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    • 07/07/2020

      Ward S. Armstrong JD ’66 passed away peacefully September 5, 2015, in Salem, Oregon, surrounded by family and the love of lifelong friends. He was 82 years old.

      Born October 13, 1932, in Eugene, Oregon, to Hubert and Elizabeth Armstrong, Ward graduated from Newberg High School in 1950. He attended Willamette University, where he met his partner for life, Donna Marie Leonard, whom he married on December 27, 1959.

      Ward earned a bachelor’s degree in forestry from Oregon State University. In 1961, he began work as director of the Association of Oregon Counties in Salem. Ward accepted a job as Oregon director of governmental affairs for Weyerhaeuser in 1966, embarking on a career as a lobbyist and public policy specialist that defined the remainder of his working life.

      In 1978, Ward, Donna, and their three children moved to Federal Way, Washington, so Ward could manage Weyerhaeuser’s governmental affairs program. The family returned to Salem in 1986 when Ward was named executive director of the Oregon Forest Industries Council. He “retired” in 1994, after which he accepted a position managing the Executive Seminar Program at Portland State University’s Mark O. Hatfield School of Government. He would remain there for 10 years.

      A past president of the Salem Tennis & Swim Club, Ward was also an active member of the Methodist Church in Salem and Bellevue and the Salem Downtown Rotary Club. He served on the state Easter Seals Board and was a trustee on the Oregon State University Foundation.

      Cycling was a special passion. Ward completed many Seattle-to-Portland bike rides, the Oregon Bicycle Ride, RAGBRAI, and the Idaho Bike Ride.

      Ward is survived by his wife and children Ken, Mark, and Diane; grandchildren Grace, Abby, Lucy, and Alice; and his brothers Hugh of Seattle and Richard of Salem.

    • 12/20/2019

      Jean Marguerite Davis-Johnson JD ’78 passed away peacefully at home December 8, 2019, from Alzheimer’s disease. She was 69 years old.

      Jean was born July 16, 1950, in Spokane to Walter Z. Davis Sr. and Betty Jean Berg. She graduated from Lewis and Clark High School, earning a BA from Whitman College and an MA from the University of Washington before attending law school.

      Jean married Stephen Johnson, her high school sweetheart, on September 2, 1972. She left law practice to be a full-time mother to their three sons. Jean also donated her time to support local education, art, and music organizations in various capacities. She was a master gardener, birdwatcher, art and antique enthusiast, nature lover, reader, and lifelong student of American and Pacific Northwest history. She was also a member of Spokane’s St. Mark’s Lutheran Church.

      Jean was predeceased by her father and mother. She is survived by her husband; her three sons, Gregory, Timothy, and Eric; her four grandchildren, Noah (9), Silas (6), Merritt (3), and Makenna (1); and her three older brothers, Walter Jr., Eric, and Paul.

    • 11/08/2019

      Heather R. Self JD ’01, October 22, 2019, age 43.

    • 01/10/2020

      Edward Murray Collins JD ’84 died unexpectedly following a cardiac event on December 12, 2019. He was 64 years old.

      The first child of Samuel and Dorothy Collins, Ed was born in Rockland, Maine, on June 12, 1955. After he earned a BA in environmental studies from George Washington University, he worked for Maine Congressional Representative David F. Emery in Rockland and Washington, D.C., as a legislative assistant focusing on environmental and marine matters.

      Ed became a member of the Maine Bar in 1984 and began practicing in Rockland in 1985, when he joined his father at the firm currently known as Hanscom and Collins, PA. He was active with the nonprofits North Haven Foundation, North Haven Development Corporation, Megunticook Watershed Association, and St. George Community Sailing, and was on the boards of the Farnsworth Art Museum, the Camden Public Library, the Georges River Land Trust, and the Mid-Coast Mental Health Association. Ed was also president of the Rockland Cemetery Association and a board member of the MCH Neighbor Foundation and the Center for Maine Contemporary Arts. He was president of the Knox County Bar Association and a member of the Maine Bar Association.

      Ed loved being outside and especially enjoyed canoeing, kayaking, water-skiing, snow skiing, and gardening. He shared this love of the outdoors with his children, family, and friends. He also loved a good debate. A great cook, Ed worked hard to create the perfect loaf of French bread.

      Ed is survived by his partner, Susan Trenholm; his children, Jane R. Collins, S. Wilson Collins, Abigail E. Goodridge, and Emma M. Collins; his sisters, Elizabeth Collins Macomber and Diane Collins Field; his aunt Barbara Lebel; and many nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends.

    • 02/06/2020

      Jerry Sparks JD ’74 died January 16, 2020, at age 81.

      An avid outdoorsman, Sparks was a forestry engineer with Hampton Tree Farms for more than 30 years. He loved doing anything outdoors, including just soaking up the sun in a chair.

      Sparks earned his JD while working at Hampton and kept in touch with his friends from Lewis & Clark, as well as those from Clatskanie, Oregon State University, Hampton Tree Farms, McMinnville, and Crooked River, throughout his life.

      Sparks was devoted to his extensive family and will be missed by them. He was “Uncle Jerry” not only to his nieces and nephews, but to many others as well.

      Sparks is survived by his wife, Billie; his children, Ken, Nancy, Chad, and Jane; and his grandchildren.

    • 12/18/2019

      Lillian Meyers JD ’64 died May 24, 2019, just shy of her 97th birthday.

      Lillian was born May 27, 1922, in Melba, Idaho, to Iva and James Cason. She was the fourth of eight children, sibling to Ella, Lee, Betty, Marie, Jamie, Richard, and Jean. The family moved to Burns, Oregon, when Lillian was an infant. While in high school she worked for the Burns Times Herald, the Weather Bureau, the hospital, and the courthouse. It was while working in the last of these that Lillian became inspired by the law and decided to become an attorney, despite all obstacles. This independent outlook and strength of character served her well throughout her life.

      In 1942 Lillian married Edward Meyers. They bought 45 acres on the Clackamas River, where they raised their five children. Lillian and Edward divorced in 1970.

      Friends introduced Lillian to Paul Olenik, who became her second husband in 1978. The couple spent many wonderful years traveling and enjoying life until Paul’s untimely death in 1997. After his passing, Lillian continued to travel and spend time with family and friends.

      Lillian was a proud Oregonian and never lost her connection to and love of Burns and the high desert. She returned as often as possible with her children to visit family and travel the back roads of the Steens Mountains and the Malheur Wildlife Refuge.

      It was only in her last seven years that dementia diminished the quality of her very full life. Lillian was predeceased by her parents, her husbands, and her oldest daughter, Lynne. She is survived by her children Edward, Leslie, John, and Mona; her stepchildren Bethany, Jeff, John, David, Theresa, and Cindy; a granddaughter; and three great-grandchildren.

    • 02/21/2019

      Virginia “Gin” Lauritsen JD ’75, February 14, 2019, age 78. 

      Gin moved in 1943 from Arkansas, after the mill where her father worked burned and his employer offered him a job in Oregon. The family lived in Finn Rock and the Vida area before moving to Springfield in 1948. Gin earned a bachelor’s degree in math and chemistry from Oregon State University and a master’s degree in mathematics from Arizona State University.

      Gin worked as in-house counsel for a number of companies in California, including Universal Television and BP, before retiring and moving back to Springfield in 1995. In 1998, a friend suggested she serve on the Lane Transit District’s budget committee. A short time later, the governor appointed Gin to the LTD board, on which she would serve for eight years. A year into that appointment, she ran for the Springfield Utility Board seat she would hold for two decades. Gin was recognized for her public service by the Lane Council of Governments and Springfield Chamber of Commerce.

      Over the years, Gin also volunteered as a nature guide at Dorris Ranch. “Springfield is home,” she said in an 2010 interview. “I measure where I am on this planet by how far I am from Springfield.”

      Gin is survived by one of her three sisters, Anne Ballew, as well as three nephews.

    • 07/10/2015

      Richard “Dick” John Whittemore JD ’92 passed away unexpectedly on July 5, 2015, having suffered cardiac arrest following a weekend of racing his BMW 325 in Auburn, Washington. He was 59 years old.

      Dick was born January 19, 1956, in Portland to Dr. James P. and Mary Margaret Whittemore. He attended St. Thomas More Grade School and Jesuit High School, from which he graduated in 1974. He earned a BA cum laude in philosophy from Colorado College in 1978. While a law student, Dick worked nights at Abernethy’s Restaurant so he could serve a clerkship for Multnomah County Circuit Court Judge Charles Crookham. He remained close to Crookham and delivered a eulogy at the judge’s funeral service in 2004.

      Dick joined the firm of Bullivant Houser Bailey in 1984 and was a senior shareholder. An expert in product liability defense, clergy malpractice, medical malpractice, and commercial litigation, he was a member of the Oregon, Washington, and Idaho bar associations and practiced law for more than 30 years. “Dick was the consummate professional and partner and a tremendous legal advocate equally respected by his clients, adversaries, and judges hearing his cases,” said Loren Podwill, president of Bullivant Houser Bailey. “He was a devoted teacher, spending endless hours working with newer lawyers, teaching them the tools of the trade and professionalism, and volunteering his time to judge local and national legal competitions. Dick carried himself through the world with confidence, grace, and dignity.” He had a reputation for speaking softly, listening intently, and thinking logically.

      Dick had a deep respect for the law, but his personal passion was motor racing. He traveled the Pacific Northwest participating in Sports Car Club of America races and collected numerous checkered flags throughout his racing career.

      In 1997, Dick was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and underwent six months of aggressive treatment. During this time, his dedication to his clients and his firm never wavered, and he continued to work at a high level. In 2008, Dick was diagnosed with a more aggressive form of NHL, but he succeeded in surviving both the formidable treatment and the disease with quiet strength.

      Dick was a member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Board of Trial Advocates, which he served as national board representative president-elect. He was a member of the Oregon Association of Defense Counsel and served as a regional judge for the 2015 National Trial Competition of the Texas Young Lawyers Association. He was also a member of the Multnomah Athletic Club and the University Club of Portland, which he served as president in 2006.

      Dick is survived by his loving wife of 10 years, Carolyn; sisters Kathy Johnson and Susan Honeyman; brother James Whittemore; nieces Libby Rasmussen and Katherine Byrne; and nephews Blake Whittemore, Michael Johnson, Christopher Johnson, Andrew Honeyman, and Kevin Honeyman.

    • 08/17/2016

      Stuart “Stu” Sugarman JD ’91 passed away March 28, 2016, from diabetes-related causes. He was 52 years old.

      Stu was born May 16, 1963, in Jericho, New York. He attended Jericho Senior High School and earned a BS in marine science and biology from the University of Miami.

      A partner at the Portland law firm Warren & Sugarman, Stu was known for his devotion to providing every defendant with a robust representation. He assisted people in their darkest moments and was known to take even the smallest cases seriously. Stu took on numerous pro bono cases, particularly on behalf of activists. He most recently defended—for free—the seven Greenpeace protesters charged in connection with a 2015 incident during which activists suspended themselves from Portland’s St. Johns Bridge in an effort to halt oil drilling in the Arctic.

      Stu was respected and loved by all who knew him. He is remembered for his humor, wit, fairness, honesty, and selflessness. An avid cyclist, Stu was a frequent participator in Portland’s annual World Naked Bike Ride and Cycle Oregon. He was also a longtime volunteer at the Oregon Country Fair.

      Stu is survived by his son, Riley; his mother, Pearl Sugarman; and his siblings Steven and Lori Sugarman, among other relatives.

    • 01/21/2018

      Joseph L. Udall JD ’74, January 21, 2018.

 

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