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Class Notes

From 2000 to 2009

  • Gerald H. Perry ’40, January 15, 2018, age 103. After attending Lewis & Clark, Perry worked as a salesman and apartment manager before being drafted into the U.S. Navy. After returning from military service, he played banjo with the Rose City Banjoliers and the Northwest Banjo Band, traveling all over the world. Survivors include wife Joan; daughters Carolyn and Rosalie; and one grandson.

  • Edith Foleen Zimmerman BA ’42, September 4, 2016, age 96. She married Richard Zimmerman in 1944, and they lived together in Portland until 1959, when they moved to Bend, Oregon, where she was an active member of Foundry Church of Bend. Survivors include her children, Craig and Judy; three grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

  • William D. Harrison ’46, November 4, 2014, age 89.

  • Annie C. Brooks BS ’47, July 5, 2017, age 90. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, Brooks earned a master’s degree in Christian education from San Francisco Theological Seminary. There she met J. Bruce Coleman, whom she later married. Brooks worked as a preschool teacher and volunteered for charities. She enjoyed nature, traveling, gardening, and singing in her church choir. Survivors include her three daughters, Kathleen, Janet, and Joella; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

  • Ann Coleman BS ’47, July 5, 2017, age 90.

  • Ivan V. Gillam BS ’47, April 8, 2018, age 93. After graduating from Lewis & Clark College, Gillam took a job teaching at Carlton (Oregon) High School. After a sojourn in Virginia, where he earned a master’s degree in school administration at William and Mary College, Gillam and family returned to Oregon, where he returned to teaching, eventually retiring in 1984. Outside the classroom, Gillam enjoyed singing and performed with church choirs, at weddings and funerals, and with a barbershop quartet. Other favorite activities included bowling, hunting, and carpentry. Survivors include wife Phyllis; children Gary, Ken, and Gayle; seven grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild.

  • Dorothy Kirkwood Mooney BA ’47, September 3, 2016, age 90. She was a lifelong lover of music and an accomplished pianist and music teacher. In 1953, Dorothy graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary. She went on to serve as the first woman instructor on the faculty there. Soon, Dorothy met Ed Mooney, a young seminarian, over a game of Scrabble, and they were married in 1956. She remained heavily involved in the church; worked as a piano teacher for 54 years; and was involved in a number of community clubs and volunteer groups. Survivors include her husband of 60 years; three sons, Paul, Philip, and Stephen; and five grandchildren.

  • Robert R. Warner BS ’47, February 7, 2018, age 95. Warner married Nancy Burness, with whom he shared 72 years. He started his career in education at McMinnville (Oregon) High School and then worked in sales, eventually retiring from Nordstrom as a men’s clothing salesman. He loved baseball, basketball, and football. Survivors include his children, Greig, Trina, and Nancy; 10 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

  • Carolyn Fairfield BA ’48, April 13, 2018, age 94. Fairfield was one of the founders of the Parkrose United Methodist Church in Portland. She remained active in the leadership of the church until she moved to Prescott, Oregon, to live with her daughter. Survivors include her children, Susan, David, Peter, and Michael; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

  • The Honorable Dale Jacobs passed away February 20, 2016, in Wilsonville, Oregon. He was 97 years old.

    Born October 2, 1918, in Madison, Nebraska, to Elmer Dale and Mae Jacobs, Dale was the middle of five brothers and had three younger sisters. His early life was spent in Nebraska and Kansas. In 1936, he graduated from Gering High School, where he met his future wife, Vida Gering. They were to be inseparable for the next 75 years.

    Vida and Dale married on Christmas Eve in 1939 and moved to Portland in 1942 with their baby daughter. He worked in the shipyards during World War II, and later sold men’s clothing while attending evening law school. Dale became a deputy district attorney in Clackamas County after passing the bar and went into private practice in Oregon City in 1950. His skills as a trial lawyer were legendary.

    Dale was appointed Clackamas County circuit court judge in 1971 by Governor Tom McCall, and served on the bench until his retirement in 1987. He performed in excess of 1,000 marriages and, as a senior judge after his retirement, took part in many hearings for the mentally impaired. He also had a long and distinguished legal career speaking in numerous CLEs and authoring many articles, including the demonstrative evidence chapter in The Oregon Evidence Handbook.

    The Clackamas County Bar, of which he was once president, honored Dale with their highest accolade, the Ralph M. Holman Lifetime Achievement Award. He also received the Oregon State Bar’s 50-year member award.

    A tireless citizen in his community, Dale was named Oregon City Senior First Citizen in 1959 and served as chair of the Oregon City School District Board. He was a founding board member of Willamette Falls Hospital, a president and board member of the Chamber of Commerce, a chair of the Oregon City Red Cross, a vice-chair of the United Fund Campaign, and a founding member and first president of Willamette Valley Country Club.

    In his later years, afflicted with macular degeneration, Dale listened to just about every nonfiction book offered by Oregon Talking Books and loved conversation on all topics, whether it be religion, biology, astronomy, baseball, politics, or physics. While he could be serious on these subjects, he was not without a sense of humor and was never at a loss for a good joke. Dale’s lifelong study of religion and philosophy led him to atheism, and he authored a scholarly article on the trial of Jesus. He had no fear of death, embracing it as a part of the life cycle, and was courageous to the end.

    Golf was Dale’s lifelong passion. He helped support himself during the Depression by working as a caddie, and he later spent a portion of every year in the Palm Springs area, where he followed the Bob Hope Desert Classic. He also played in numerous local tournaments, most notably the Oregon Coast Open in Astoria, where he was a medalist in 1962. The Clackamas County Bar honors his golfing prowess with an annual tournament in his name, the DJ Open.

    Dale was preceded in death by his wife, Vida, who passed away in 2009, and by his son Steve, who died in 2011. He is survived by his daughter, Toni Clay; son Jeff Jacobs; three sisters; many nieces and nephews; nine grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

  • John C. Little BS ’48, November 18, 2014, age 88.

  • Jean McDougal BA ’48, August 1, 2017, age 91. After graduating from Lewis & Clark, she married Douglas in 1952. She was an active member of the Lake Grove (Oregon) Presbyterian Church. McDougal loved to travel and took annual trips abroad with a group of friends from Lewis & Clark called the “Free Spirits.” Survivors include her children, Laura and Tom; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

  • Theodore F. DeBauw BS ’49, December 28, 2014, age 92.

  • Willard D. Gish BS ’49, May 30, 2014, age 95.

  • Jack H. Hutchinson BA ’49, September 3, 2017, age 89. Hutchinson worked as a biochemist for Oregon Health and Science University. He and his wife, Pauly, retired to Long Beach, Washington, where he spent his time hunting, fishing, and tending to the land. Survivors include his wife; his sons, Randy and Mark; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

  • Florence S. Morford BA ’49, July 12, 2017, age 89. Morford married her husband, John, in 1979, and they enjoyed 25 years together. She taught elementary school in Portland for more than 30 years and spent some time in England teaching at a U.S. Air Force school.

  • Ralph E. Smith BS ’49, October 2017, age 92.

  • The Honorable Anthony “Tony” L. Casciato died of congestive heart failure September 7, 2015. He was 97 years old.

    Tony was born on November 1, 1917, in Portland. He and his twin brother, Alfredo (who died in infancy), were the fifth and sixth children of Giuseppe and Teresina Casciato. Tony graduated from Commerce (later Cleveland) High School. He attended Multnomah College and the University of Portland, graduating from the latter in 1941. Tony worked for the Bonneville Power Administration until he was drafted in 1942. Following his return from service during World War II, he studied law.

    In 1950, Tony married Dolores “Dede” Carlo. They had four children.

    Admitted to the bar in 1951, Tony practiced law until 1971, when he was appointed to the municipal bench (later the District/Circuit Court) for Multnomah County. He retired in 1993.

    Love of family, friends, the law, and sports characterized Tony’s life. A quintessential family man, he instilled in his children a sense of fair play, a love of learning, a ferocious work ethic, and an abiding loyalty to family and friends. His love for his old neighborhood of South Portland and its denizens never left him and to the very end, nothing made him happier than recounting stories from his youth. He considered the law a noble profession and saw it as a tool for helping others. Sports, particularly baseball, were both a passion and a solace. A gifted athlete, he played semi-pro baseball in his youth and never lost his love for the game or his favorite team, the New York Yankees. One of the greatest experiences of his life was attending the Yankees fantasy baseball camp at the age of 82 with his son Peter. He was a devoted member of the Multnomah Athletic Club, where he played squash for many years.

    Although he could be somewhat reserved, Tony enjoyed the company of others. He was particularly good with very young children, entering into their lives and interests with enthusiasm and gusto. To older children and young adults, he was an approachable father figure, someone who could offer thoughtful advice and sympathetic understanding. In his professional capacity he was a mentor and guide to legions of young lawyers, many of whom credit their subsequent success to his wise counsel. Those who were old or sick found in him a sympathetic presence and a ready listener.

    A voracious reader, Tony routinely read the newspaper—paying special attention to the sports coverage—and all the books he could get his hands on. He was particularly fond of history and biography. Art was another favorite activity.

    Tony was preceded in death by his wife, Dede, and his son Peter. He is survived by his son Tom; his daughters, Mary Jo Binker and Nancy Casciato; his daughters-in-law, Regina Casciato and Kathleen Hughes; his sons-in-law, Roland Binker and Kenn Walton; six grandchildren; and many devoted relatives and friends.

  • Warren C. Craig ’50, August 6, 2017, age 94. Craig served his country during World War II, earning a Bronze Star. After returning from the war and graduating from Lewis & Clark, he married his wife, Anne, and began his career as an electrician. In retirement, Craig volunteered frequently and was a member of the Tigard (Oregon) Lions Club and Calvin Presbyterian Church. Survivors include his wife of nearly 70 years, Anne; his son, Douglas; and three grandchildren.

  • Margrett L. Devin BA ’50, November 18, 2017, age 89. Soon after graduating from Lewis & Clark, she married Robert Devin. The couple had two sons in 1953 and a daughter in 1964. The family moved extensively around the United States due to Robert’s military service. After her husband’s death in 1990, Devin settled in Apple Valley, California. She loved Shakespeare and language. Survivors include her children, Michael, Steven, and Patricia, and two grandchildren.

  • Marjorie J. Doty BA ’50, August 17, 2017, age 89. After graduating, Doty cofounded Viewcrest Nurseries in Battle Ground, Washington, and played an important managerial role there. At home, she enjoyed gardening and making preserves. Survivors include her husband of 67 years, John; her daughters, Marilyn, Janet, and Barbara; and many loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

  • Marie S. McMillan BA ’50, July 2, 2017, age 89. McMillan met her husband, Richard, while at Lewis & Clark, and they were married in 1949. The couple moved to Cleveland, where McMillan worked as a librarian. They had two children. McMillan was a deacon and active member of her church, as well as a member of the church choir. She enjoyed playing bridge and exercising with friends. Survivors include her children, Kathy and Brad, and five grandchildren.

  • Persis A. Blachly BA ’51, September 13, 2017, age 88. Blachly was a talented pianist and teacher. She taught students in her home and worked as a church organist at several churches. She married Ted Blachly BA ’51 in 1950. Survivors include her husband; children Beth, Andy, and Rachel; and three grandchildren.

  • Barbara I. Godel ’51, May 5, 2018, age 88. Godel worked as a bookkeeper for Chown Hardware before marrying Robert, with whom she would share 64 years. She was active in her local chapter of the Philanthropic Educational Organization, as well as in the Presbyterian Church. Godel enjoyed working creatively in many media, including painting, drawing, and knitting. She also loved to read and play the piano. Survivors include her daughters, Kathleen and Sally, and one grandchild.

 

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