Events

Alumni Presentations

At alumni events in March and April, Professor Tung Yin and Professor Aliza Kaplan, director of the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic, discussed their research. Yin spoke about the similarities between the Malheur occupation and the January attack on the U.S. Capitol. Kaplan discussed nonunanimous juries in Oregon and the then-upcoming U.S. Supreme Court decision on Edwards v. Vannoy, which concerns retroactivity.

  • Professor Tung Yin Professor Tung Yin
  • Professor Aliza Kaplan, director of the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic Professor Aliza Kaplan, director of the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic

Justice, Race, and Reform: Examining Proposals for Responsive Change

The Lewis & Clark Law Review (LCLR) hosted a symposium in April to answer questions about what we can learn from past reform attempts and to propose paths forward. The symposium featured the scholars who published in Issue 25.2, including LCLR Editor Connor McDermott ’21; Lewis & Clark professors Meg Garvin, Aliza Kaplan, Jim Oleske, and Tung Yin; and scholars from Harvard, Pritzker, and the University of New Mexico.

“Nationwide protests highlighted the need for criminal justice reform that is sensitive to systemic inequality,” noted LCLR. “However, the push for reform has been met with resistance, a clash that played out dramatically in our native Portland, Oregon, last summer. Furthermore, rather than dampen the calls for justice, the current pandemic has served to highlight the very real urgency of criminal justice reform.” In his introduction to the issue, Yin wrote, “The time is now for meaningful criminal justice reform. The symposium/Law Review aims to provoke a widespread consideration of ways in which such reform might proceed.”

Improving Criminal Justice

Crime Victim Litigation Clinic

Students with the Crime Victim Litigation Clinic (CVLC), which is a key project of the National Crime Victim Litigation Institute (NCVLI), work on litigation and policy issues impacting victims of crime all across the country.

Criminal Justice Reform Clinic

Students in the Criminal Justice Reform Clinic (CJRC) worked on a variety of cases and projects relating to the back end of the criminal justice system in the areas of parole, clemency, forensic science in wrongful convictions, and legal services to incarcerated youth.