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  • Steven Mitchell Carpenter died July 16, 2016, after a short illness. He was 61 years old.

    Steven was born April 8, 1955, in Miles City, Montana. He attended The Dalles High School in Oregon. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in French, he worked as the assistant regional director of public affairs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Portland. He then earned a JD, following which he worked in private practice, focusing on products liability and professional malpractice defense.

    Steven joined the Professional Liability Fund (PLF) as a claims attorney in 2000. He spoke and wrote widely on lawyer liability issues, but will be most remembered for his compassion for lawyers facing malpractice claims. Throughout his professional career, Steven made many friends and enjoyed working with many wonderful colleagues.

    A former member of the Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, Steven was an avid supporter of all the arts. His passions included cooking, traveling (especially to France), and his Dobermans.

    Steven is survived by his parents, Don and Juanita Carpenter; his brothers, Mike and Lynn Carpenter; nephew Kyle Carpenter, with his wife Jennifer and their son Conley; nephew Cory Carpenter, with his wife Karyn; and numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins, as well as countless friends.

  •  Passed away on August 27, 2016.

  • Norman David Malbin JD ’85 died of heart failure on October 1, 2017, at the age of 68.

    A Portland labor lawyer who served for more than two decades as general counsel for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 48, Norman was an influential and highly respected figure in the Oregon labor movement. Hundreds of union activists were trained at the annual Oregon Labor Law Conference, which he founded in 1996 and directed until his retirement three years ago. He wrote a pamphlet while still in private practice, explaining wage and hour law in layperson’s language. It is still widely read by workers of all trades who deal with wage theft and other abuses of nonunion contractors.

    Norman inherited a passion for social justice from his parents, both of whom paid a price for their convictions during the McCarthy era. His father, Dr. Morris Malbin, treated workers in Portland’s shipyards during World War II and was instrumental in setting up Kaiser’s pioneering group health insurance plan for union members during and after the war. Dr. Malbin also passed along a passion for sailing to his son, who always joked that he wanted to be a tugboat captain when he grew up.

    Norman studied psychology at the University of Denver, planning to be a child psychologist. He took a series of jobs with nonprofits dealing with youth unemployment and delinquency, but a stint as director of research for the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries sparked an interest in labor law, and he began taking night classes at Lewis & Clark Law School.

    Norman spent three years with two different firms before opening his own office. He served both unions and individual workers without union protection. At IBEW Local 48 Norman provided free legal services at the union hall, where union members could get advice on a wide variety of legal problems. Though he formally retired in 2014, he continued to do work for IBEW. Two of the last projects Norman worked on were union research on job discrimination against women electricians and a grant proposal for FASCETS, a pioneering nonprofit founded by his sister Diane Malbin to educate people about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and other neurobehavioral conditions.

    Behind Norm’s take-charge personality and booming voice was a caring and sensitive man with a big heart and a wonderful sense of humor. He was skilled at conflict resolution and generous in spirit and deed, extending himself time and again to people needing help. He loved a good argument, not just for the thrill of competition but out of genuine curiosity and confidence that his adversaries had something to teach him. He took pride in the fact that his children were both union members and politically active. He was most in his element sailing the Columbia River and the San Juan Islands, coaching his sons’ soccer teams during their respective middle school years, and gathering with family and friends on the Washougal River. If people were singing, he could be counted on to join in with his deep bass voice.

    Norman is survived by Wendy Temko, his wife of 38 years; sons Ben and Zak; daughter-in-law Nicole; grandchildren Remy and Tessa; two sisters; and a large family of close relationships and deep friendships.

  • Paul Gordon Mackey JD ’68 passed away on December 19, 2017. He was 82 years old. Paul worked in the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office from 1968 until 1972 and in the Multnomah County Counsel’s Office from 1972 until his retirement in 1990.

  • Henry Smith Kane JD ’61 died January 11, 2017. He was 90 years old.

    Born in New York City, Henry served in the Army during World War II before earning a BS from the University of Oregon. He switched to law after working as a reporter for The Dalles Chronicle and the Oregon Journal. Henry then served as an Oregon assistant attorney general before going into private practice.

    Henry was married for 47 years to Dorothy Jeanne Kane, who died in 1997. Two of their sons, Mark and James, also preceded Henry in death.

    Henry is survived by his son John, three grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

  • The Honorable Dale Jacobs passed away February 20, 2016, in Wilsonville, Oregon. He was 97 years old.

    Born October 2, 1918, in Madison, Nebraska, to Elmer Dale and Mae Jacobs, Dale was the middle of five brothers and had three younger sisters. His early life was spent in Nebraska and Kansas. In 1936, he graduated from Gering High School, where he met his future wife, Vida Gering. They were to be inseparable for the next 75 years.

    Vida and Dale married on Christmas Eve in 1939 and moved to Portland in 1942 with their baby daughter. He worked in the shipyards during World War II, and later sold men’s clothing while attending evening law school. Dale became a deputy district attorney in Clackamas County after passing the bar and went into private practice in Oregon City in 1950. His skills as a trial lawyer were legendary.

    Dale was appointed Clackamas County circuit court judge in 1971 by Governor Tom McCall, and served on the bench until his retirement in 1987. He performed in excess of 1,000 marriages and, as a senior judge after his retirement, took part in many hearings for the mentally impaired. He also had a long and distinguished legal career speaking in numerous CLEs and authoring many articles, including the demonstrative evidence chapter in The Oregon Evidence Handbook.

    The Clackamas County Bar, of which he was once president, honored Dale with their highest accolade, the Ralph M. Holman Lifetime Achievement Award. He also received the Oregon State Bar’s 50-year member award.

    A tireless citizen in his community, Dale was named Oregon City Senior First Citizen in 1959 and served as chair of the Oregon City School District Board. He was a founding board member of Willamette Falls Hospital, a president and board member of the Chamber of Commerce, a chair of the Oregon City Red Cross, a vice-chair of the United Fund Campaign, and a founding member and first president of Willamette Valley Country Club.

    In his later years, afflicted with macular degeneration, Dale listened to just about every nonfiction book offered by Oregon Talking Books and loved conversation on all topics, whether it be religion, biology, astronomy, baseball, politics, or physics. While he could be serious on these subjects, he was not without a sense of humor and was never at a loss for a good joke. Dale’s lifelong study of religion and philosophy led him to atheism, and he authored a scholarly article on the trial of Jesus. He had no fear of death, embracing it as a part of the life cycle, and was courageous to the end.

    Golf was Dale’s lifelong passion. He helped support himself during the Depression by working as a caddie, and he later spent a portion of every year in the Palm Springs area, where he followed the Bob Hope Desert Classic. He also played in numerous local tournaments, most notably the Oregon Coast Open in Astoria, where he was a medalist in 1962. The Clackamas County Bar honors his golfing prowess with an annual tournament in his name, the DJ Open.

    Dale was preceded in death by his wife, Vida, who passed away in 2009, and by his son Steve, who died in 2011. He is survived by his daughter, Toni Clay; son Jeff Jacobs; three sisters; many nieces and nephews; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

  • Michael D. Henderson JD ’69 passed away May 18, 2018. He was 77 years old. After earning his law degree, Michael worked at the district attorney’s office in Grants Pass, Oregon. He soon started a private practice as a criminal defense attorney. Michael loved the outdoors, spending his free time fishing, skiing, and riding horseback. Survivors include his significant other, Annie; sons Martin and Michael; stepdaughter Jackie; four grandchildren; and one step-grandchild.

  • Gregory Michael Ellis JD ’99 died unexpectedly of a massive heart attack on February 7, 2018 in Portland. He was 58 years old.

    Greg was born in Corvallis, Oregon, on October 31, 1959, to Lyle Ellis and Helen Sawin Ellis. He attended Pacific Lutheran University, the University of Oregon, and Oregon State University, from which he graduated in 1983 with a BA in sociology. During his years at OSU, Greg was involved with Community Outreach, working with crisis intervention teams and training volunteer staff for dealing with community information and referral services. He also served an internship with the Benton County Misdemeanant Parole and Probation Department worked on fire crews for the U.S. Forestry Service during his summers.

    Greg spent his senior year of college as an exchange student in the International Division at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan. For the next several years, he taught English as a second language in Hiroshima, Osaka, and Kyoto before moving on to teaching and administrative positions at Tokai Gakuen Women’s College in Nagoya.

    Greg received an MAT from the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont, in 1994. In 1996, he decided to pursue his law degree.

    In 2013, Greg joined Folktime Riverstone Center and Clackamas County Behavior Health, where he worked in crisis intervention and counseling. He was very dedicated to his job and clients and he will be sorely missed by the many people whose lives he touched.

    Greg is survived by his wife and childhood sweetheart, Margaret (Risley) Ashmore; his beloved son, Kentaro “Kenny” Lee Ellis, and Kenny’s mother, Takae Fukishima; his parents, Lyle and Helen Ellis; his brother, Glen; and several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

  • The Honorable Anthony “Tony” L. Casciato died of congestive heart failure September 7, 2015. He was 97 years old.

    Tony was born on November 1, 1917, in Portland. He and his twin brother, Alfredo (who died in infancy), were the fifth and sixth children of Giuseppe and Teresina Casciato. Tony graduated from Commerce (later Cleveland) High School. He attended Multnomah College and the University of Portland, graduating from the latter in 1941. Tony worked for the Bonneville Power Administration until he was drafted in 1942. Following his return from service during World War II, he studied law.

    In 1950, Tony married Dolores “Dede” Carlo. They had four children.

    Admitted to the bar in 1951, Tony practiced law until 1971, when he was appointed to the municipal bench (later the District/Circuit Court) for Multnomah County. He retired in 1993.

    Love of family, friends, the law, and sports characterized Tony’s life. A quintessential family man, he instilled in his children a sense of fair play, a love of learning, a ferocious work ethic, and an abiding loyalty to family and friends. His love for his old neighborhood of South Portland and its denizens never left him and to the very end, nothing made him happier than recounting stories from his youth. He considered the law a noble profession and saw it as a tool for helping others. Sports, particularly baseball, were both a passion and a solace. A gifted athlete, he played semi-pro baseball in his youth and never lost his love for the game or his favorite team, the New York Yankees. One of the greatest experiences of his life was attending the Yankees fantasy baseball camp at the age of 82 with his son Peter. He was a devoted member of the Multnomah Athletic Club, where he played squash for many years.

    Although he could be somewhat reserved, Tony enjoyed the company of others. He was particularly good with very young children, entering into their lives and interests with enthusiasm and gusto. To older children and young adults, he was an approachable father figure, someone who could offer thoughtful advice and sympathetic understanding. In his professional capacity he was a mentor and guide to legions of young lawyers, many of whom credit their subsequent success to his wise counsel. Those who were old or sick found in him a sympathetic presence and a ready listener.

    A voracious reader, Tony routinely read the newspaper—paying special attention to the sports coverage—and all the books he could get his hands on. He was particularly fond of history and biography. Art was another favorite activity.

    Tony was preceded in death by his wife, Dede, and his son Peter. He is survived by his son Tom; his daughters, Mary Jo Binker and Nancy Casciato; his daughters-in-law, Regina Casciato and Kathleen Hughes; his sons-in-law, Roland Binker and Kenn Walton; six grandchildren; and many devoted relatives and friends.

  • Alvin “Al” Lawrence Andrews passed away December 25, 2015, at his home. He was 88 years old.

    Al was born March 12, 1927, to Ellis and Leona Andrews. He was raised in Ontario, Oregon, where he lived until graduating from high school and joining the U.S. Navy near the end of World War II. Following his discharge, Al attended Eastern Oregon State College and the University of Oregon until he was recalled to active duty at the onset of the Korean conflict to serve aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Boxer. After his military service he completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Oregon.

    Al worked as partner in the firm of Fitzwater, Fitzwater and Andrews before beginning a solo neighborhood practice in North Portland in the late 1960s. He closed his office in early 2000 to become a full-time caregiver for his beloved wife, Darlene (Devine), whose death preceded his.

    Al was a member of the Oregon State Bar, Bethel Baptist Church, and Peninsula Kiwanis Club for over 50 years. He was a longtime supporter of the Mount Hood Kiwanis Camp for children with special needs. He was also a member of the U.S.S. Boxer Association and had an interest in hunting, hiking, genealogy, stained glass, music, and the Oregon Ducks.

    Al is survived by his children, Connie Stahly, Kris Wilkinson, Steve Andrews, Dixon Andrews, and Tony Andrews; two sisters, Florence Conant and Margaret Diehl; 12 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and close friend Betty Doble.

 

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