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National Crime Victim Law Institute

Intern Profile: Caroline Diamond

June 03, 2019

Caroline is NCVLI’s newest Summer Development Intern. She will be researching optimal solutions for a recurring donor program, studying grant writing, and building community partnerships. Caroline is also contributing her energy to helping staff prepare for the upcoming National Crime Victim Law Conference. Before interning NCVLI, she was a marketing intern for The Liberty Collective, a growing global consultancy in Portland, OR. Currently, Caroline is a sophomore International Affairs and Economics student at Occidental College in Los Angeles. Caroline joined NCVLI in May 2019. Pronouns: she/her/hers

 

1. Why did you first get interested in interning with NCVLI and working with victims’ rights?

I am passionate about trauma informed advocacy for survivors of sexual assault. I appreciate NCVLI’s approach to victims’ rights – uniting legal advocacy, training and education, and public policy. NCVLI’s dedication to systemic change through a holistic approach to justice work is empowering. I was also interested in NCVLI’s female-led staff. I am excited to be working in an organization with so many successful women. I look forward to their wisdom about non-profit work and dedication to victims’ rights. 

2. What are some of your hobbies?

I love hiking and weekend backpacking trips. Swimming and reading keep me balanced. I grew up in Portland and love continuing to explore my city with friends and family. I walk everywhere – looking for spots of sun, street art, and hidden parks.

3. Who or what inspires you?

My teachers in Portland Public Schools inspire me, especially, Ms. Allers, Mr. Hunter, and Mr. Sorensen. Their dedication to community building and equity have improved school climate for countless students. I am the product of hardworking, persistent, and passionate teachers. My younger sister is my other inspiration. She is wise, smart, and strong. She is unconditionally caring and never fails to make me laugh til I cry.

4. What one thing has surprised you or have you learned about victims’ rights since you started your internship?

One thing that has surprised me was learning about the Modern Crime Victims’ Rights Movement in the 1970s to the late 1990s. This grassroots movement passed thousands of laws in less than 30 years and amended more than 30 state constitutions. The Modern Crime Victims’ Rights Movement is considered one of the most successful movements in the United States based on the amount of legislation passed. I was surprised that I had never heard about this movement before. I am interested in learning about the techniques they used to enact social change and in understanding their connection to the Civil Rights Movement and feminist movement during this time.