upon the request of any testifying victim of a sex offense.
  • New & Noteworthy Court Opinion: People v. Stanley

    Defendant pled no contest to felony vandalism of the victim’s pickup truck, and the trial court ordered $2,812.94 in restitution—the amount an automotive body shop estimated it would cost to repair the extensive damage caused by defendant’s criminal conduct.  Defendant appealed, arguing that the trial court should have capped restitution at $950, the price the victim originally paid for the used truck. NCVLI participated in this proceeding as amicus curiae, arguing to protect a victim’s right to restitution. Click above to learn more about this case.
  • New & Noteworthy Court Opinion: United States v. Fair, — F.3d —, No. 09-3120, 2012 WL 5457679 (D.C. Cir. Nov. 9, 2012)

    Defendant, convicted of criminal copyright infringement and mail fraud for the sale of pirated copies of outdated software, appealed the district court’s order of almost $750,000 in restitution to the corporate victim under the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act.
  • New and Noteworthy

    Read cases of interest NCVLI follows. Click here for archived cases.

    Become a member of NCVLI’s membership association, the National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys (NAVRA), to receive timely email updates of New & Noteworthy court opinions and to access a comprehensive database of victims’ rights related case summaries. Visit www.navra.org to learn more.

  • New Demonstration Project Partnership Announced

    NCVLI Partners with the International Association of Chiefs of Police to Strengthen Law Enforcement Response to Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking

  • New Hampshire Office of Victim/Witness Assistance

    (603) 271-3671
    The New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office of Victim/Witness Assistance provides support and resources to victims of crime statewide.  Services include information about the criminal justice system, victim notification, courtroom advocacy, intervention with employers or landlords, and referrals to other resources for victims.
  • New Illinois Anti-Stalking Law: the Stalking No Contact Order Act

    A new Illinois law goes into effect to remedy a gap in stalking protective orders.  Previously, victims had to be in a domestic relationship with the perpetrator or be a victim of the perpetrator’s sexual assault.  Under the new law, those who did not have a previous relationship with the offender and those who were not a victim of sexual assault can seek a stalking no contact order.
  • New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (800) 601-7200
    The mission of the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault is to promote the compassionate and just treatment of survivors, their loved ones and significant others, and to foster collaborative relationships.  Their website has referrals to local support providers for victims of sexual violence statewide.
  • New Jersey Crime Victims’ Law Center

    (973) 903-9848
    The New Jersey Crime Victims’ Law Center provides pro bono legal representation to all victims of violent crimes in state and federal proceedings in New Jersey and serves as an important resource to victims, social services providers, courts, and criminal justice professionals in each of the 21 counties throughout the State of New Jersey.
  • New law requires colleges to teach about sexual assault

    A new state law requires that Pennsylvania schools provide sexual assault prevention programs on college campuses. 
  • New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    The New Mexico Coalition Against Domestic Violence provides statewide leadership as a voice for victims and survivors of domestic violence and the programs that serve them. Their website has referrals to direct victims services statewide including shelters.
  • New Mexico Crime Victims Reparation Commission

    (800) 306-6262
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • New Mexico Victim Services

    (866) 627-3249
    The Victim Services Division is committed to offering resources and support to victims of crime and their families. The website provides links to services for victims of crime, domestic violence and sexual assault.
  • New Post-Conviction Toolkit Resources

  • New Publication Resource on Secondary Victimization

    Read NCVLI’s latest, Bulletin publication, Polyvictims: Victims’ Rights Enforcement as a Tool to Mitigate “Secondary Victimization” in the Criminal Justice System.Victim Law Bulletins provide in-depth analysis of important topics relating to the assertion and enforcement of crime victims’ rights and offer practice tips. Additional resources on victim law can be found on NCVLI’s Victim Law Library and on NAVRA’s Website.
  • New Quicktool Available

    A new Quicktool on the right to privacy is now available. Click here to watch this and Quicktools on other victims’ rights.
  • New Resource for Serving Child-Victims

    Just this week, NCVLI published its latest Child-Victim Bulletin titled, “Seeking Release Conditions and Protective Orders That Benefit Child-Victims”.  Nearly all defendants are released from custody at some point during the criminal justice process, and the prospect of release can be frightening for child-victims and their families.  This Bulletinexamines common release conditions and protective orders that may be sought by child-victims, which can help ensure the protection of child-victims and mitigate the trauma and fear associated with a defendant’s release.
  • New Resource on Serving Child-Victims of Crime

    NCVLI’s Safeguarding Child-Victims’ Rights Initiative just released a new Child-Victims’ Rights Bulletin.  This resource examines the structure of statutes establishing who may assert child-victims’ rights in criminal proceedings and provides tips to assist practitioners representing child-victims.
  • New Training Available on NAVRA Website

     On February 15th, NCVLI and the National Alliance of Victims’ Rights Attorneys (NAVRA) launched the 2012 Training Series with the webinar presentation “Protecting Victims from Re-Victimization: Securing Testimonial Accommodations.”  This training is now available on the NAVRA website.  This database of victims’ rights trainings on the NAVRA website is just one of many benefits available to NAVRA members!  Visit www.navra.org to learn more.
  • New Video About NCVLI and Victims’ Rights!

    We are excited to announce the release of a new video about NCVLI and victims’ rights! Get informed about the importance of rights for crime victims and then help us spread the word by sharing this video with family and friends.  Let’s make 2013 the year we make victims’ rights a reality!
  • New White Paper Published - Child-Victims: Better Served By A Traditional Attorney Or By A Guardian Ad Litem?

    To better assist victims’ rights attorneys and advocates working with child-victims of  crime, NCVLI publishes white papers that are intended to provide a critical analysis on important child-victim rights related topics. 
  • New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault

    (212) 514-SAFE (7233)
    The mission of the New York City Alliance Against Sexual Assault is to prevent sexual violence and reduce the harm it causes through education, research and advocacy.
  • New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG)

    (212) 613-5000
    NYLAG provides free legal services to low-income New York residents.  Their VAWA/U-Visa Project assists immigrant victims of domestic violence, while their Assistance to Victims of Immigration Fraud project works to assist immigrant victims of unethical legal representatives.
  • New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (800) 942-6906
    The New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault works with local, state, and national organizations all of whom are dedicated to ending sexual violence.  Their website has referrals to local service and support providers for victims of sexual violence throughout the state.
  • New York State Victim Legal Assistance Network

    New York State Victim Legal Assistance Network
  • New York: Safe Horizons

    (800) 621-4673
    Safe Horizon provides a variety of resources and support to victims of crime.  Programs and services include counseling, shelter, and legal advocacy.
  • North Carolina Attorney General Victim Services

    The North Carolina Office of the Attorney General provides information regarding the rights of victims of crime and the criminal justice system in North Carolina.
  • North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault

    (919) 871-1015
    The North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault is an inclusive, statewide alliance working to end sexual violence through education, advocacy, and legislation.  Their website has referrals to local service and support providers for victims of sexual violence throughout the state.
  • North Carolina Victim Assistance Network

    North Carolina, USA
    North Carolina Victim Assistance Network promotes the rights and needs of crime victims by educating North Carolina’s citizens and public policy leaders about the devastating impact that crime has on our society. Serving our members as a statewide network, we provide information on over 1,500 victims service and criminal justice agencies, victim assistance programs, and advocacy groups
  • North Dakota Crime Victim Compensation Board

    (800) 445-2322
    (701) 328-6195
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • November Volunteer Day

    Join NCVLI for the November Volunteer Day! RSVP (ncvli@lclark.edu) so that we know how much food to have available. 
  • Obama launches initiatives to fight domestic violence

    President Obama announces an administration-wide effort to combat domestic violence, combining improved legal protections, housing, health and financial assistance for victims.
  • Office for Victims of Crime

    The Office for Victims of Crime website provides a comprehensive database designed to help individuals locate non-emergency crime victim service agencies in the United States and abroad. Searchable by location, type of victimization, agency type and/or type of service needed, this resource is available for victims to guide their search for support.
  • Office on Violence Against Women (DOJ)

    (202) 307-6026
    (202) 305-2589
    The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, provides national leadership in developing the nation’s capacity to reduce violence against women through the implementation of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Created in 1995, OVW administers financial and technical assistance to communities across the country that are developing programs, policies, and practices aimed at ending domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Currently, OVW administers two formula grant program and 17 discretionary grant programs, which were established under VAWA and subsequent legislation. Since its inception, OVW has awarded nearly $4 billion in grants and cooperative agreements, and has launched a multifaceted approach to implementing VAWA. By forging state, local, and tribal partnerships among police, prosecutors, victim advocates, health care providers, faith leaders, and others, OVW grant programs help provide victims with the protection and services they need to pursue safe and healthy lives, while simultaneously enabling communities to hold offenders accountable for their violence.
  • Ohio Attorney General Victim Services

    (614) 466-4986
    Toll free: (800) 282-0515
    The Ohio Attorney General’s Office provides services to victims such as notification of case disposition and compensation.  Their website has referrals to many local victim services providers, advocates, and statewide resources.
  • Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center

    (614) 848-8500

    The Ohio Crime Victim Justice Center provides free legal assistance to victims of crime to protect and enforce their rights from the time of first report through post release control. Free legal representation is also provided in state and federal court. In addition this program provides free victims rights training to nurses, advocates, law enforcement, prosecutors, courts, counselors, and community organizations, and resource referrals  throughout Ohio.

  • Ohio Victim Witness Association

    Ohio, USA
    OVWA is a statewide advocacy organization that is committed to establishing, protecting and promoting fundamental rights and fair and professional treatment for and provision of quality services victims and witnesses of crime.
  • Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

    (800) 522-7233
    The Oklahoma Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault works to empower victims and eliminate violence by providing education and prevention information, supporting member programs, and expanding quality services to all.  Their website has referrals to local victim service and support providers including shelters and rape crisis centers.
  • Oklahoma Victims Services Division

    Oklahoma, USA
    Offering information, resources, and financial assistance to crime victims and the organizations who serve them.
  • Oregon - Victims represented by NCVLI’s partner clinic, the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center in important post-conviction hearing

    NCVLI’s partner clinic, the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center, and pro bono attorney Olufunmike Owoso successfully supported the family members of a homicide victim in exercising their rights to be present & heard and in enforcing their right to reasonable protection in a post-conviction hearing.  
  • Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

    (503) 230-1951
    The Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence (OCADSV) is a non-profit organization made up victim advocates in Oregon.  Their website has referrals to local service and support providers for victims of sexual violence, domestic abuse, and stalking throughout the state, including rape crisis centers and shelters.
  • Oregon Crime Victims Law Center

    (503) 208-8160
    The Oregon Crime Victims Law Center represents crime victims in state and federal courts in the exercise of their rights.  The Clinic also responds to victims’ social service needs in cooperation with other service providers and conducts education and training on victims’ rights issues.
  • Oregon Crime Victims United

    Oregon, USA
    To promote a more balanced justice system through legislative action and public awareness. Crime Victims United was founded in 1983 to advance the rights of crime victims and enhance the safety of all law-abiding Oregonians by addressing problems in Oregon’s criminal justice system. Through the tireless efforts of many volunteers, most of them victims of violent crime, much progress has been made toward fulfilling our mission.
  • Oregon Crime Victims’ Services Division

    (503) 378-5348
    The mission of the Crime Victims’ Services Division (CVSD) is to reduce the impact of crime on victims’ lives by supporting statewide victim services programs, promoting victims’ rights, and providing victims access to information and resources in a compassionate, responsive, and dedicated manner.

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  • Oregon Law Help

    Oregonlawhelp.org has information for civil legal issues. Choose a topic from their menu to find articles, forms, courts, where to find legal help, and more.

  • Oregon parole board changes its mind; will allow victims of rapist Richard Gillmore to speak at hearing

    Oregon parole board changes its mind; will allow victims of rapist Richard Gillmore to speak at hearing
  • Oregon State Bar

    (503) 684-3763 
    Toll Free: (800) 452-7636
    While the Oregon State Bar cannot provide any legal advice or answer any legal questions, they can refer you to a lawyer who may be able to assist you with your legal matter.
  • Oregon Supreme Court Upholds Rape Shield Provision

    On Thursday, July 25th the Oregon Supreme Court upheld Oregon’s rape shield provision allowing for in camera hearings.  NCVLI filed an amicus brief in this case in an effort to preserve the privacy of sexual assault victims.  To read media coverage of this case, click here and here.  Click here to read NCVLI’s summary of the court opinion.
  • OregonCrimeVictimsRights.org

    (800) 503-7983
    Operated by the Oregon Department of Justice, oregoncrimevictimrights.org has information for crime victims in Oregon on a variety of topics, including information about the criminal justice process and state laws.  The website also provides a comprehensive list of referrals to local victim assistance programs statewide, and other resources for victims of crime in Oregon.
  • Oregon’s rape shield law challenged before state Supreme Court

    Oregon’s rape shield law challenged before state Supreme Court
  • Our 2019 Voice for Justice Honoree

    Announcing the honoree for the 2019 Voice for Justice Award presented by NCVLI at the 5th Annual Voices for Justice Reception.
  • Our NCVLI Community

  • Outstanding Volunteer - Amanda Tufts

    Amanda Tufts is a first year law student intern who served as one of NCVLI’s 2010-2011 Violence Against Women Project Law Student Interns. 
  • OVC Announces Victim Assistance Fellowship Solicitation

    A Victim Assistance Fellowship at the Office for Victims of Crime presents a unique opportunity for individuals to gain valuable experience working on victim assistance issues at the federal level while supporting OVC in accomplishing its mission. Learn more here.
  • Pann v. Warren, No. 5:08-CV-13806, 2010 WL 2836879 (E.D. Mich. July 19, 2010) (slip copy)

    In a habeas corpus proceeding, the victims of petitioner’s crime filed a motion to intervene pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 24 and to be heard under the Crime Victim’s Rights Act (CVRA), 18 U.S.C. § 3771 In their motion, the victims argued that they were entitled to intervene in the habeas action because, as family members of the murder victim, they had a property interest in the restitution order resulting from petitioner’s state convictions.
  • Parents of Murdered Children

    503-656-8039
    Parents of Murdered Children and Other Survivors of Homicide Victims is a self-help 
    support organization made up of persons whose loved ones have been murdered.
  • Parents of Murdered Children (POMC)

    (888) 818-POMC
    (513) 721-5683
    Parents of Murdered Children (POMC®) provides ongoing emotional support to help parents and other survivors of homicide facilitate the reconstruction of a “new life” and to promote a healthy resolution. Not only does POMC® help survivors deal with their grief, but also helps with advocacy in the criminal justice system. There are POMC® Chapters across the country which hold monthly meetings and provide support, advocacy, and court accompaniment. POMC®’s website provides numerous educational and support materials, and contains links to a topic forum that allows survivors to communicate with other survivors.
  • Paroline v. United States, No. 12-8561 (2014)

    Petitioner was convicted after a guilty plea to one count of possessing between 150 and 300 images of child pornography, including two images depicting the child sexual abuse of the victim known as “Amy.” Petitioner appealed the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which reversed the district court’s denial of the victim’s request for close to $3.4 million in restitution under 18 U.S.C. § 2259—the mandatory restitution statute that applies to offenses involving sexual exploitation of children—and held that each defendant who possessed the victim’s images should be made liable for the victim’s entire losses, even though other offenders played a role in causing those losses. The United States Supreme Court—accepting review to resolve a conflict in the courts of appeals concerning the proper causation standard to apply in cases subject to restitution under Section 2259—held that the Fifth Circuit erred in failing to construe Section 2259 as including a general proximate-cause requirement for all types of losses. In reaching this holding, the Court concluded that Section 2259’s “proximate result” language in the final “catchall category” of recoverable losses must be read to apply to all categories of losses enumerated in the statute. The Court explained that interpreting Section 2259 to include a proximate cause limitation comports with “common sense” as it “forecloses liability in situations where the causal link between conduct and result is so attenuated that the so-called consequence is more akin to mere fortuity.” The Court found that “the victim’s costs of treatment and lost income resulting from the trauma of knowing that images of her abuse are being viewed over and over are direct and foreseeable results of child- pornography crimes, including possession … .” The Court also held that the district court erred in applying the traditional “but-for” causation test to establish factual causation under Section 2259.
  • Partner Profile: Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance

  • Partnering for Victims’ Rights

    It takes all of us to protect and advance victims’ rights. 
  • Partnering To Ensure Full Restitution

    The Arizona Voice for Crime Victims and NCVLI’a legal team partner on Arizona restitution case.
  • Partnering to Protect Rights in the Courts

    NCVLI filed an amicus curiae brief on August 5th in the Arizona Court of Appeals fighting to protect victims’ rights! Click here  to learn more.
  • Partnering to Respond to Child Abuse

    This month NCVLI, together with the National Center for the Victims of Crime (NCVC) and the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP), filed an amici curiae brief in support of a victim in a case before the Connecticut Supreme Court.  Click here to learn more.
  • Payton v. State, 266 So. 3d 630 (Miss. 2019)

  • Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape

    Toll Free Hotline: (888) 772-7227
    (717) 728-9740
    (800) 692-7445
    The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape works to eliminate all forms of sexual violence and to advocate for the rights and needs of victims of sexual assault.  Their website has referrals to local service and support providers for victims of sexual violence throughout the state.
  • Pennsylvania Office of Victim Advocate

    Office of Victim Advocate (OVA) handles all post-sentencing rights for crime victims. This includes all offenders in Pennsylvania who are serving a state sentence or on state parole or probation, the victims’ rights including input options on parole, inmate release or movement, restitution questions anything that may happen after the offender is sentenced at the local level comes from the OVA.

     

    Pennsylvania has many crime victim organizations at the local level that can assist victims.  To learn more about local county level organizations, click here. 

  • People Against Violent Crime

    (512) 837-PAVC
    People Against Violent Crime is a non-profit organization that provides support and services to victims including notification of offender custody status, general information about crime victims’ rights and the criminal justice system, court accompaniment, and crisis intervention.
  • People v. Gabriesheski, — P.3d —, No. 08SC945, 2011 WL 5037195 (Colo. Oct. 24, 2011) (en banc).

    Defendant was charged with two counts of sexual assault on a child by one in a position of trust, arising out of allegations made against him by his sixteen-year-old stepdaughter.  Before trial, the child-victim recanted and the prosecution provided notice of its intent to call as witnesses the child-victim’s guardian ad litem and the social worker assigned to the case.
  • People v. McCray, — N.E.3d —, 2014 WL 1697020 (N.Y. May 1, 2014)

    Defendant appealed his conviction of first-degree rape, arguing that the trial court erred in failing to grant him access to all of the victim’s mental health records. Defendant and the victim differed in their accounts of the encounter at issue, with defendant claiming it was consensual and the victim claiming it was rape. Before trial defendant sought the victim’s mental health records. The court ordered that the records be reviewed in camera and eventually provided defendant with 28 pages out of the thousands of documents in the records. During trial, evidence revealed that the victim had been diagnosed with a number of psychiatric and other medical conditions, including bipolar disorder, Tourette’s syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, and hypersexuality. The evidence also revealed that she had reported that she could sense the presence of dead people, was undergoing mental health treatment at the time of the incident, and took medications. Following his conviction, defendant appealed, arguing that the trial court violated his rights of confrontation and cross-examination by limiting disclosure of the records. On appeal, the court recharacterized the issue as one better analyzed under Brady. The court reviewed the undisclosed documents, which contained references to the victim having hallucinations and to the victim’s tendency to misremember or misunderstand events.
  • People v. Stanley, — P.3d —, No. S185961, 2012 WL 2686050 (Cal. July 9, 2012) (slip opinion).

    Defendant pled no contest to felony vandalism of the victim’s pickup truck, and the trial court ordered $2,812.94 in restitution—the amount an automotive body shop estimated it would cost to repair the extensive damage caused by defendant’s criminal conduct.  Defendant appealed, arguing that the trial court should have capped restitution at $950, the price the victim originally paid for the used truck.
  • Peugh v. United States, 133 S. Ct. 2072 (2013).

    Defendant, convicted of bank fraud after a jury trial, appealed his sentence of 70 months’ imprisonment.  Defendant argued that the district court violated the Ex Post Facto Clause when it sentenced him to a term within the guideline range under the Sentencing Guidelines in effect at the time of sentencing rather than the more lenient version in effect at the time the crimes were committed.
  • Plaintiff B v. Francis, — F.3d —, No. 10-10664, 2011 WL 294272 (11th Cir. Feb. 1, 2011).

    Four victim-plaintiffs sued Joseph Francis and companies owned or controlled by him for damages arising from defendants’ depiction of the plaintiffs, while minors, in sexually explicit situations in the “Girls Gone Wild” films.  Plaintiffs filed a motion to appear anonymously at trial.
  • Position Paper: Victims’ Rights & Pretrial Release Hearings

    Pretrial release hearings are a critical time for many survivors.  Click here to read our latest Victims’ Rights Position Paper on providing meaningful notice to victims of release hearings.
  • Post-Trial

    Post-Trial

  • Preparing the Next Wave of Victims’ Rights Attorneys

    Crime Victim Litigation Clinic Students receive education and practice skills to represent crime victims.
  • Press Release - Victory for Victims of Child Rape Imagery

    Today, the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) was part of an important victory for victims of child rape imagery (a.k.a. child pornography) who seek to prevent copies of their images being disseminated during court cases. Click here to read the press release.
  • Press Release: Sexual Assault Victims File Important, Precedent-Setting Petition in Utah Supreme Court Seeking Appointment of a Prosecutor to Pursue Their Cases

  • Preventing Re-Victimization

    All too often victims of crime report that enduring the criminal justice system is itself a type of victimization - a secondary or re-victimization.  Factors that impact how victims experience the system include how they are treated during the process, and the amount of control and participatory access that they have. NCVLI fights daily to protect victims’ rights, in large part, to prevent re-victimization.  Most recently, we had to fight in Washington State.  Click here to read more.
  • Prison sentences, parks measures pass, casino and marijuana bids fail

    Oregon voters pass Measure 73, which calls for stiffer penalties for sex offenders.
  • Pro Bono Attorney Spotlight: Joshua Safran

    Joshua Safran, author, attorney, advocate and survivor, will present at NCVLI’s 2014 Crime Victim Law Conference.

  • Pro Bono Attorney Spotlight: Randall Udelman

    Pro Bono Attorney Spotlight: Randall Udelman
  • Pro Bono Partnership to Protect Privacy

    Click here to read about our latest partnership efforts to protect victim privacy.
  • Pro Bono Spotlight: Crew Janci LLP

    Although based in Portland, Oregon, the law firm of Crew Janci LLP provides tenacious advocacy and expert advice for crime victims in civil cases in Oregon and around the country.  They are currently representing 25 victims of sexual abuse in Minnesota in cases against the Boy Scouts and 15 survivors of sexual abuse at the elite Pingry School in New Jersey. Click here to read more.
  • Pro Bono Spotlight: Keith Franz

    NAVRA member Keith Franz has long been a victims’ advocate and recently served as Counsel of Record on two cases for which NCVLI filed Amicus Curiae briefs before the United States Supreme Court.
  • Pro Bono Spotlight: Sarah Einowski

    Pro Bono Spotlight: Sarah Einowski
  • Proceeding by Pseudonym in Sexual Assault Cases

    The Eleventh Circuit court of appeals ruled that a Florida District Court abused its discretion when it denied the requests of four women to proceed anonymously in a civil suit against Joe Francis, the producer of the “Girls Gone Wild” DVD series.  NCVLI participated in the proceedings as amicus curiae.
  • Proposed Pa. bills would help victims of child sex abuse seek justice

    Proposed Pennsylvania legislation would abolish the criminal and civil statutes of limitations on all future instances of child sexual abuse.
  • Protecting A Rape Victim’s Right to Privacy

  • Protecting Child Victims Past Age 18

    NCVLI has filed an amicus curiae brief in a child sexual assault case to protect the right of a mother of the victim to refuse a pre-trail interview upon the child-victim turning 18-years-old.
  • Protecting Privacy

    Victims of crime should not have to sacrifice their privacy in order to seek justice. Click here to learn about the right to privacy.
  • Protecting Rape Victims’ Rights to Privacy and Access to Justice

    This week NCVLI will file an amicus curiae brief in a sexual assault case before the Oregon Supreme Court involving Oregon’s rape shield statute. 
  • Protecting the Rights of Trafficking Victims

    Click to learn a little more about the TA requests that NCVLI sees monthly.
  • Protecting the Rights of Victims of Sexual Assault

    Today, we filed amicus brief in the State of Texas v Ukuwachu. Click here to read about the case.
  • Protecting Victim Privacy

    Last month NCVLI joined the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, and the Sexual Assault Center as amici curiae in a case before the Tennessee Supreme Court. Click here to read more.
  • Protecting Victim Privacy by Redacting Identifying Information

    Disclosure of private information about victims is yet another revictimization in the aftermath of crime.  Many state constitutions and statutes, in addition to federal protections, guarantee victims privacy rights as well as the right to be treated with fairness, dignity, and respect for their privacy.  NCVLI recently provided technical assistance to a state office of crime victim services in support of the office’s decision to redact identifying victim information from documents that were produced in response to a civil discovery request. 
  • Protecting Victims from Invasive Discovery Requests

    NCVLI was recently asked to provide technical assistance to a victim’s attorney who sought to prevent a defendant—who is charged with the attempted murder of the victim—from deposing the victim as part of civil restraining order proceedings.  NCVLI provided support to the victim’s attorney as she sought to ensure that victims’ rights are protected, and defendants are prevented from using civil protective order proceedings to make an end run around these rights and the limitations on discovery in criminal proceedings. 
  • Protecting Victims’ From Trauma

    NCVLI has been partnering with the amazing legal team at Network for Victim Recovery of DC as they fight for the rights of a victim of stalking and domestic violence. Click here to read more.
  • Protection From Intimate Terrorism

    We recently filed an amicus brief in Oregon in support of a victim of domestic violence. Click here to read more.
  • Publication of NCVLI’s 2009-2010 Annual Report

    NCVLI’s Annual Report, published each fall, is an opportunity to learn more about our work to help individual crime victims move toward becoming survivors, and to establish legal precedent so that tomorrow’s victims benefit from today’s efforts.  We thank our amazing community of survivors, attorneys, advocates, volunteers, and donors who stand behind our vision of a balanced and fair justice system.  View this year’s Annual Report here.
  • Raise Your Voice for Justice

    When each of us raises our voice for justice we make a difference. Click here to join us.
  • Rape: Puzzling out declining convictions

    Garvin, a Lewis & Clark Law School professor, has spearheaded the institution of victims’ rights attorneys in the military. Military sex abuse has received a great deal of attention in recent years, but those cases come with an added burden for victims, according to Garvin. A soldier raped by a superior officer faces a potential career dead-end if she prosecutes.

    The use of victims’ rights attorneys places the military a step ahead of the public sector, according to Garvin. In a public sector courtroom, two attorneys are present — the prosecutor trying to get a conviction and the defense lawyer representing the alleged rapist. Neither, Garvin says, has the best interests of the victim at heart.

  • Read NCVLI’s Latest Newsletter of Crime Victim Law

    NCVLI’s bi-annual newsletter, Newsletter of Crime Victim Law, contains legal articles highlighting cutting-edge victims’ rights issues.  The latest edition features articles covering numerous victims’ rights topics including a discussion of the right to be heard through victim impact statements at sentencing and an article on emerging challenges in anti-stalking legislation.
  • Read the Latest Issue of the Victims’ Rights Community Bulletin

    Read the July issue of NCVLI’s bi-monthly Victims’ Rights Community Bulletin!  This month’s issue spotlights the community members who attended and the events that took place as part of NCVLI’s 10th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference.  If you haven’t signed up for our mailing list yet, click here.  We hope you enjoy the latest issue!
  • Read the Latest Newsletter of Crime Victim Law

    We are excited to present the 15th Edition of NCVLI’s Newsletter of Crime Victim Law.  In this Newsletter we focus on victims’ right to access to justice. Only when victims are active participants in the administration of justice will our system truly be a “justice system.”  In the Newsletter we identify changes happening nationwide which ensure victim participation, and we spotlight work we still need to do to secure lasting change. Among the victims’ rights issues we look at:  securing interpreters for victims, allowing the use of facility dogs, and expanding the special victim counsel program that the Air Force launched earlier this year. 
  • Recovering from financial fraud and identity theft – services for victims

    If you are a victim of fraud or identity theft, there are various services that may be helpful in assisting with recovery from the crime
  • Registration Now Open For Next NAVRA Webinar: Best Practices for Serving Identity Theft Victims

    In February NCVLI will continue our 3-part webinar series on online fraud and identity theft exclusively for NAVRA members.  The third part of the series will be offered on Thursday, February 24th, and will address best practices for serving victims of identity theft.  Learn more about the webinar by clicking here
  • Renee Huizinga

    Intern Spotlight. Renee Huizinga is NCVLI’s 2012-2013 social work intern and is currently a dual Masters of Social Work and Masters of Public Health student at Portland State University.
  • Responding to a Changing World

    Privacy is critical to many victims. Since NCVLI’s founding, we have received calls on a near weekly basis seeking help protecting privacy. In recent years, these requests have morphed to include protecting privacy in the face of technology - including cell phones. Click here  to read more.
  • Restitution: A Fundamental Right for Victims

    Victims of crime often suffer immeasurable harm as a result of the criminal conduct inflicted on them.  The economic impact of such harm is rightly borne by the perpetrator, not the victim.   Restitution is one mechanism by which the justice system can ensure that the perpetrator, not the victim, bears the burden.  Restitution is ordered in criminal sentences and is money paid from the offender to the victim for losses that the victim suffered as a result of the offender’s crime.  As part of this fight we are working on four restitution cases pending in appellate courts right now!
  • Rhode Island Attorney General Victim Services

    (401) 274-4400
    The Rhode Island Attorney General’s Office provides advocates to victims of crime.  They are available to answer questions about victims’ rights, the criminal justice system, and provide referrals to victim assistance and services statewide.
  • Rhode Island Crime Victim Compensation Fund

    (401) 462-7655
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF)

    USA
    DREDF is a national law and policy center dedicated to protecting and advancing the civil rights of people with disabilities.
  • Rocky Mountain Victim Law Center & Denver District Attorney’s Office Jointly Honored with 2012 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award

    The Rocky Mountain Victim Law Center & Denver District Attorney’s Office received the 2012 Victims’ Rights Partnership Award for their collaborative efforts in advancing victims’ rights.
  • S. v. R., No. 14-FM-1006 (D.C. Mar. 26, 2015)

    NCVLI participated in this proceeding as amicus curiae, along with co-amici Domestic Violence Legal Empowerment and Appeals Project and Network for Victim Recovery of DC, arguing that civil protective orders such as the one issued in this case provide critical relief to sexual assault survivors and that vacate orders are not “extraordinary” in nature and are consistent with the remedial purposes of the civil protective order statutes.  Attorneys Leah Braimon, Aima Karass, Alyssa Scruggs, and Lauren Snyder of the law firm Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, provided pro bono services assisting with the preparation of the amicus brief.  Attorneys with the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP represented the victim.

     

    S. v. R., No. 14-FM-1006 (D.C. Mar. 26, 2015).  Defendant was the building manager of and also lived in the apartment complex in which the victim lived.  Defendant drugged and raped the victim in his apartment.  The victim filed a petition for a civil protection order (CPO) alleging defendant had sexually assaulted her and requesting that the court order that he vacate his apartment.  The petition was granted.  Defendant asked the court to remove the requirement that he vacate the apartment.  The court denied defendant’s motion and defendant appealed, arguing that the court lacked statutory authority under the Intrafamily Offenses Act (IOA) to issue the order requiring him to vacate the apartment.  The court began by describing that under the IOA, there are four listed situations in which a court may order defendant to vacate the building, none of which were applicable; however, the IOA also contains a catch-all provision, which states that a court may “[d]irect[] the respondent to perform or refrain from other actions as may be appropriate to the effective resolution of the matter.” 

  • Safeguarding Child-Victims’ Rights Initiative Launches Training

    As part of NCVLI’s commitment to furthering the rights of child-victims of crime, the Safeguarding Child-Victims’ Rights Initiative has spent the past year working with an eleven-member multidisciplinary curriculum committee to develop an intensive two-day, skills-based training on how to provide effective rights enforcement representation to child-victims of crime.
  • Save the Date for NCVLI’s 2013 Open House!

    Join the National Crime Victim Law Institute and the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center for an Open House on January 24th to learn more about our organizations, what we have planned for 2013, and how you can get involved to help victims of crime.
    Click here to learn more!
  • Save the Date! 2019 Voices for Justice Reception

    The 2019 Voices for Justice Reception is Thursday, February 21, 2019, in Portland, Oregon.
  • Save Your Seat for the 2019 Voices for Justice Reception!

  • Scholarships Available for 2016 Conference

    If you are interested in attending the 2016 Crime Victim Law Conference, there are numerous opportunities available to offset registration costs. Click here to learn more.
  • Schultz v. United States, No. 08-17304, 2010 WL 431772 (9th Cir. Feb. 9, 2010)

    A fraud victim, who had been awarded over $700,000 in restitution under the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act (MVRA), moved to intervene, pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 24, in a civil action involving the collection and distribution of defendant’s assets. The trial court denied the victim-creditor’s motion, and he appealed. In reviewing his appeal, the court found that the MVRA “clearly gives victims the right to self-help in collecting restitution ordered for their benefit,”
  • Screening of The Hunting Ground Film

    Join NCVLI for a special screening of The Hunting Ground, followed by a Q&A session with a panel of experts and nurse, activist, & survivor Brenda Tracy.
  • Securing Full Restitution to Minimize the Financial Impact of Crime

    Victims incur a myriad of expenses in the aftermath of crime. Click here to read about a recent case where we advocated to ensure a victim does not carry the financial burden of their own victimization.
  • Securing Restitution for Oregon Victims

    NCVLI will be moving to participate as amicus curiae in an upcoming case involving the interpretation of Oregon’s restitution statute. The defendant, who was convicted of manslaughter in the second degree, is appealing the restituion ordered to the victim’s family, arguing that these expenses were not “necessarily” incurred, as required under Oregon statute.
  • Seeking Justice for Women Who Say They’ve Been Attacked by Athletes

  • Service Women’s Action Network

    SWAN’s mission is to transform military culture by securing equal opportunity and freedom to serve without discrimination, harassment or assault; and to reform veterans’ services to ensure high quality health care and benefits for women veterans and their families.
  • Sex assault victim who is suing City of Holland cannot remain anonymous in court, judge says

    A federal Michigan court rules that a victim of sexual assault cannot remain anonymous in a civil suit filed against the state.  Although anonymity often is allowed in cases alleging ongoing governmental misconduct when the violator is in a position of power, the court ruled anonymity was not required here because the case involves a past incident and the governmental actor is no longer employed by the state. 
  • Sexual assault in the military: Can special counsels for victims help?

    After a wave of sexual assault cases in the military, the Air Force is using special lawyers in a venture that top Pentagon officials hope will transform the way the armed forces treat victims.
  • SF ordinance calls for faster DNA testing

    A San Francisco ordinance calls for DNA from sexual assault cases to be tested within two weeks of collection.
  • Share Your Input With NCVLI

  • Significant Legal Victory for Sexual Assault Survivors!

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month has already seen a significant legal victory. NCVLI joined two amazing co-amici in support of enforcing a civil protective order. Click here to read more.
  • Six-Part Series on Marsy’s Law in California

    Six-part series on Marsy’s Law in California.
  • Social Media Internship

    We are currently accepting applications for our Social Media Internship Position!
  • South Carolina Attorney General Victim Assistance

    Toll free: (800) 213-5652
    The South Carolina Attorney General’s Office provides victim assistance, including information regarding the rights of crime victims and referrals to statewide resources and victim service providers.
  • South Carolina Immigrant Victim Network (SCIVN)

    English: (803) 750-1200 x188
    Español Toll Free/Llamada Gratis: (888) 852-1900
    SCVIN collaborates with immigrant communities, victim service providers, healthcare and legal professionals, and law enforcement agencies in order to provide culturally and linguistically competent resources for immigrant victims of crime.
  • South Carolina Victim Compensation Fund

    (803) 734-1900
    Victim only: (800) 220-5370
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of earnings, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • South Dakota Coalition Ending Domestic & Sexual Violence

    (605) 391-6402
    The South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault is a statewide organization of sexual violence programs with a special focus on native women.  Their website has referrals to victim crisis lines in South Dakota and local shelter services.
  • South Dakota Passes Marsy’s Law

    NCVLI has issued a press release on the South Dakota Attorney General’s interpretation of a key right in South Dakota’s victims’ rights constitutional amendment approved by voters. Click here to read the press release.
  • Southern Poverty Law Center

    (334) 956-8200 or Toll-Free at (888) 414-7752

    The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) is dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society.  The SPLC works to stop workplace exploitation and other human rights abuses.  

  • Sponsor Spotlight

  • Sponsor Spotlight: Perkins & Company

    Perkins & Company, Portland’s largest locally-based accounting firm, is a sponsor of NCVLI’s Voices for Justice Reception.
  • Spotlight: U.S. Attorney Amanda Marshall

    Amanda Marshall, United States Attorney for the District of Oregon, is a plenary speaker at NCVLI’s 2014 Crime Victim Law Conference.
  • Spring Clinic Class Makes a Difference for Victims

    Writing a technical assistance memo for a US Attorney’s Office, helping on an amicus curiae brief for the Alaska Supreme Court, presenting with a former federal judge at the Crime Victim Law Conference - Brendan O’Hanlon, Shara Jones, Alvin Morgan, David Susens, and Leslie Baze provided vital technical assistance in real cases this spring while practicing legal research and writing skills in the Crime Victim Litigation Clinic. 
  • Staff Profile: Josh Medina

    Staff Profile: Josh Medina
  • Staff Spotlight: Annie Smith

    Staff Spotlight: Annie Smith
  • Stalking Victim Presses for Employment Protection

    While there is support behind the congressional anti-stalking bill, which would (among other things) extend the definition of stalking to cyber-stalking, some say it does not go far enough because it does not include employment protection for victims of stalking.
  • State Asks Montana Supreme Court To Uphold Marsy’s Law

    State Asks Montana Supreme Court To Uphold Marsy’s Law
  • State ex rel. Gardner v. Wright, --- S.W.3d ---, No. ED 106935, 2018 WL 3978352 (Mo. Ct. App. Aug. 21, 2018)

  • State ex rel. Smith v. Reeves, — P.3d —, No. 1 CA-SA 11-0007, 2011 WL 700524 (Ariz. Ct. App. Mar. 1, 2011).

    Defendant was charged with one count of leaving the scene of a fatal injury accident.  Shortly before trial, defendant filed a motion to preclude the state from referring to the child who was killed in the accident as a “victim.”  While the state did not oppose this request, the prosecutor raised concerns relating to the protection of the child’s parents’ rights as victims of the offense.
  • State v. Algeo, — P.3d —, Nos. CC CR100607, SC S060830, 2013 WL 5497268 (Or. Oct. 3, 2013).

    NCVLI participated in this case as amicus curiae in support of the crime victim’s petition for review before the Oregon Supreme Court.  NCVLI argued that the trial court violated the crime victims’ state constitutional and statutory guarantees of justice, fair treatment, and prompt restitution in the full amount of their economic damages when it incorporated civil comparative fault principles into criminal restitution.
  • State v. Campbell, --- P.3d ---, No. A162357, 2019 WL 457574 (Or. Ct. App. Feb. 6, 2019)

  • State v. Dye, — P.3d —, No. 66549-9-I, 2012 WL 3641607 (Wash. Ct. App. Aug. 27, 2012).

    Defendant was convicted of residential burglary and appealed, arguing, inter alia, that his right to a fair trial was violated when the court allowed Ellie, the prosecutor’s office’s facility dog, to sit next to the developmentally disabled adult victim during the victim’s testimony.
  • State v. Gault, — A.3d —, No. 18112, 2012 WL 1087832 (Conn. April 10, 2012).

    In a case of first impression, the Connecticut Supreme Court analyzed whether a victim could seek enforcement of the state’s constitutional victims’ rights by appealing an order issued in a criminal case.
  • State v. Jent, — P.3d —, No. DA 12–0399, 2013 WL 1427280 (Mont. Apr. 9, 2013).

    Defendant pleaded guilty to the aggravated assault of his wife, which resulted in a fracture of the victim’s orbital wall of her right eye socket.  As part of his sentence, the trial court ordered defendant to pay over $44,000 in restitution, including over $19,000 in restitution for medical expenses arising from the victim’s post-assault suicide attempt.
  • State v. Johnson, — N.W.2d —, No. 2011AP2864–CRAC, 2013 WL 3335048 (Wis. July 3, 2013) (per curiam).

    Defendant was charged with one count of repeated sexual assault of a child—his stepdaughter.  The trial court granted defendant’s motion for in camera inspection of the child-victim’s privileged therapy records, and the victim refused to consent to the release of the records.
  • State v. Lane, Nos. 20070878, 20061126, 2009 WL 1635363 (Utah June 12, 2009)

    Defendant killed two brothers, Dan and John Hays, when the car he was driving collided head on into their vehicle. The state charged defendant with two counts of misdemeanor negligent homicide, among others. Peggy and Patricia Hays, the brothers’ wives, and victims under Utah’s Constitution and the Rights of Crime Victims Act, informed the prosecutor they wished to exercise their rights to be present, to address the court at the plea and sentencing hearing, and to request restitution.
  • State v. Lucas, — P.3d —, No. 1 CA-CR 13-0215, 2014 WL 1094683 (Ariz. Ct. App. Mar. 20, 2014).

    Defendant was convicted of two counts of sexual conduct with a minor, two counts of transferring dangerous drugs, and two counts of involving a minor in drug offenses.  Before trial, defendant obtained at least seven trial continuances, during which time the victim turned 18-years-old.  After the victim turned 18-years-old, defendant moved to depose the victim’s grandmother—the person with whom the victim lived and who had been exercising the victim’s rights on his behalf.
  • State v. Mankin, — P.3d —, No. 38977-1-II, 2010 WL 4069487 (Wash. Ct. App. Oct. 19, 2010).

    Defendant was charged with the unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine and sought pretrial interviews with three police officers involved in the case.  The officers were willing to talk to defense counsel, but when they refused to allow him to tape record them, he terminated the interviews.  Defendant then sought a court order requiring the witnesses to submit to a recorded deposition pursuant to a state court rule.  The trial court granted defendant’s request, holding that witnesses were subject to deposition after they refused to consent to the tape recording of a voluntary pretrial interview in a criminal case.  The state appealed, arguing, inter alia, that the state court rule permitting depositions to be ordered does not apply when a witness has agreed to the interview but has merely placed a condition on the interview (for example, that it not be tape recorded).
  • State v. N.R.L., — P.3d —, Nos. CC J090305, CA A144789, SC S060355, 2013 WL 5497227 (Or. Oct. 3, 2013) (en banc).

    NCVLI participated in this case as amicus curiae in support of the government’s opposition to the juvenile offender’s appeal before the Oregon Supreme Court.  NCVLI argued that restitution is sui generis in nature as it serves both civil and criminal law purposes, and that recent amendments of Oregon’s criminal and juvenile restitution laws have not fundamentally transformed restitution from a criminal sanction to a civil remedy that is subject to the state constitutional right to a jury trial for civil cases.
  • State v. Pumphrey, — P.3d —, No. A153140, 2014 WL 5736682 (Or. Ct. App. Nov. 5, 2014).

    Defendant pleaded guilty to two counts of violating a stalking protective order (SPO) and the trial court imposed restitution totaling $2,674.76 for expenses incurred by the victim as a result of the crime.  The victim’s expenses included the costs of:  changing her phone number; changing the locks on her home; staying at a safe house during court proceedings; obtaining copies of police reports in another state; and taking one day off from work to facilitate the changing of her locks.

  • State v. Ryan, — P.3d —, No. SC S059065, 2011 WL 3963492 (Or. Sept. 9, 2011).

    Defendant was convicted of two counts of violating a stalking protective order.  The trial court denied defendant’s motion for judgment of acquittal on the two counts.  On review, the Oregon Court of Appeals reversed defendant’s convictions, reasoning that the state’s constitutional free speech provision required that the statute be narrowed to withstand an overbreadth challenge to require “an unequivocal threat of the sort that makes it objectively reasonable for the victim to believe that he or she is being threatened with imminent and serious physical harm,” and that the state had failed to meet its burden of proof on both counts.
  • State v. Shepherd, — A.3d —, No. 2010-336, 2012 WL 5275420 (Vt. Oct. 26, 2012).

    Defendant pled guilty to aggravated assault, lewd and lascivious conduct with a child, and sexual exploitation of a child, arising out of his sexual assault of a 10-year-old child-victim.  Defendant appealed the trial court’s order that he pay restitution for the costs of relocating the child-victim’s family to Hawaii that were not covered by state victims’ compensation program funds.
  • State v. Tena, 412 P.3d 175 (Or. 2018)

    Defendant was convicted of felony fourth-degree assault constituting domestic violence.  Defendant appealed his conviction, arguing that the trial court impermissibly admitted character evidence at trial by allowing the state to introduce evidence that he had previously assaulted two other intimate partners.  The state argued that the prior incidents were admissible to prove intent to counter the defendant’s theory of the case that the victim had fallen and accidentally injured herself.  The state asserted that the evidence was admissible under Oregon Evidence Code (OEC) 404(3), which prohibits the use of evidence to prove the character of a person in order to show that the person acted in conformity therewith, but allows the evidence if it is to prove “motive, opportunity, intent, preparation, plan, knowledge, identity, or absence of mistake or accident.”  The state argued that the prior assaults were admissible under both theories:  either to prove defendant had a hostile motive toward the victim or to establish defendant’s intent under the doctrine-of-chances theory, which propositions that multiple instances of similar conduct are unlikely to happen by accident.  Alternatively, the state argued that if the evidence was not admissible under OEC 404(3) for nonpropensity purposes, it was admissible under OEC 404(4), which provides that “evidence of other crimes, wrongs or acts by the defendant is admissible if relevant” if otherwise not prohibited by state or federal law.   The trial court agreed with the state and allowed the evidence under OEC 404(3).  The court of appeals affirmed the conviction on the basis that the evidence of the prior assaults provided proof of hostile motive.  The Oregon Supreme Court disagreed.  The court found that the state’s argument assumed that because defendant assaulted two of his prior intimate partners, those assaults were motivated by the fact that they were his intimate partners. The court rejected this assumption in that “one does not necessarily follow from the other[.]” 
  • States Resist Federal Sex-Offender Registry

    The federal law the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act, designed to track sex offenders more effectively, is hitting resistance from some states.     
  • Stay Current on Victims’ Rights Cases

    Did you know that NCVLI follows victims’ rights cases throughout the country? Our legal team regularly summarizes court opinions that impact victims’ rights and issues New & Noteworthy alerts. Click here to learn more
  • Stegman v. United States, No. 14-2445-JWL, 2015 WL 728487 (D. Kan. Feb. 19, 2015).

    An identity theft victim was notified by the United States government that her identity had been stolen and used to file federal income tax returns for tax years 2012 and 2013.  The investigation of the crime was on-going and no formal charges had yet been brought.  The victim, through written request, asked the government to provide her with information on the crime itself and the status of the investigation.  After the government refused to provide her with the information, the victim filed suit in district court under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA), 18 U.S.C. § 3771, seeking a court order compelling the United States government to turn over the information.  The victim claimed that the government had violated three of her CVRA rights:  to be reasonably protected from the accused; to proceedings free from unreasonable delay; and to be treated with fairness and respect for the victim’s dignity and privacy.  The court rejected each of these claims in turn.
  • Steven Kelly Receives 2011 Legal Advocacy Award

    NCVLI is proud to honor Attorney Steven Kelly with the 2011 Legal Advocacy Award for his tireless legal advocacy to enforce victims’ rights.
  • Strengthening Victim Participation

    In January 2017, Meg Garvin traveled to Uganda to participate in a round table to discuss victim participation in cases involving international crime. Click here to read more.
  • Stronghearts Native Helpline

    1-844-7NATIVE (1-844-762-8483)

    Through StrongHearts, Native callers can connect one-on-one with knowledgeable StrongHearts advocates who can provide immediate support, personalized safety planning, crisis intervention, and referrals to Native-centered resources. Advocates are available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. CST.  

  • Student Profile - Kaylee Dickerboom

    Student Profile: Kaylee Dickerboom
  • Student Scholarship Available for 2014 Conference

    Thanks to funding made available from a generous donor, NCVLI is pleased to offer a full tuition scholarship to an eligible law student to attend the 2014 Crime Victim Law ConferenceClick here to download the application and apply!
  • Summer Internship Position Announced!

    NCVLI is seeking candidates for 2-3 full time Victims’ Rights Legal Intern positions for Summer 2015.
  • Support Victims through your Holiday Shopping!

    There are many ways to support crime victims and now that the holiday shopping season is upon us there are a number of easy ways to give while you shop!  Designate NCVLI as your charity of choice on: Goodsearch, Goodshop, Gooddining, AmazonSmile, and when selling on eBay through eBay Giving Works.
  • Survivor Scholarships Available for 2015 Conference

    Thanks to funding from generous donors, NCVLI is pleased to offer full tuition scholarships to eligible survivors to attend the 2015 Crime Victim Law Conference. Click here to download an application and apply. Applications are due April 17, 2015.
  • Take Advantage of Conference Early Bird Rates

    Register by April 7th for the Early Bird Rate!
  • Tax-Related Identity Theft

    OnGuardOnline.gov Urges Taxpayers to Contact the IRS If They Suspect Tax-Related Identity Theft
  • Tennessee Attorney General Victim Services

    (615) 741-8109
    (615) 532-1971
    The Tennessee Attorney General’s Office provides information for victims regarding their rights, the criminal justice system, and notification about their cases.
  • Tennessee Crime Victims’ Compensation Fund

    (615) 741-2734
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.


  • Texas - Sexual Assault Legal Services & Assistance (SALSA)

    (888) 343-4414
    A project of the Texas Legal Services Center and the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault, SALSA provides free legal services and support to sexual assault victims throughout the state.
  • Texas Attorney General Victim Services

    The Texas Attorney General’s Office Crime Victim Services provides victim notification, compensation, and referrals to statewide victim resources and assistance.
  • Texas Council on Family Violence

    512.794.1133

    The Texas Council on Family Violence promotes safe and healthy relationships by supporting service providers, facilitating strategic prevention efforts, and creating opportunities for freedom from domestic violence. The website offers an interactive map by county for service providers.
  • Texas Legal Services Center - AVOICE

    (888) 343-4414
    Advocates for Victims of Crime (AVOICE) is a Texas Legal Services Center statewide project providing free direct legal representation and referrals to victims of violent crime, and providing education about crime victim’s rights. AVOICE lawyers offer legal advice, safety planning, pro se assistance, and legal representation. AVOICE also assists victims with applying for crime victim compensation claims. 
  • Texas Victim Legal Assistance Network

    Texas Victim Legal Assistance Network
  • Thank You for Joining Our End-of-Year Campaign

    Thank you from all of us at NCVLI to everyone who participated in our 2013 Annual Fund. Thanks to your generous support, this has been our most successful end-of-year campaign yet. But there is still time to give. We welcome donations year-round and can even set up annual, monthly, or weekly recurring donations. Click here to give.
  • Thank you to our 2014-15 business sponsors

    Business small and large, local and national, contributed to NCVLI’s success this year. Click here to see the list.
  • Thank you to our 2016-17 business sponsors

    Businesses small and large, local and national, contributed to NCVLI’s success this year. Click here to see the list.
  • Thank you to our 2017-18 business sponsors!

  • Thank you to our Conference Volunteers!

    This year NCVLI was fortunate to have the support of an incredible volunteer force at our Crime Victim Law Conference.  Volunteers donated over 100 hours in making the Conference a success.   Volunteers assisted with activities ranging from photographer to session room monitor to staffing the NAVRA information table to procurement of raffle items for the Crime Victims’ Rights Reception.  Our volunteers had a wide variety of skills and did an amazing job staffing the Conference and inspiring others to give to victims’ rights.  One of the perks of volunteering at the Conference is the opportunity for volunteers to listen in on sessions and network with Conference attendees.  NCVLI summer intern and University of Oregon law student, Sarah Hays, had this to say about her volunteer experience:
    Attending the annual Conference and having the opportunity to meet and learn from experts in victim law was part of why I wanted to work with NCVLI.  Being a novice in the field, attending the Conference showed me just how many facets there are to victim law, and how many ways there are to help. I am grateful for the chance to be a participant and excited for how I might support NCVLI in the future.

    NCVLI is grateful for the support and enthusiasm of this year’s volunteers.  Thank you for playing such a critical role in making the event a success!
  • The Custody Project

    850-682-3460
    The Custody Project assists mothers and their children with visitation and custody expenses. The organization assists with financial crises affecting care, custody and visitation. They are able to help families with expenses such as rent, utilities, legal fees, education costs and heath costs.
  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC)

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is a governmental agency whose mission is to protect consumers. The FTC homepage provides links to a number of fraud-related information pages including privacy & security, internet fraud & safety, spam emails, and web scams. The FTC is also the central reporting mechanism for fraud and ID theft. They do not resolve individual complaints but reporting is used to detect patterns that help lead to investigations and prosecutions.
  • The Hotline

    1−800−799−7233

    TTY 1−800−787−3224

    The National Domestic Violence Hotline supports male victims and recognizes the unique obstacles they encounter when seeking help.  Advocates can provide information, find local resources, safety plan, and provide peer support.

  • The International Victims’ Rights Community is Growing

    Meaningful participation of victims in criminal justice proceedings is receiving increased attention not only in the United States but across the world. Click here to read about recent efforts in Kenya.
  • The National Center on Elder Abuse

    855-500-3537
    The National Center on Elder Abuse is a national resource for elder rights, law enforcement and legal professionals, public policy leaders, researchers, and the public. The Center provides referrals to direct services. The Center’s website contains links to other organizations that advocate for the elderly, and it provides links to toll-free reporting lines to report elder abuse.
  • The Value of Vets

    Recent studies show that military sexual assault and sexual harassment against women have reached “dangerous rates,” with serious ramifications for these women’s health.  However, many cities do not have the resources to care for these veterans.   
  • This Month in Rights: Victims’ Rights are Human Rights

    Victims’ rights are human rights.   
    Human rights are those basic rights and freedoms to which all people are entitled.  Common sense tells us that victims of stalking deserve to be protected; co-victims of homicide are entitled to an opportunity to speak about the impact of the crime; child-victims should have their privacy protected; and all victims deserve to be treated with dignity, fairness, and respect throughout the criminal justice process.    
    Every time we endeavor to protect, enforce, or advance victims’ rights we are ensuring that victims are afforded basic human rights. 
  • Thousands of Rape Kits Sit Untested for Decades, but Change Would Be Costly

    Tens of thousands of Texas rape kits go untested; victims’ rights advocates and some lawmakers say they will work to pass legislation to get the evidence tested.
  • Three Sites Selected to Increase Legal Services To Crime Victims in Rural Communities

    After a competitive national selection process, we are excited to announced the three subaward recipients.
  • TN bill aims to improve domestic violence accounting by police

    A Tennessee bill would develop a better accounting of domestic violence in Tennessee by forcing police officers to create a detailed report for every domestic violence complaint within 48 hours. 
  • Toolkit Additions

    Toolkit Tutorial: Victim Impact Statements
  • Training & Technical Assistance to Build Capacity

    Supporting the Wraparound Victim Legal Assistance Networks.
  • Training the Next Wave of Victims’ Rights Attorneys

    Each term – fall, summer, winter - Lewis & Clark Law students in their second or third year of law school join the NCVLI legal team when they enroll in the Crime Victim Litigation Clinic.  Click here to read about what the current student are doing.
  • Trainings During Domestic Violence Awareness Month

    In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness month, NAVRA, NCVLI’s membership alliance committed to the protection, enforcement, and advancement of crime victims’ rights nationwide, is offering two trainings in October. Click here to learn more.
  • Transgender Law Center

    Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.
  • Trial Toolkit

    Trial Toolkit
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services: Immigration Options for Victims of Crimes

    This brochure from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services provides information about the different types of visas available to immigrant victims of crime.
  • United States v. Castleman, 134 S. Ct. 1405 (2014).

    Defendant pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of intentionally and knowingly causing bodily injury to the mother of his child.  Several years later, federal authorities learned that defendant was selling firearms on the black market, and he was indicted on two counts of illegally possessing a firearm under a federal statute prohibiting the possession of a firearm or ammunition by any individual who has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence, which is defined as requiring “as an element, the use or attempted use of physical force, or the the threatened use of a deadly weapon.”  Defendant moved to dismiss the indictment, arguing that his prior conviction did not qualify as a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence because it did not contain, as an element, the use of physical force.
  • United States v. Dixon, --- F. Supp. 3d ---, No. 1:18-cr-00358 (TNM), 2019 WL 498805 (D.D.C. Feb. 8, 2019)

  • United States v. Galemmo, No 1:13-CR-141, 2014 WL 7340365 (S.D. Ohio Dec. 23, 2014) (slip copy).

    Defendant pleaded guilty to one count of wire fraud and one count of money laundering in connection with a Ponzi scheme that defrauded 141 victims.  The plea agreement required defendant to forfeit certain property to the government, and defendant was also ordered to pay more than 34 million dollars in restitution to the victims.  The government published notice of its intent to dispose of defendant’s forfeited property, and defendant’s father, along with three victims of defendant’s scheme, claimed an interest in the property.  

  • United States v. Green, — Fed. Appx. —, No. 17-2175, 2018 WL 1733239 (3d Cir. Apr. 10, 2018)

    Defendant pleaded guilty to indecent exposure and was sentenced to imprisonment.  At the sentencing hearing, the victim gave a victim impact statement on the record.  Defense counsel sought to cross-examine her and the government objected.  The district court sustained the objection.  Defendant appealed the district court’s ruling prohibiting the cross examination of the victim at his sentencing hearing, arguing that it violated his Confrontation Clause and due process rights.  The court began by noting that under the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA), 18 U.S.C. § 3771, crime victims have the right to be reasonably heard at any public proceeding in the district court involving release, plea, sentencing, or any parole proceeding, and that courts may not limit victims to a written statement.  The court explained that because the victim in this case made her statement in the sentencing context, the law is clear that the Confrontation Clause does not apply.  Accordingly, the court found that he did not have the right to confront the victim at sentencing.  The court further held that defendant’s due process rights were not violated by the ruling.  
  • United States v. Hertz, No. 09-cr-00384-MSK, 2010 WL 447749 (D. Colo. Feb. 4, 2010) (slip copy)

    Defendant, charged with having made telephone threats to a reproductive health services facility, requested, inter alia, that the court make a discretionary transfer of his change of plea hearing “for the convenience of the parties and witnesses and in the interests of justice,” pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 21(b).
  • United States v. Jackson, No. 2:16-cr-00054-DCN, 2018 WL 3127241 (D.S.C. June 26, 2018) (slip copy)

  • United States v. Mitchell, No. 2:08CR125DAK, 2010 WL 890078 (D. Utah Mar. 8, 2010)

    Media outlets sought physical copies of video clips shown at defendant’s public competency hearing. The court considered the media’s request under both the First Amendment and common law standards governing the press and public’s right of access to court documents.
  • United States v. Nosal, No. CR-08-0237 EMC, 2013 WL 1405844 (N.D. Cal. Apr. 8, 2013) (slip copy).

    Defendant, formerly a high-level employee at an international executive recruitment service firm, was indicted on charges of mail fraud, theft of trade secrets, and illegal computer intrusion, resulting from his use of his former-employer’s confidential database to help him start a competing business.  Before trial, the court issued an order granting the state’s motion to exclude from the courtroom most witnesses, including three attorneys for the corporate-victim, defendant’s former employer.
  • United States v. Spensley, No. 09-CV-20082, 2011 WL 165835 (C.D. Ill. Jan. 19, 2011).

    Defendant was indicted on several charges relating to production and possession of child pornography.  Prior to trial, he filed a motion in limine in which he made two arguments.  First, he objected to the designation of the images involved in the case as “child pornography.”  He argued that one issue in the case is whether the images in question meet the federal definition of child pornography, and thus to characterize them as child pornography is argumentative and subverts defendant’s presumption of innocence.
  • United States. v. Mitchell, No. 2:08CR125DAK, 2010 WL 4386915 (D. Utah Oct. 29, 2010) (slip copy).

    In the initial stages of a high profile case in which defendant is accused of the kidnapping and sexual assault of a child, the court, inter alia, devised a plan to accommodate the media’s heightened interest in the voir dire proceedings.
  • Untested Rape Kits in Memphis, TN

    In the continuing issue of untested rape kit backlogs across the nation, WREG News reports on the situation in Memphis, TN. Watch the video here. For more on the problem of rape kit backlogs, check out NCVLI attorney Ali Wilkinson’s story in the 11th Edition of NCVLI News.
  • Upholding Rape Shield Protections

    Click here to read about an amicus brief filed with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals in support of a victim of sexual assault.
  • Utah Crime Victim Reparations

    (800) 621-7444
    (801) 238-2360
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Utah Domestic Violence Coalition

    (801) 521-5544
    The Utah Domestic Violence Coalition website provides referrals to shelter services and support programs for victims of domestic violence and stalking throughout the state.
  • Vermont Attorney General Victim Services

    (802) 241-4688
    (800) 584-3485
    The Vermont Office of the Attorney General provides victim services and information regarding victims’ rights.  Victim services include notification, protection, compensation, counseling, and referral to statewide victim resources and assistance.
  • Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

    Domestic Violence Hotline: (800) 228-7395
    Sexual Violence Hotline: (800) 489-7273
    The Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence is a coalition of advocacy programs for victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking.  Their website has referrals to local support providers, including rape crisis centers and shelter programs, throughout the state.
  • Veterans sue over sexual abuse

    A federal class-action lawsuit is filed against Defense Secretary Robert Gates and his predecessor Donald Rumsfeld, accusing the military of ignoring reports of sexual assault and rape by fellow service members.
  • Victim Privacy: Using Victims’ Rights to Fight Invasions Before they Happen & Respond After-the-Fact

    Join our first webinar of 2014! In this webinar presenters will discuss the legal arguments that support the use of pseudonyms to protect victim privacy as well the arguments for remedying violations if a pseudonym was not used, including redaction & substitution, sealing of court documents, and Internet Take Down Letters.
  • Victim Rights Law Center

    (617) 399-6720
    The Victim Rights Law Center is the first law center in the nation dedicated solely to advocating for the civil legal needs of sexual assault survivors.  The VRLC provides direct legal representation to victims of rape and sexual assault in Massachusetts. The VRLC attorneys provide consultation and legal representation in the areas of privacy, education, immigration, employment, public benefits, housing and safety.  Their website also has links to other resources for crime victims in Massachusetts.
  • Victim Support Services

    (800) 346-7555
    Victim Support Services provides support and resources to victims of crime throughout the state of Washington.  Services include crisis intervention, information and referral, and advocacy.
  • Victim Voice Before the Supreme Court

    In our ongoing effort to ensure victims’ have a voice before the United States Supreme Court and to fight for full restitution for children who have been sexually exploited and filmed (a.k.a. child abuse image victims or victims of child pornography), NCVLI teamed up with the University of Pennsylvania Law School Supreme Court Clinic in late December to file an amicus curiae brief in support of a petition for review before the U.S. Supreme Court. The New York Times Magazine published a moving front page story about this issue, “The Price of a Stolen Childhood,” in their Sunday, January 27th, 2013 edition.
  • VictimConnect

    1-855-4VICTIM (1-855-484-2846)

    Chat.VictimConnect.org
    The VictimConnect Resource Center is a place for crime victims to learn about their rights and options confidentially and compassionately. A program of the National Center for Victims of Crime, it combines a helpline, an online chat, and web-based information and service referrals.
  • Victims of Crime Resource Center (Sacramento, CA)

    1-800-VICTIMS (842-8467)

    The Victims of Crime Resource Center is located on the Pacific McGeorge School of Law campus in Sacramento, California. McGeorge students, under attorney supervision, provide information and referrals statewide to victims, their families, victim service providers, and victim advocates.

    Primarily through the hotline, Center staff provide resource and referral information to victims and their families, victim service providers and other victim advocates. Callers receive information on such matters as victims compensation, victims’ rights in the Justice System, restitution, civil suits, right to speak at sentencing and parole board hearings, as well as information on specific rights of victims of domestic violence, elder abuse, child abuse, and abuse against disabled.

  • Victims’ Rights & Legal Services

    Victims’ Rights & Legal Services
  • Victims’ Rights Law by State

    Click on the state below to view its current victims’ rights laws.
  • Victims’ rights marks a decade of progress: Portland institute guides growing national legal field

    Although it hardly existed 40 years ago, today victims’ rights are defined and protected at the federal level and in all 50 states. Recent court rulings are establishing important precedents. Many of them are the result of briefs prepared and filed by the National Crime Victim Law Institute, the only organization of its type in the country.
  • Victims’ Rights Pre-Charging

    Too often victims of crime are left wondering about the status of the case against their offender, including whether charges are being pursued. Click here to read about a victim’s right to confer.
  • Victims’ Rights Writing Competition

    Mark your calendars for NCVLI’s 13th Annual Crime Victim Law Conference, to be held June 20th-21st, 2014 at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon.  NCVLI’s Conference is the only conference in the country focused on rights enforcement. Join us for this invaluable opportunity to learn the practical skills necessary to serve victims and to participate in key conversations that will shape the future of victims’ rights.  We are now accepting submissions for the Victims’ Rights Writing Competition to be presented at the Conference (due February 17th). For competition forms and to learn more about the Conference, click here.
  • VINE (Victim Information and Notification Everyday)

    This service allows crime victims to obtain timely and reliable information about criminal cases and the custody status of offenders 24 hours a day. Victims and other concerned citizens can also register to be notified by phone, email or TTY device when an offender’s custody status changes.
  • Virginia Criminal Injuries Compensation Fund

    (800) 552-4007
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance

    800-838-8238 
    The Virginia Sexual and Domestic Violence Action Alliance is a statewide organization of agencies and individuals working to end sexual and domestic violence.  Their website has referrals to local support providers for victims of sexual and domestic violence throughout the state, such as rape crisis centers and shelter programs.
  • Voice For Justice Award Honoree: Senator Sara Gelser

    Voice For Justice Award Honoree: Senator Sara Gelser
  • Volunteer Spotlight: Dmitriy Golosinskiy

    Volunteer Spotlight:  Dmitriy Golosinskiy began volunteering at NCVLI in the fall of 2014 and will start his second year at Lewis & Clark law School this fall.
  • Washington Abused Deaf Women’s Advocacy Services (ADWAS)

    ADWAS provides comprehensive services to Deaf and Deaf-Blind victims/survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking in Pierce, King, and Snohomish Counties in Washington State. ADWAS also partners with the National Domestic Violence Hotline to provide deaf advocates to deaf callers by communicating through Instant Messenger and videophone calls, Monday-Friday, 9am -5pm Pacific Standard Time.  TTY Hotline is available through the National Domestic Violence Hotline 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Washington Coalition of Crime Victim Advocates (WCCVA)

    (360) 456-3858
    WCCVA is a coalition of individuals, agencies, and organizations that are working together to improve services for victims of crime and to strengthen victims’ rights.  They provide trainings to professionals and work on public policy issues affecting victims of crime.  WCCVA is also a primary source of referrals to local crime victim services throughout Washington State.  They provide trouble-shooting assistance to victims who encounter challenges with crime victims’ rights or services in their communities.
  • Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs (WCSAP)

    (360) 754-7583
    TTY: (360) 709-0305
    WCSAP is a membership agency composed of individuals and organizations dedicated to ending sexual assault in their communities. Their website has referrals to local service and support providing programs for victims of sexual violence throughout the state.
  • Washington D.C. Crime Victims Compensation Program

    (202) 879-4216
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, travel expenses, relocation costs, crime scene cleanup, and funeral costs.
  • Washington Department of Corrections Victim Services Program

    (800) 322-2201
    The Washington Department of Corrections Victim Services Program provides notification to victims of offender status and other support services including safety planning.
  • Washington Office of Crime Victims Advocacy

    Washington, USA
    Advocating on behalf of victims obtaining needed services and resources; Administering grant funds for community programs working with crime victims; Assisting communities in planning and implementing services for crime victims; and Advising local and state government agencies of practices, policies, and priorities which impact crime victims.
  • Washington State Victim Assistance Academy Week

    NCVLI partnered with the Washington Coalition of Crime Victim Advocates on two trainings last week in Vancouver, Washington!
  • Watch the Congressional Hearing on Rape in the United States

    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Crime and Drugs, has scheduled a hearing entitled “Rape in the United States: The Chronic Failure to Report and Investigate Rape Cases” for Tuesday, September 14, 2010 at 2:15 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Watch the webcast live by clicking here, or attend the hearing in person at Room 226 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C.
  • We Want to Hear From You - How Can We Make NCVLI Resources Better?

    NCVLI is committed to providing professionals, victims, and communities with the resources needed to support victims and protect their rights.  Please take 8-10 minutes to complete a survey to let us know how you use our resources. Click here to read more.
  • West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    The West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence website has a directory of shelter programs and support providers for victims of domestic violence throughout the state.
  • West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information & Services

    The West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information & Services is a statewide organization of member programs that provide crisis services to victims.  Their website has links to victim services and support throughout West Virginia.
  • What are Some Early Steps In the Romanian Criminal Justice Process?

    In Romania an indictment officially starts the criminal case in court.  The indictment is a document summarizing the alleged criminal offenses, the charges against the defendant(s), any evidence, and statements of the victims.  It is the final document that is attached to the investigation file at the end of the investigation.  The indictment (with the entire investigation file) is sent to the court to invest the court with authority over the case.  When this entire file is sent to the court a judge for the case is chosen by an electronic system.   Once this happens, the judge’s clerk will mail summonses to any victim identified in the investigation file.
  • What Can You Do To Advance Victims’ Rights?

    2014: The Year One Million Rise for Victims’ Rights! NCVLI has the resources to help you learn about, talk about, and demand victims’ rights. Click here to learn about the resources available and actions you can take to support victims and advance victims’ rights in the year ahead!
  • What does a Victim’s Lawyer do for the Victim in the Romanian Criminal Justice System?

    There is no requirement that a victim be represented by an attorney in a case in Romania.
  • What does it take to help a crime victim?

    NCVLI recently provided emergency technical assistance to an attorney in Pennsylvania to ensure that a child-victim’s right to privacy was protected.  Because of our legal advocacy, the child-victim need not face the additional trauma of having his private conversation intruded upon.  By donating today you can support this work and help protect a child navigating the criminal justice system.
  • What happens after trial?

    There are three stages of a criminal case in Romania
  • What is Crime Victim Compensation?

    As is described in detail in NCVLI’s Victim Law Bulletin, November 2011, Compensation is money paid from the government to a crime victim to reimburse the victim for certain losses incurred as a result of a crime.
  • What is “online fraud”?

    Fraud that is committed using the internet is “online fraud.”  Online fraud can involve financial fraud and identity theft.
  • Where can I find resources for victims of online fraud and identity theft?

    Here are some specific resources for victims of online fraud and identity theft.
  • Where in the World is NCVLI? June Training Calendar Provides a Glimpse

    As a national resource on victims’ rights, NCVLI criss-crosses the country training on the what, why & how of victims’ rights enforcement. Click here to see where we are training this month.
  • Why do Trials Take so Long in Romania?

    Once a case is presented to the first instance (trial) court, cases do not proceed as quickly as they do in the United States.
  • Winchell v. Beard, Case No. 34-3014-80001968 (Cal. Super. Ct. Jan. 30, 2015)

    Winchell v. Beard, Case No. 34-3014-80001968 (Cal. Super. Ct. Jan. 30, 2015).  The petitioners, relatives of murder victims, petitioned the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to adopt lethal injection regulations that are in compliance with state and federal law, which CDCR denied.  Until such regulations are adopted, the convicted murderers of the victims cannot be executed.  The petitioners then sought a writ of mandate directing CDCR to promulgate such regulations.  The CDCR demurred to the petition, arguing that the petitioners lacked standing and that the CDCR’s actions are not subject to writ relief.  The court first found that the petitioners did have standing to sue.  The court explained that to have standing, a petitioner must show that he is “beneficially interested in the outcome.”  The court found that the petitioners were beneficially interested in the outcome given their status as crime victims.
  • Wiredu v. State, — A.3d —, 2015 WL 1500837 (Md. Ct. Spec. App. Apr. 2, 2015)

    Defendant was convicted of reckless driving, second-degree assault, indecent exposure, and public urination.  Defendant appealed, arguing, inter alia, that the court imposed an improper sentence when it ordered him to pay restitution to the victim’s wife for her lost wages.  Under Maryland law, the court held that restitution may be ordered for lost wages incurred by the victim of the offense but not for lost wages incurred by the spouse of a victim.  The state argued that the court should recharacterize the lost wages incurred by the victim’s wife as “actual medical … expenses or losses” and/or “expenses incurred with rehabilitation,” as the victim’s wife lost her wages while caring for her husband.  The Court of Special Appeals held that the state did not initially seek restitution for the lost wages of the victim’s wife under this theory, and instead categorized the lost wages of both the victim and his wife as separate from medical and rehabilitation expenses.  The appellate court held that “[i]t would not be appropriate … to recast on appeal the State’s request and the circuit court’s characterization of the restitution award.”  Because the award of lost wages incurred by the victim’s wife exceeded the court’s authority under Maryland’s restitution provisions, the order of restitution was vacated with respect to the lost wages of the victim’s wife, and the case was remanded for entry of a corrected restitution award.
  • Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault (WCASA)

    (608) 257-1516
    WCASA is a membership agency comprised of organizations and individuals working to end sexual violence in Wisconsin. Among these are the 51 sexual assault service agencies throughout the state that offer support, advocacy and information to victims of sexual assault and their families. Referrals to local providers are available on their website.
  • Wisconsin Office of Crime Victims Services

    Wisconsin, USA
    To ensure that people affected by crime are treated with fairness, dignity and respect. To help victims exercise their rights & access services; to provide financial assistance to victims and to the programs that serve them; to advocate for public policy and resources to enhance and expand victims’ rights and services; to provide information to the public, policy-makers and professionals about issues affecting crime victims in Wisconsin; to educate, train and provide technical assistance to professionals assisting victims of crime.
  • Working to Dispel Rape Myths

    It is far too common that victims of sexual assault are subjected to invasions of privacy during the investigation and prosecution of their offenders and that cultural assumptions about rape and rape victims inform the administration of justice.  NCVLI’s Responding to Violence Against Women Project is committed to ensuring that the justice process does not become a re-traumatizing experience for victims of sexual assault.  NCVLI recently provided support in a case dealing with these very issues.
  • Wyoming Attorney General Victim Services

    (307) 777-7200
    The Wyoming Attorney General’s Office Division of Victim Services provides information about victims’ rights in Wyoming and assistance understanding the criminal justice system.
  • Wyoming Crime Victim Compensation

    (888) 996-8816
    This program provides financial assistance to victims of crime for expenses such as medical and counseling costs, loss of wages, loss of support, and funeral costs.
  • Youth, Rights and Justice

    Youth, Rights & Justice serves children and youth-primarily those in foster care-who are abused, neglected or in trouble; students who face challenges at school; and parents who need help keeping their families intact.