School navigation

Content tagged with "course-description"

News

  • April 9
    Adjunct Professor Steven Wise, JD
    2 credits
    June 30 - July 10, 2020
    Weekdays, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
    Zoom online format (more details coming)
  • March 16
    Adjunct Professor Paul Locke, JD, DrPH
    Distinguished Visiting Professor of Animal Law and Science

    2 credits
    July 20 - 31, 2020
    LiveChats online, weekdays, 3:30pm - 5:00pm PST
    entirely ONLINE
  • Professor Kathy Hessler
    January 13
    Professor Kathy Hessler
    2 credits
    June 16 - 26, 2020
    LiveChats online, weekdays, 1:30 - 3:00pm PDT
    entirely ONLINE
  • July 13
    Adjunct Professor Lora Dunn, JD
    2 credits
    Fall semester 2016
  • May 10
    2 credits
    CANCELED - 2016
  • March 30
    Stephan Otto
    4 credits
    *generally offered every spring
    *Limit: 4 students
  • June 10
    This course is for those students who wish to continue work in the Animal Law Clinic and have successfully completed the clinic, or for LL.M. students who have already had an equivalent experience. Permission of the instructor is required in addition to work on clinic cases and matters.
  • June 10
    This three-credit survey course provides an introduction to federal natural resources law, with an emphasis on living resources. In a mixed lecture and seminar format, we will examine the themes and theoretical conflicts that underlie natural resource management, as well as the special qualities of natural resource problems that render management efforts so difficult.
  • June 10
    This course explores legal schemes for securing and using water rights in surface water and groundwater for private and public uses in the United States. We will examine the riparian and prior appropriation doctrines of water allocation, groundwater management regimes, federal water management and regulation, and interstate and transboundary allocation devices. We will also consider the evolving role of science, economics, and policy in water allocation law. Evaluation will be based on an exam and in-class exercises and participation.
  • June 10
    This course examines legal mandates for protection and management of biological diversity. Beginning with a brief overview of the scientific aspects of species, ecosystems, and genetic resources, the course includes consideration of interplay between science and law throughout its survey of laws related to wildlife. Substantively, the class analyzes the property and constitutional underpinnings of state and federal wildlife laws, looks at examples and structures of state regulation of wildlife, and examines the special case of American Indians’ rights to, and control over, wildlife resources. The course also focuses on several federal statutory schemes, including the Lacey Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and laws and policies aimed at controlling invasive species. The course considers federal management of wildlife habitat under statutes such as the National Forest Management Act and National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act, and briefly covers international efforts to protect biodiversity. Due to the statute’s broad influence on the field, the class devotes particular attention to the federal Endangered Species Act.
  • June 10
    This course surveys the constitutional, statutory and common law governing the management of federal lands. It includes a review of the history of public land acquisition, disposition, and reservation, and also examines the authority of Congress, the executive, the judiciary, and the states over public lands which predominate in the western United States. The course examines laws related to the use of forest, range, mineral, water, wildlife, recreation and wilderness resources of the public lands as well as the application of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act to federal lands. Grades are based on a take-home examination and class participation.
  • June 10
    This seminar examines the complicated intersection between law and science in managing and protecting the environment. Using a variety of environmental and natural resources statutes as examples, it explores integration of law and science in setting regulatory standards; the process of making scientific determinations and resolving disputes involving science; and the challenges of implementing environmental regulations given scientific uncertainties, resource limitations, and political controversy. The seminar also examines specific statutes and topics such as the Data Quality Act; disputes involving science under the Federal Rules of Evidence, adaptive management, scientists as advocates, and science and law in the media.
  • June 10
    This course surveys numerous environmental, legal, and institution problems concerning the use and management of the Columbia Basin’s natural resources, including its valuable Pacific salmon runs. The course includes discussion of Indian treaty fishing rights, dam building and operations, and statutes such as the Northwest Power Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and the Magnuson-Stevens Act governing ocean fishing. The course will also examine the creation and management of the nation’s largest national scenic area in the Columbia River Gorge and the successful efforts to remove several dams to restore fish runs.
  • June 10
    Most legal systems in the world recognize private property rights: legal rights of an individual to use and exploit resources to the exclusion of others. In this 2-credit seminar, we will examine leading theoretical justifications for property rights. We will also examine how policy debates about property shape and influence legal debates in a variety of contexts, including regulatory takings, mass land redistribution, homelessness, wage labor, property in living beings, and the intersections between property law, tort law and contract law. The course will begin with a brief introduction to legal and political theory.
  • June 10
    This course examines the principal laws and institutions in the field of international environmental law. The course begins with a review of the fundamental underpinnings of environmental and international law, including the precautionary principle, polluter pays principle, state responsibility for environmental harm, and permanent sovereignty over natural resources. The course next examines issues of the global commons, such as ozone depletion, climate change, and depletion of ocean resources. It explores international treaties to protect biological diversity, including the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, the Convention on Biological Diversity, and the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. It also examines major pollution issues, such as hazardous waste trade. Throughout these discussions, we examine development issues, the polarization of issues as developed and developing country issues, and the role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in the development and enforcement of international environmental law. Grading is based on an examination.
  • June 10
    Public and private forest lands have long been one of our most treasured natural resources. Forests provide clean water and air, habitat for a diverse array of flora and fauna, recreational opportunities, wood fiber, and other products for human and non-human use. Decisions on how to prioritize among these amenities involve hotly debated scientific principles and often provoke a debate that can cause deep divisions among people. These issues play out at local, state, and national levels among an array of public, private, and governmental interests and entities.
  • June 10
    This class is offered as three credits in the Spring or as four credits in the Fall.
  • June 10

    This course examines the Environmental Justice movement and the disproportionate impacts borne by communities of color and low-income communities through the lens of Community, Law and Policy. Readings include select case law, law review excerpts, case studies and media, with a focus on the root causes of environmental injustice and federal, state and local policy initiatives and laws that both address and perpetuate these issues. We will examine applicable environmental and civil rights legislation for heir effectiveness in ameliorating disparate environmental health risks, as well as emerging policies and initiatives being advanced to fill the gaps in protection. Particular attention will be given to local environmental justice issues and the specific problems facing community residents, activists and advocates working to address these concerns.

  • June 10
    Global climate change has become one of the most significant environmental, economic, and societal challenges confronting the global community. This class will explore the legal, political, and scientific challenges involved in addressing and responding to climate change. The class will consider international strategies and laws, including the Kyoto Protocol, emissions trading schemes, and efforts to involve the developing world in climate change mitigation. The class will also focus on U.S. law and policy. Covered topics include regulation of greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act and other statutes, federal court jurisdiction to hear cases related to climate change, and state and local efforts to mitigate climate change.
  • June 10
    3 credits
    *generally offered every fall

    Required for Animal Law Certificate

  • June 10
    Kathy Hessler
    6 credits, full year
    *offered every year
    *Prerequisite - Animal Law Fundamentals 449
  • May 6
    3 credits
    *generally offered annually
  • May 6
    Adjunct Professor Paul Locke, JD, DrPH
    2 credits
    *now offered online only
  • May 6
    2 credits
    *generally offered in the summer
  • May 6
    2 credits
    *Usually offered in the summer
  • March 12
    Erica Lyman, JD
    2 credits
    *generally offered in the summer
  • November 13
    Russ Mead
    2 credits
    *generally taught every spring
  • November 13
    Kathryn Hall ‘03
    2 credits
  • November 13
    3 credits
    *Limit: 15 students
  • November 13
    2 credits
Share this story on