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  •  Passed away on August 27, 2016.

  • Garrett A. Richardson passed away on November 13, 2015, at the age of 61.

    Garrett attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill before earning his law degree. In 1981, he began working for Multnomah Defenders, Inc., a private nonprofit that contracted with the state to provide defenses for indigent defendants. Garrett went on to have a long career as a Portland public defender.

    Garrett is survived by his wife, Kaylynne; his mother, Michaeline Richardson; and his brother.

  • Marvin Nepom died in November 2014 at the age of 88. Born in Portland of immigrant parents, he attended the University of Washington. It was there that he met his wife, whom he married at the age of 21. After a decade in the grocery business, and with the encouragement of Leo Levinson, Marvin began to attend law school in the evening. While a student, he frequently told his three young children bedtime stories that incorporated law school themes.

    After passing the bar in 1962, Marvin handled a broad array of cases before concentrating on personal injury litigation as a solo practitioner. He served as president of the Multnomah Bar Association for 1981–82.

    Marvin is survived by Leah, his wife of 67 years; three children; four grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

  • Robert “Bob” Ringo JD ’51 passed away on April 5, 2017, at the age of 92.

    Born in Spokane, Washington, on August 18, 1924, Bob moved with his family to Portland as a young child. He joined the Army Air Corps as soon as he graduated high school, becoming a commissioned flight officer and fighting in World War II as a bombardier in the 95th Bomb Squadron, 17th Bomb Group. Bob received several medals and honors, and was named Veteran of the Year in 2010.

    Following his service, Bob attended the University of Oregon, where he also began his legal education. He transferred to Northwestern School of Law in order to assist his mother, who lived in Portland. Shortly after graduating, he began a law practice in Corvallis while also working part-time as a deputy assistant attorney. Bob had a long and distinguished career as a trial attorney, developing a respected law firm that grew to its current formation of Ringo, Stuber, Ensor, Hadlock & Smith PC. He also served as president of the Oregon Trial Lawyers Association, was named Oregon Trial Lawyer of the Year, and served on many boards, including the Oregon State Board of Bar Governors and the American Board of Trial Advocates.

    An active philanthropist, Bob supported many causes. Closest to his heart was the Good Samaritan Hospital, for which he led the governing and foundation boards and which he helped to provide free mental health care to local veterans.

    Bob was a devoted family man and lived life to the fullest. He is survived by four of his five children: Molly, Charlie, Julie, and Mary Ellen. He is preceded in death by his son, Robert Irvin, who died in 2011; his first wife, Kathryn Reese, to whom he was married for 37 years, and who passed in 1989; and his second wife, Jane Crider, to whom he was married for 20 years, and who passed in 2013.

  • The Honorable Karl W. Freerksen Jr. passed away on January 13, 2015, after living with Parkinson’s disease for nearly 11 years. He was born January 21, 1936, in Freeport, Illinois, to Karl Walter Sr. and Dorothy Elaine (Haines) Freerksen. When Karl was five years old, the family moved to Cedar Mill, Oregon, where he attended Cedar Mill and Sylvan Grade Schools. He graduated from Beaverton High School in 1953 with plans to become a lawyer. After earning a bachelor’s degree from Willamette University in 1957, Karl served six years of active duty with the National Guard to earn enough money to attend law school.

    Early in his career, Karl had a general law practice in Beaverton with eight other attorneys, constituting the largest firm in the county. He was asked in 1973 to serve as judge pro-tem under the pilot program funded by the Legislature. Karl was the last judge to be appointed by Governor Tom McCall, in 1974. He served as the presiding district judge and president of the Oregon District Judges’ Association, and in 1997 he completed the mediation course at the National Judicial College. Karl retired in 1998 after 25 years of service as a circuit judge, though he continued to serve as a judge pro-tem. He said that he found life on the bench more enjoyable than private practice, because it was more predictable. “The cases are different every day, but you generally know what they are going to be about. Also, I never had a paid vacation until I became a judge!”

    Karl wed Barbara Sue VanHoutin on September 26, 1970. In 1977, they built a home north of North Plains, where they enjoyed gardening, the deer, the view of the coast range, and hosting picnics and other events. They were particularly fond of ballroom dancing. Karl’s many interests included hunting trips with his brothers, fly fishing, wood working, golfing, travel, and socializing with friends and family members.

    A member of Kiwanis and the Jaycees while in Beaverton, Karl joined the Hillsboro Rotary Club in 1980 and served on the board of directors for the Rotary Foundation. He also served on the board of trustees at the Hillsboro United Methodist Church and St. Mary’s School for Boys, and was active in the Washington County and North Plains Historical Societies.

    Karl was preceded in death by his parents and his brother Gerald Allan Freerksen. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; brother Gene Freerksen; sister-in-law Linda Freerksen; several nieces and nephews; and many cousins.

  • Gary Marlette died on February 16, 2016, at his home. He was 76 years old.

    Gary was born on March 26, 1939, in Redfield, South Dakota. He attended Redfield High School, where he was a football and track athlete, a member of the glee and chorus clubs, and active in many other student organizations.

    Soon after he graduated high school, Gary’s family moved to Longview, Washington, and he enrolled at St. Martin’s College in Lacey. In 1964, he began law school and married JoAnn Berks. The couple moved to Baker, Oregon, after Gary graduated and he practiced law there until he retired in 2007. He and his family enjoyed many summers on the Snake River while bird hunting, fishing, camping, boating, and skiing.

    Gary is survived by his wife, two daughters, a daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.

  • Constance “Connie” Emerson Crooker died April 10, 2015, at her home. She was 68 years old.

    Connie was born July 23, 1946, in Portland, Maine, to Reverend Charles W. Crooker and Elizabeth (MacGregor) Crooker Bates. She earned a BA from Reed College.

    Connie established a criminal defense practice focusing on the Hispanic community and led efforts in Oregon to professionalize the use of interpreters in the courts. She was also the first woman in Oregon to contract with the state to run a Public Defenders office, serving the community of Tillamook for many years.

    Following her retirement Connie avidly pursued a wide array of interests, including skiing, hiking, camping, dancing, singing, and playing the guitar. She also relished traveling abroad and studying foreign languages. One of her passions was writing. Connie wrote and published several books, including Melanoma Mama: On Life, Death, and Tent Camping, in which she shared her experiences on a solo cross-country trip to celebrate her unexpected reprieve from ongoing cancer treatments, and Doc Jackson’s Letters Home: A Combat Medic’s 1968 Letters From Vietnam, which was released on April 30, 2015, the 40th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam conflict.

    Survivors include her three siblings and their spouses: Carol and Deane Farnsworth, Charles and Adrian Crooker, and Catherine Crooker and Griff O’Brien. Connie
    is also survived by numerous nieces and nephews.

  • Norman David Malbin JD ’85 died of heart failure on October 1, 2017, at the age of 68.

    A Portland labor lawyer who served for more than two decades as general counsel for International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 48, Norman was an influential and highly respected figure in the Oregon labor movement. Hundreds of union activists were trained at the annual Oregon Labor Law Conference, which he founded in 1996 and directed until his retirement three years ago. He wrote a pamphlet while still in private practice, explaining wage and hour law in layperson’s language. It is still widely read by workers of all trades who deal with wage theft and other abuses of nonunion contractors.

    Norman inherited a passion for social justice from his parents, both of whom paid a price for their convictions during the McCarthy era. His father, Dr. Morris Malbin, treated workers in Portland’s shipyards during World War II and was instrumental in setting up Kaiser’s pioneering group health insurance plan for union members during and after the war. Dr. Malbin also passed along a passion for sailing to his son, who always joked that he wanted to be a tugboat captain when he grew up.

    Norman studied psychology at the University of Denver, planning to be a child psychologist. He took a series of jobs with nonprofits dealing with youth unemployment and delinquency, but a stint as director of research for the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries sparked an interest in labor law, and he began taking night classes at Lewis & Clark Law School.

    Norman spent three years with two different firms before opening his own office. He served both unions and individual workers without union protection. At IBEW Local 48 Norman provided free legal services at the union hall, where union members could get advice on a wide variety of legal problems. Though he formally retired in 2014, he continued to do work for IBEW. Two of the last projects Norman worked on were union research on job discrimination against women electricians and a grant proposal for FASCETS, a pioneering nonprofit founded by his sister Diane Malbin to educate people about Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and other neurobehavioral conditions.

    Behind Norm’s take-charge personality and booming voice was a caring and sensitive man with a big heart and a wonderful sense of humor. He was skilled at conflict resolution and generous in spirit and deed, extending himself time and again to people needing help. He loved a good argument, not just for the thrill of competition but out of genuine curiosity and confidence that his adversaries had something to teach him. He took pride in the fact that his children were both union members and politically active. He was most in his element sailing the Columbia River and the San Juan Islands, coaching his sons’ soccer teams during their respective middle school years, and gathering with family and friends on the Washougal River. If people were singing, he could be counted on to join in with his deep bass voice.

    Norman is survived by Wendy Temko, his wife of 38 years; sons Ben and Zak; daughter-in-law Nicole; grandchildren Remy and Tessa; two sisters; and a large family of close relationships and deep friendships.

  • The Honorable John B. Lewis passed away June 7, 2016. He was 69 years old.

    John received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from Portland State University. He became a sole practitioner shortly after earning his JD and was named a Hillsboro municipal court judge in 1980. John was a Washington County district and circuit court trial judge from 1993 to 2006, the last seven years of which he was the presiding family and juvenile court judge.

    Following his 2006 retirement, he started a mediation and reference judge practice with another retired judge, Al Bonebrake. John handled hundreds of cases in this capacity, ranging in type from civil and domestic relations to contracts, personal injury, wrongful death, and medical malpractice.

    John is survived by his wife, Linda, and a daughter. In lieu of flowers, his family requests that gifts be made to a Lewis & Clark Law School scholarship in John’s name.

  • Steven Mitchell Carpenter died July 16, 2016, after a short illness. He was 61 years old.

    Steven was born April 8, 1955, in Miles City, Montana. He attended The Dalles High School in Oregon. After receiving a bachelor’s degree in French, he worked as the assistant regional director of public affairs for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Portland. He then earned a JD, following which he worked in private practice, focusing on products liability and professional malpractice defense.

    Steven joined the Professional Liability Fund (PLF) as a claims attorney in 2000. He spoke and wrote widely on lawyer liability issues, but will be most remembered for his compassion for lawyers facing malpractice claims. Throughout his professional career, Steven made many friends and enjoyed working with many wonderful colleagues.

    A former member of the Portland Gay Men’s Chorus, Steven was an avid supporter of all the arts. His passions included cooking, traveling (especially to France), and his Dobermans.

    Steven is survived by his parents, Don and Juanita Carpenter; his brothers, Mike and Lynn Carpenter; nephew Kyle Carpenter, with his wife Jennifer and their son Conley; nephew Cory Carpenter, with his wife Karyn; and numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins, as well as countless friends.

 

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