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Law Courses Catalog

Juvenile Justice

  • Typically offered every other year

NOTE: This course description is new for the 2017-2018 academic year. You may read the prior course description immediately below the new one. 

2017-2018

Limit: 15 students

Description: This course will explore current issues relating to two groups of children: those who may be in need of protection and those who come into conflict with the criminal law. Matters considered will include: the history of juvenile justice, the goal(s) of juvenile justice; the demographics of child protection and juvenile offending; the intersection of child protection and juvenile offending; international standards; process and disposals; national standards; and different models operating within the U.S. and elsewhere. What rights do - and should - children and young people have within the child protection and criminal justice systems? Do attempts to protect them show due regard for their rights? Should children and young people be treated differently to adults, in the context of crime? If so, when and why? If not, why not? If young offenders are treated differently, does this enhance or diminish their rights? To what extent does the legal system acknowledge and accommodate diversity in this context? What other interest merit consideration? How can the various interests be reconciled? How do existing models fare, in the light of these questions?

This course will be taught by way of weekly, two-hour seminars with an emphasis on participation. Evaluation is by a paper on a topic of the student’s choice, subject to approval, with the submission date for all papers being December 8, 2017. In addition, each student will be required to lead (or co-lead) one seminar discussion. Subject to selecting a suitable topic, students may use their papers to satisfy the Capstone or WIE writing requirements provided an outline of the paper has been submitted by October 6 and a draft by November 3.

With professor permission meets the Capstone or WIE writing Requirements.

NOTE: The below course description applied in academic years prior to 2017-2018.

Limit: 15 students

Description: This seminar will explore current issues relating to two groups of children: those who may be in need of protection and those who come into conflict with the criminal law. Matters considered will include: the history of juvenile justice, the goal(s) of juvenile justice; the demographics of child protection and juvenile offending; the intersection of child protection and juvenile offending; international standards; process and disposals; national standards; and different models operating within the U.S. and elsewhere. Questions explored will include what rights do and should juveniles have within the child protection and criminal justice systems? Do attempts to protect children show due regard for their rights? Should children and young people be treated differently to adults, in the context of crime? If so, when and why? If not, why not? If young offenders are treated differently, does this enhance or diminish their rights? What other interest merit consideration? How can the various interests be reconciled? How do existing models fare, in the light of these questions?

Evaluation is by a paper on a topic of the student’s choice, subject to approval, with the submission date for all papers being December 7, 2015. In addition, each student will be required to lead (or co-lead) one seminar discussion. Subject to selecting a suitable topic, students may use their papers to satisfy the Capstone or WIE writing requirements provided an outline of the paper has been submitted by October 2 and a draft by November 6.

With professor permission meets the Capstone or WIE writing Requirements.