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Events

October 21st, 2020

  • The On Being Discussions with Isabel Wilkerson, Darnell Moore, Vincent Harding, and Imani Perry 5:00pm - 6:00pm: On Being Discussions on Race & Healing
    A weekly discussion group for students, staff, and faculty from all three campuses focusing on different On Being podcasts (onbeing.org) from primarily Black voices. Engage the topic of race and healing and work toward justice. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript beforehand, and then gather together around the virtual dinner table to discuss, connect, and act.


    Oct. 21: Isabel Wilkerson, “This History is Long, This History is Deep”

    “Go to the doctor and they won’t begin to treat you without taking your history — and not just yours, but that of your parents and grandparents before you. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson points this out as she reflects on her epic work of narrative nonfiction, The Warmth of Other Suns. She’s immersed herself in the stories of the Great Migration, the movement of six million African Americans to northern U.S. cities in the 20th century. The book is a carrier of histories and truths that help make sense of human and social challenges at the heart of our life together now.” - Krista Tippett


October 23rd, 2020

  • 3:30pm: “Essentializing Language and the Prospects for Ameliorative Projects” by Katherine Ritchie (University of California, Irvine)

    Some language encourages essentialist thinking. While philosophers have focused on essentialism and generic generalizations, I argue that nouns as a category are poised to refer to kinds and to promote representational essentializing. Our psychological propensity to essentialize when nouns are used reveals a limitation for ameliorative projects. Ameliorated nouns (and their conceptual correlates) can continue to underpin essentializing inferences. Given the way language and cognition function, ameliorative projects can fail to meet core anti-essentialist social and political ends by failing to consider the import of vehicles of representation. Yet, I argue, representational essentialism does not doom anti-essentialist ameliorative projects. Rather, would-be ameliorators ought to attend to the propensities for our representations to essentialize and to the complex relationship between essentialism and prejudice.

  • An image for Judaism and Sexuality, a talk and discussion co-sponsored by LC Hillel and Spiritual... 6:30pm - 8:00pm: Judaism and Sexuality Talk and Discussion
    Join student groups Spiritual Que(e)ry and LC Hillel in this discussion featuring Religious Studies Professor Robert Kugler. There will be a time for listening and a time for exploring the topic together.

    The Zoom link is at linktr.ee/LCHillel.

    If there are any accommodations you would like for the Zoom meeting, please let us know. Thanks!

October 28th, 2020

  • On Being Discussions featuring Darnell Moore, Vincent Harding, Imani Perry, and Desmond Tutu 5:00pm - 6:00pm: On Being Discussions on Race & Healing
    A weekly discussion group for students, staff, and faculty from all three campuses focusing on different On Being podcasts (onbeing.org) from primarily Black voices. Engage the topic of race and healing and work toward justice. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript beforehand, and then gather together around the virtual dinner table to discuss, connect, and act.


    Oct. 28: Darnell Moore, “Self-Reflection and Social Evolution”

    “Darnell Moore says honest, uncomfortable conversations are a sign of love — and that self-reflection goes hand-in-hand with culture shift and social evolution. A writer and activist, he’s grown wise through his work on successful and less successful civic initiatives, including Mark Zuckerberg’s plan to remake the schools of Newark, New Jersey, and he is a key figure in the ongoing, under-publicized, creative story of The Movement for Black Lives.” - Krista Tippett


November 4th, 2020

  • On Being Discussions featuring Darnell Moore, Vincent Harding, Imani Perry, and Desmond Tutu 5:00pm - 6:00pm: On Being Discussions on Race & Healing

    Gather for a special optional two-hour discussion for students, staff, and faculty from all three Lewis & Clark campuses. We will spend from 5-6pm the Wednesday evening after the election guided by the wisdom of the late Vincent Harding, who was the chairperson of the Veterans of Hope Project at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript beforehand, and then gather together around the virtual dinner table to discuss and connect. Harding said in the interview with Tippett, “How do we work together? How do we talk together in ways that will open up our best capacities and our best gifts? My own feeling that I try to share again and again, Krista, is that when it comes to creating a multiracial, multiethnic, multireligious, democratic society, we are still a developing nation.”

    Whoever wins the presidential election, Harding’s question calls out to us all in 2020: How do we work together? How do we talk together in ways that will open up our best capacities and our best gifts?

    For those who wish, we can continue the conversation for an additional hour. Stay for as little or as long as you like. 

    Nov. 4: Vincent Harding, “Is America Possible?”

    “Vincent Harding was wise about how the vision of the civil rights movement might speak to 21st-century realities. He reminded us that the movement of the ’50s and ’60s was spiritually as well as politically vigorous; it aspired to a “beloved community,” not merely a tolerant integrated society. He pursued this through patient-yet-passionate cross-cultural, cross-generational relationships. And he posed and lived a question that is freshly in our midst: Is America possible?” - Krista Tippett

    Facilitated by Hilary Martin Himan, Office of Spiritual Life




November 11th, 2020

  • On Being Discussions featuring Darnell Moore, Vincent Harding, Imani Perry, and Desmond Tutu 5:00pm - 6:00pm: On Being Discussions on Race & Healing
    A weekly discussion group for students, staff, and faculty from all three campuses focusing on different On Being podcasts (onbeing.org) from primarily Black voices. Engage the topic of race and healing and work toward justice. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript beforehand, and then gather together around the virtual dinner table to discuss and connect.


    Nov. 11: Imani Perry “More Beautiful”

    “James Baldwin said, “American history is longer, larger, more various, more beautiful, and more terrible than anything anyone has ever said about it.” Imani Perry embodies that prism. For the past few years, Perry has been pondering the notions of slow work and resistant joy as she writes about what it means to raise her two black sons — as a thinker and writer at the intersection of law, race, culture, and literature.” - Krista Tippett

November 18th, 2020

  • On Being Discussions featuring Darnell Moore, Vincent Harding, Imani Perry, and Desmond Tutu 5:00pm - 6:00pm: On Being Discussions on Race & Healing
    Join us for our final On Being Discussion of the fall term. On Being is a weekly discussion group for students, staff, and faculty from all three campuses focusing on different On Being podcasts (onbeing.org) from primarily Black voices. Engage the topic of race and healing and work toward justice. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript beforehand, and then gather together around the virtual dinner table to discuss and connect.


    Nov. 18, Desmond Tutu, “God of Surprises”

    “‘There’s no question about the reality of evil, of injustice, of suffering, but at the center of this existence is a heart beating with love.’

    South African Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu on how his understanding of God and humanity has unfolded through the history he’s lived and shaped.” - Tippett

November 19th, 2020

  • 5:30pm: Virtual Movie Screening of Emmy Award-Winning Film “Dawnland”
    Virtual Movie Screening of “Dawnland” via Zoom

    November 19th, 5:30 pm PST

    Presented by: Indian Law at Lewis & Clark Law School

    Sponsored by: Perkins Coie

    Q/A with Esther Anne, MSW, (Passamaquoddy from Sipayik) after the screening!
    Moderated by Dr. Carma Corcoran (Chippewa-Cree)

Files

Galleries

News

  • October 2
    ELC’s annual Swift Watch was a success! The board and several other students headed out to Portland and claimed the best spot on the hill to watch the flock of Swifts descend into a local chimney. No pictures accompany this story because we were all too in the moment to photograph.
  • September 27
    Tuse Mahenya BA ’21, an English major and political economy minor from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is organizing Lewis & Clark’s first TEDx event, “Deconstruct.” Scheduled for October 9, the event will give students a platform to share their ideas and hear from others about times their preconceived notions were challenged.
  • October 1

    Saturday, November 14, 2020 – 7:30pm

    Streamed Videos of Winning Plays Written by L&C Students

    Sponsored by L&C Journal of Dramatic Expression
    (Pause.)

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    The Theatre Department

  • September 6

    The Theatre Department in collaboration with the Music Department will present the 1998 version of Cabaret! Performances Nov 4, 5, 6 @7:30pm; Nov 7 @ 2:00pm.

    No Admission Charge.

  • September 4
    Performances: STREAMED Recordings of Dance Pieces!
    Thursday, Friday, Saturday, December 3, 4, 5 @ 7:30pm
  • August 20
    The Dance Program is looking for interested students to audition for our annual fall semester Dance Extravaganza!
  • April 24
    Diego Gutiérrez ’21, a second-year law student at Lewis & Clark Law School, is already making an impression on the legal community. In February, Gutiérrez was invited to speak at two events in Portland about his journey as an undocumented immigrant to becoming a law school student. On February 18, 2020, he was the only non-judge panelist at an event to honor Latinx Heroes and on February 21, 2020, he spoke at the Oregon Hispanic Bar Association’s annual dinner
  • Hope Smothers is on the right facing another person on the left, whose back is to the camera. The...
    April 23
    Hope Smothers is the recipient of this year’s Outstanding Undergraduate Student Award, given to an continuing student (non-senior) who has excelled at leadership and service this year.
  • March 12
    The Lewis & Clark Law School Public Interest Law Project (PILP) auction on February 22, 2020, raised the most money since 2013. Over 200 people attended, which was also a significant increase from prior years. The additional funds raised will allow PILP to provide more summer awards to students who have an unpaid public interest internship.
  • February 11
    Lewis & Clark’s Center for Business Law and Innovation and the International Law Program are holding a half-day symposium titled Importing and Exporting Amid a Trade War: Tariffs, Export Control, and Sanctions. The event will be held at the Lewis and Clark Campus on March 6, 2020 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., with a reception following.
  • July 28

    Tues, Sept 4, 5:00pm

    FIR ACRES THEATRE Main Stage

  • April 6
    Agnes Flanagan Chapel
  • January 22
    For 5 days, 30 Lewis & Clark students joined faculty and mentors to learn about entrepreneurship from the ground up, connecting their liberal arts training with tools for identifying problems and developing solutions. The driving philosophy behind Lewis & Clark’s Winterim experience? Leadership and entrepreneurship are lifelong mindsets.
  • Christopher Berry Speaks to LC SALDF
    November 9
    On Thursday, November 9th, 2017 the Lewis & Clark Law Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (LC SALDF) chapter hosted Christopher Berry, a staff attorney with the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) for one of its Speaker Series Events.
  • October 16
    This year’s symposium, Environmental Engagement in Tough Times, will take on pressing environmental issues with an emphasis on their social dimensions, like sustainable housing and equitable city growth. The three-day event kicks off with a keynote panel in Portland’s Pearl District on October 24.
  • October 5
    Black Box
  • April 19
    Theatre Senior Thesis Festival is the creative culmination of our Majors’ work in the Theatre Department. Audiences can expect a thrilling mix of performance, readings, presentations and more…
  • March 3

    Written By Anne Carson
    Directed by
     Rebecca Lingafelter
    Performances:
    March 3, 4, and 9, 10, & 11 at 7:30pm
                        
          March 5, 2pm matinee
    Auditions: January 18 & 19

  • February 17
    Lewis & Clark’s third annual student-run Middle Eastern Studies Symposium explores how cultural identity interacts with religion, gender, and resistance. Beginning Monday, February 20, and running through Wednesday, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • February 11

    Fresh new short plays written, directed and acted by students on a theme TBA.
    Performed ONE NIGHT ONLY: Saturday, February 11 at 10pm

  • September 1
    Performances: September 29, 30 & October 1 at 7:30pm
                             

  • April 19

    The annual Festival of Scholars showcases student research, art, and performance. 

  • February 24
    Gender is a lot of things: complex, fluid, and sometimes confusing. But fun? Lewis & Clark College’s 35th Annual Gender Studies Symposium, titled “Game On! Gender and Sexuality in Play,” will explore how the concept of fun and games relates to individual experiences of identity.
  • January 11
    Events at Lewis & Clark examine contemporary and historical issues.
  • Much Ado About Nothing
    October 30
    Written By William Shakespeare
    Directed by Associate Professor Stephen Weeks
    Performances: Oct. 28, 29 & Nov. 3,4, & 5 at 7:30pm and Oct 30, 2:00pm Matinee
    Auditions: August 30, 31

  • October 1
    Lewis & Clark’s 18th annual Environmental Affairs Symposium this year runs from October 20-22, and is free and open to the public. The student-organized symposium will explore how environmentalism and sustainability can be promoted in all fields of study with this year’s theme Environment Across Boundaries.
  • October 1
    Fresh new short plays written, directed and acted by students on the theme TBA.
    Performed ONE NIGHT ONLY: Saturday, October 17 at 10pm
  • June 11

    A new annual event showcases student research, performance, and art.

  • March 6

    By Eugene Ionesco
    Performances: March 6, 7, 12, 13, & 14 at 7:30pm


    Auditions: January 21, 22, & 23

  • February 14
    Fresh new short plays written, directed and acted by students on a theme TO BE ANNOUNCED
    Performed ONE NIGHT ONLY: Saturday, February 14 at 10pm
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