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Legal Reentry Resources

Obtain Critical Documents

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    Identification in General

    What can I do pre-release?

    Gathering identification documents prior to your release will allow you to immediately apply for housing, public benefits, employment opportunities and more. If you can leave prison with your important forms of identification in hand, you will be able to immediately access resources, without having to travel to various government offices and wait for the various government agencies to send you the information, or documents, that you need.

    Additionally, if you complete this process while in custody of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), the DOC will pay the costs associated with obtaining your identification. This means that you would not have to pay any costs related to securing your identification.

    Depending on the form of identification you are hoping to secure, the facility you are in will be able to provide you with the required application and will either submit it on your behalf, or instruct you on how to submit the application yourself. If it is necessary to transport you to a certain office or agency to complete the application process, the facility you are in will organize the trip. It’s important to be aware that you may be placed on a wait list or required to wait until enough other individuals are ready to make the trip as well.

    To make sure that you can complete the application process before your release date, it is best to start filling out applications and getting on potential wait lists as early in your sentence as you are able! Once your application materials are processed, the agency will send the form of identification to your facility and it will be given to you upon your release.

    The earlier you start this process, the better! While DOC policy states that, upon release, every individual will leave with their birth certificate, social security card and other necessary identification documents in hand, it is up to you to make sure that this happens. Transitional leave, or other programs that change your anticipated release date, make it difficult for DOC to keep track of when you will need these documents. Ultimately, it is your responsibility to ask questions and seek out the necessary information.

    Keep reading for more information on obtaining identification.
    What are the various forms of Identification and why do I need them?

    Forms of identification help to establish who you are by providing important personal information such as your photograph, physical features, birth information and address. There are many ways to prove your identity, and different organizations will request different identifying items to confirm who you are. Examples of identity documents include records such as your birth certificate, Social Security card, state-issued driver’s license or identification card, passport book or passport card, tribal identification, library cards, and more.

    It is important to keep in mind that some forms of identification are more important than others. For example, your birth certificate is essential to obtaining other critical forms of identification, so it is a great place to start.

    Where do I start?

    As mentioned above, some identifying documents are more critical than others and, to obtain certain identifying documents, you will be required to present others. Here is an example priority list when deciding which identifying documents to obtain first:

    1. Birth Certificate or Certificate of Naturalization*
    2. Social Security Card*
    3. State-Issued Driver’s License or Identification Card*
    4. Passport
    5. Tribal ID Card
    6. Library Card
    7. Voter Registration
    8. Selective Service Registration

    * It is possible to secure this document while still incarcerated.

    General Tips
    • Because access to many of the resources that are available to you is dependent on your ability to present at least one valid form of identification, it is crucial that you start obtaining identifying documents as soon as possible.
    • Be sure to use the name on your birth certificate when applying for various forms of identification. This is your legal name and, as such, it is your legal identity.
    • Securing some forms of identification will cost money. In some circumstances, it is possible to obtain a waiver or have your fee reduced based on income. Contact the appropriate office or agency for more information.

    Birth Certificate

    What is a birth certificate and why do I need it?

    A birth certificate is a legal record that documents a person’s name, gender, date of birth, place of birth and parentage. You will be required to show a certified copy of your birth certificate to obtain various forms of identification and when applying for government benefits or enrolling in school.

    How do I obtain my birth certificate?
    • Contact the Vital Records Office in the county in which you were born. Click on the link for a directory of Vital Records Offices (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/w2w/index.htm).
    • Be prepared to pay between $5.00 - $50.00 for a copy. The fee is dependent on where you were born and the method of delivery you request.
    • Be prepared to present verification of identity. Requirements will vary depending on the state, so be sure to check with the particular Vital Records Office for information on what documents would constitute proper verification of identity. Acceptable documentation may be one, or a combination, of the following:
      • State driver’s license or ID card
      • Current, valid U.S. Passport
      • Student/School ID card
      • Armed Services ID card
      • U.S. Immigration or naturalization papers
      • Life insurance policy
      • Health insurance card
      • Valid food stamp, welfare, or unemployment identification
      • Recent utility or other bill with current address
      • Official papers issued by courts of record that include date of birth
      • Official corrections department or parole papers showing date of birth and identity
      • Tax statements
    Original Birth Certificate vs. Certified Copy vs. Informational Copy

    At the time of your birth, the hospital sends the official, original copy of your birth record to the designated vital records agency office in the area of your birth. This original copy remains at the vital records agency office and is used to create certified, or official copies for your use. The certified, or official copy of your birth certificate is what will be required to prove your identity and age.

    There are two main differences between a certified copy of your birth certificate and an informational copy of your birth certificate. First, the certified copy contains a seal that proves the document is government-issued. Second, the certified copy will be notarized, further verifying the document’s validity. An informational copy of your birth certificate is not a legal document that will establish your identity.

    What do I do if I was adopted and I don’t know where I was born?

    If you were adopted, request a certified copy of your birth certificate (see steps above in How do I obtain my birth certificate?) in the state in which you were adopted.

    What do I do if I’m already a naturalized citizen, but I have lost my Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship?

    If you have already applied for and obtained your Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship but need a replacement, you must:

    • Complete an Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document, also known as a Form N-565. Be aware that the form will be rejected if information is missing from Parts 1 or 2, and be sure to sign the form in Part 9.
    • Include the filing fee of $555 with your application.
    • If you live in Oregon, mail your application to:
      DHS/USCIS
      Nebraska Service Center
      PO Box 87565
      Lincoln, NE 68501-7565

    For additional information, see Instructions for Application for Replacement Naturalization/Citizenship Document at https://www.uscis.gov/n-565.

    What do I do if I was born to U.S. Citizen parent(s) in another Country?

    To obtain proof of your birth abroad, you will need to contact the Bureau of Consular Affairs. If your parents reported your birth abroad to the U.S. Department of State in a timely manner, they likely applied for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) at the same time, which is also referred to as a FS-240. A CRBA is considered proof of U.S. Citizenship. If your parents did not report your birth in a timely manner to the U.S. Department of State and you are under the age of 18, you can apply for a CRBA yourself.

    Visit the U.S. Department of State’s website for information on how to replace, amend or request copies of a CRBA (https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/abroad/events-and-records/birth.html).

    If your parents did not report your birth in a timely manner to the U.S. Department of State and you are over the age of 18, you can apply for a Certificate of Citizenship, also referred to as Naturalization. To apply for citizenship, or naturalization, you will need to file an Application for Naturalization, also referred to as a Form N-400 (https://www.uscis.gov/n-400).

    See following section for more information on applying for naturalization.

    What do I do if I was born in another country and I’m not a U.S. citizen or my birth abroad was not reported?

    If you are over the age of 18, were born in another country and are not a U.S. citizen, you can apply for citizenship, or naturalization, by filing an Application for Naturalization, which is also referred to as a Form N-400 (https://www.uscis.gov/n-400). To apply for naturalization, you must:

    • Be 18 years or older
    • Be a lawful, permanent resident (have a “green card”)
    • Demonstrate continuous permanent residence in the U.S. for at least 5 years (If you are married to a U.S. citizen, 3 years may suffice)
    • Demonstrate that you have been physically present i the U.S. for at least 30 months (If you are married to a U.S. citizen, 18 months may suffice)
    • Demonstrate that you have lived in the state in which you are claiming residence for at least 3 months
    • Demonstrate good moral character
    • Demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution
    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of U.S. history and government, as well as an ability to read, write, speak and understand basic English
    • Take an Oath of Allegiance to the U.S.

    You will be asked to provide additional certified copies of documents pertaining to any legal name change or arrest. Regarding arrests, you will be required to provide documents that show the outcome in any arrest, detention or probation.

    If you are a man between the ages of 18 and 26, you will be required to show proof that you have registered for the Selective Service (see Selective Service for more information).

    If you have additional questions, see https://www.uscis.gov/n-400 for more information on applying for naturalization, or contact the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Customer Service Center at 800-375-5283.

    Social Security

    What is a Social Security number?

    If you were both born in the U.S. and your birth was reported, the government assigns you a Social Security number (SSN) at the time of your birth. Your SSN is a 9-digit number that is linked to your specific identity and is required to get a job and obtain certain government services. Many non-government services, such as banks, hospitals and schools, will also request your SSN to access their services.

    What is your Social Security card?

    Your Social Security card is an official document that can be used to verify your identity to both government and non-government organizations. It is essentially your SSN on formal paper.

    There are three types of Social Security cards:
    1. Shows your name, Social Security number and allows you to work without any restrictions. These cards are issued to:
      • U.S. Citizens
      • People lawfully admitted to the U.S. on a permanent basis
    2. Shows your name and Social Security number with notes, “VALID FOR WORK ONLY WITH DHS AUTHORIZATION.” These cards are issued to:
      • People lawfully admitted to the U.S. on a temporary basis who have DHS authorization to work
    3. Shows your name and Social Security number with notes, “NOT VALID FOR EMPLOYMENT.” These cards are issued to people from other countries who:
      • Are lawfully admitted to the U.S. without work authorization from DHS, but have a valid non-work reason for needing a Social Security number
      • Need a number because of a federal law requiring a Social Security number to get a benefit or service
    Why do I need to know my Social Security number?

    Most often, you will be required to provide your 9-digit SSN. You will be asked to show your actual Social Security card in limited situations. Therefore, it is in your benefit to memorize your SSN so that you can store your card in a safe place and only access it when required to. See “How to Protect my Social Security Number.”

    I don’t think I ever got a SSN, how do I get one now?

    See “How to Obtain your Social Security Card or Number” below and follow the checklist to apply for a Social Security number and card.

    I don’t know where my Social Security card is, how do I get a replacement?

    See “How to Obtain your Social Security Card or Number” below and follow the checklist to apply for a Social Security number and card.

    I see that I can apply in person or by mail, which is better?

    There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. In certain situations, it may be that applying by mail is the best (or only) option available to you. At the end of the day, you should do what works best for you. That said, when possible, it is strongly recommended that you apply in person. If you apply in person, the Social Security agent will be able to meet you, which may work to your advantage as you go through the application process. When applying by mail, you will be required to send original identifying documents to the local Social Security office, which means that you, yourself, will not have access to those documents until the office returns them to you. In addition, applying in person means that you will be able to leave the office with a SSN on the same day (a card will be mailed to you). These are just a few things to consider when you are making your decision whether to apply for your Social Security number or card in person or by mail.

    How to Obtain your Social Security Number of Card?

    To apply for an original or replacement Social Security card or make changes to information on your Social Security record:

    1. Complete an application for a Social Security card, Form SS-5 (https://www.ssa.gov/forms/ss-5.pdf)
      • If printing the application, use only 8 ½ X 11 paper
      • Be sure to print legibly using only black or blue ink
    2. Take (or mail) completed SS-5 form to nearest Social Security office
      • Any documents that are mailed along with your application will be returned to you by the Social Security office
      • See “Contact Social Security” below to find a location in your area
    3. Present evidence of U.S. citizenship by providing one of the following items:
      • U.S. Birth Certificate
      • U.S. Passport
      • Certificate of Citizenship
      • Certificate of Naturalization
      • If not a U.S. Citizen, acceptable documents include: Permanent Resident Card, Arrival/Departure Record with an unexpired foreign passport, or an Employment Authorization Card (For more information, call a Social Security office near you - see “How to find a Social Security Office near you”).
    4. Present evidence of age by providing one of the following items:
      • If U.S. born:
        • U.S. Birth Certificate
        • U.S. hospital record of your birth
        • Passport
        • Religious record established before the age of 5 showing age or date of birth
        • U.S. hospital record of your birth
      • If foreign born:
        • Foreign Birth Certificate
        • Foreign Passport
        • I-551 Permanent Residence Card
        • I-94 Arrival/Departure Record
    5. Present evidence of identity by providing one of the following items:
      Document must be current (not expired) and show your name, identifying information, and preferably a recent photograph
      • State driver’s license or ID
      • U.S. Passport
      • Marriage or divorce record
      • U.S. military ID card
      • Student/School ID card
      • Life insurance policy
      • Health insurance card
      • Certified copy of medical record (clinic, doctor or hospital)
     Additional Information:
    • All documents must be either originals or copies certified by the issuing agency
    • The Social Security office can use one document for two purposes. For example, if you have a U.S. Passport, it can be used to satisfy proof of U.S. Citizenship and age. However, you must provide at least two separate documents
    • You are limited to 3 replacement cards in a year and 10 replacement cards during a lifetime (legal name changes do not count toward these limits)
    I don’t know where my Social Security card is, how do I get a replacement?
    • Complete an SS-5 application for a Social Security card
    • Present an unexpired original document with identifying information and (preferably) a recent photograph that proves your identity
    • If you were born outside of the United States and didn’t show proof of citizenship when you got your card, show evidence of your U.S Citizenship
    • If you are not a U.S. citizen, show evidence of your current lawful noncitizen status
    What do I do if my name has changed?
    • Present a document that proves your legal name change
      • Marriage Document
      • Divorce Decree
      • Certificate of Naturalization showing a new name
      • Court order for a name change
    If your name was changed more than 2 years ago (or 4 years if you are younger than the age 18):
    • Present a document that proves your legal name change
      • Marriage Document
      • Divorce Decree
      • Certificate of Naturalization showing a new name
      • Court order for a name change
    • Present an identity document in your old name (can be expired)
    What do I do if my immigration status or citizenship has changed?
    • Present a document that proves your new status or citizenship
    • U.S. Passport
    • Certificate of Naturalization
    • Certificate of Citizenship

    * If you are not a U.S. Citizen, the Social Security office will ask to see your current immigration documents

    Tips on Protecting your Social Security Number and Card
    1. Avoid giving out your Social Security information unnecessarily
    2. If possible, memorize your Social Security number
    3. Keep your Social Security information in a safe place that only you can access
    4. Do not carry it with you unless absolutely necessary
    5. Refrain from disclosing your full Social Security number over the phone
    6. When asked to disclose your Social Security information, ask: 1) Why the number is needed?, 2) How the information will be used?, and 3) What will happen if you refuse to disclose the information?
    Have more questions? Contact Social Security directly:

    Phone:
      Toll-Free: 1-800-772-1213
      Toll-Free TTY (if deaf or hard of hearing): 1-800-325-0778
    * Automated services available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. If you need to speak to a person, calls will be answered Monday - Friday from 7am - 7pm.

    Website: www.ssa.gov

    Visit a Social Security office: Use the Social Security Administration’s Office Locator (https://secure.ssa.gov/ICON/main.jsp) to find a location in your area

    State-Issued Identification

    Comparing forms of State Identification
    Oregon State ID
    Oregon Driver License

    Government-issued ID; can be used to prove age, identity, and legal presence

    Government-issued ID; can be used to prove age, identity, and legal presence

    May be obtained while incarcerated

    Not obtainable while incarcerated - you must apply in person upon release

    Requires only your Birth Certificate and Social Security number

    Requires your Birth Certificate, Social Security number and you must take and pass both a written and a driving test

    Does not authorize you to drive a car

    Authorizes you to drive a car

    No restrictions based on criminal history (you can get an identification card no matter what your record looks like)

    Some restrictions depending on your criminal history

    *Heavily adapted from Roadmap to Reentry: A California Legal Guide

    State Identification Card
    What is an Identification (ID) Card and what can you do with it?

    Oregon DMV Offices issue non-driver ID cards to people of all ages who are a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon as long as you do not have a valid ID card from another state. Oregon ID cards are for identification purposes only and are valid for 8 years.

    How do I obtain my Oregon ID Card for the first time?

    What You Will Need:

    1. One document to prove your full legal name: (You must provide additional documentation proving your current full legal name if it is different than the name shown on your proof of legal presence)
      • Official, government-issued marriage certificate or license
      • A U.S. city, county or state court-issued divorce decree, judgment of dissolution of marriage, annulment of marriage decree, judgment of dissolution of domestic partnership, or annulment of domestic partnership
      • A U.S. city, county or state court-issued adoption decree, legal name change decree, custody decree or guardianship decree
      • Oregon Driver License, Instruction Permit or ID Card
      • Canadian government issued birth certificate
      • U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad
      • Valid U.S. Passport, Passport Card, Emergency Passport or Territorial Passport
    2. One document to prove your legal presence, identity and date of birth:
      • U.S. Government-issued birth document (cannot be laminated and must be an original or certified copy)
      • U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad
      • Valid U.S. Passport, Passport Card, Emergency Passport or Territorial Passport
    3. Social Security Number
      • See “How to Obtain Your Social Security Number” above
    4. Proof of your residence address
      • You will only be asked to present proof of your residence address if this is your first time applying for an Oregon driving or identification card or if your address has changed since the last time you renewed or replaced your card
      • Proof of residence can be established by any document the DMV accepts as proof of your legal presence or identity. Other acceptable documents include:
        • Unexpired interim or temporary Oregon identification card
        • Oregon vehicle title or registration card
        • Utility statement issued by the service provider
        • Any document issued by a financial institution that includes your residence address (such as bank or loan statement)
        • Any item delivered by the United States Postal Service, FedEx or UPS (sent by a verifiable business or government agency)
        • Any document issued by an insurance company or agent
        • Paycheck, paystub, W-2 or 1099 tax form
        • Oregon voter notification card or voter profile report
        • Selective Service card
        • Medical or health benefits card
        • Unexpired professional license issued by an agency in the U.S.
      • If you are homeless, you can use a descriptive address, but you must also provide a mailing address and proof that you are a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon and complete a Certification of Oregon Residency or Domicile form (Form 735-7182 at http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/7182fill.pdf).
    5. Mailing Address
      • Because your identification card is mailed to you, you must be able to provide an address when you can receive your mail.
    6. Payment for fees
      • The current fee for an original identification card is $44.50.
      • The current fee to renew an identification card is $40.50
      • The current fee to replace an identification card is $39.50

    How to Apply:

    1. Visit DMV Office near you (visit the DMV’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/odot/dmv/pages/offices/index.aspx to find an office in your area)
    2. Complete the application, Form 735-173 (http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/173fill.pdf)
    3. Present proof of
    4. Full legal name
    5. Legal Presence in the U.S., Identity and Date of Birth
    6. Residence Address
    7. Provide Social Security Number
    8. Be prepared to pay the associated fee
    9. Surrender any valid Identification card issued by Oregon or another state or U.S. territory
    How do I renew or replace my Oregon ID Card?

    The requirements to renew and replace an Oregon Identification Card are the same as the requirements to apply for an Oregon ID Card for the very first time (see above). The only difference is the associated fee. To renew your Oregon ID card, you must include a payment of $40.50 along with your application materials. To replace your Oregon ID Card, you must include a payment of $39.50.

    Oregon Driver’s License
    What is an Oregon Driver’s License (ODL) and why do I need it?

    An ODL is a government-issued ID that authorizes you to drive a car. An ODL can be used to prove your age, identity and your legal presence.  

    How do I obtain my ODL for the first time?

    What you will need:

    1. One document to prove your full legal name: (You must provide additional documentation proving your current full legal name if it is different than the name shown on your proof of legal presence)
      • Official, government-issued marriage certificate or license
      • A U.S. city, county or state court-issued divorce decree, judgment of dissolution of marriage, annulment of marriage decree, judgment of dissolution of domestic partnership, or annulment of domestic partnership
      • A U.S. city, county or state court-issued adoption decree, legal name change decree, custody decree or guardianship decree
      • Oregon Driver License, Instruction Permit or ID Card
      • Canadian government issued birth certificate
      • U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad
      • Valid U.S. Passport, Passport Card, Emergency Passport or Territorial Passport
    2. One document to prove your legal presence, identity and date of birth:
      • U.S. Government-issued birth document (cannot be laminated and must be an original or certified copy)
      • U.S. Consular Report of Birth Abroad
      • Valid U.S. Passport, Passport Card, Emergency Passport or Territorial Passport
    3. Social Security Number
      • See “How to Obtain Your Social Security Number” above
    4. Proof of your residence address
      • You will only be asked to present proof of your residence address if this is your first time applying for an Oregon driving or identification card or if your address has changed since the last time you renewed or replaced your card
      • Proof of residence can be established by any document the DMV accepts as proof of your legal presence or identity. Other acceptable documents include:
        • Unexpired interim or temporary Oregon identification card
        • Oregon vehicle title or registration card
        • Utility statement issued by the service provider
        • Any document issued by a financial institution that includes your residence address (such as bank or loan statement)
        • Any item delivered by the United States Postal Service, FedEx or UPS (sent by a verifiable business or government agency)
        • Any document issued by an insurance company or agent
        • Paycheck, paystub, W-2, or 1099 tax form
        • Oregon voter notification card or voter profile report
        • Selective Service card
        • Medical or health benefits card
        • Unexpired professional license issued by an agency in the U.S.
      • If you are homeless, you can use a descriptive address, but you must also provide a mailing address and proof that you are a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon and complete a Certification of Oregon Residency or Domicile, Form 735-7182 at http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/7182fill.pdf)
    5. Mailing Address
      • Because your identification card is mailed to you, you must be able to provide an address when you can receive your mail
    6. Payment for fees
      • Original Driver License - Class C Application: $60
      • Drive Test - Class C Driver License: $9
      • Knowledge Test - Class C Driver License: $5
      • Oregon Driver License - Class C Renewal: $40
      • Oregon Driver License - Class C Replacement: $26.50

    How to apply if you are under 18:

    1. Visit DMV Office near you (visit the DMV’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/odot/dmv/pages/offices/index.aspx to find an office in your area)
    2. Be a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon
    3. Be able to show that you have had a valid instruction permit for at least 6 months
    4. Complete the required minimum hours of supervised driving experience (must be done with a licensed driver who is at least 21 years old and has had their license for at least 3 years)
      • If you have gone through an ODOT-approved traffic safety education course, you will be required to have 50 hours of supervised driving experience
      • If you have not gone through an ODOT-approved traffic safety education course, you will be required to have 100 hours of supervised driving experience
    5. Submit a completed application, Form 735-173 (http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/173fill.pdf)
    6. Provide parental consent
      • If you are under 18 years of age, your parent or legal guardian must sign your application to obtain a driving privilege.
    7. Provide proof of school enrollment
      • If you are under 18 years of age, your parent or legal guardian must certify that you are either in school or exempt from school attendance. This is only required the first time you obtain a driving privilege
    8. Present proof of your full legal name, your legal Presence in the U.S., Identity and Date of Birth, and your address (see “What you will need” above)
    9. Provide Social Security Number
    10. Pass a vision screening test
    11. Pass the Oregon knowledge test
      • Only required if you do not have a valid Oregon Instruction Permit that is valid or expired less than one year
    12. Pass a Safe Driving Practices knowledge test
    13. Schedule and pass the drive test
      • Must be able to provide proof of insurance for the vehicle at the time of the drive test
      • Contact your local DMV Office to schedule your test (see “DMV Locations” to find an office in your area)
    14. Be prepared to pay the associated fee(s)
    15. Surrender any valid Identification card issued by Oregon or another state or U.S. territory

    How to apply if you are over 18:

    1. Visit DMV Office near you (visit the DMV’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/odot/dmv/pages/offices/index.aspx to find an office in your area)
    2. Be a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon
    3. Submit a completed application, Form 735-173 (http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/173fill.pdf)
    4. Present proof of your full legal name, your legal Presence in the U.S., Identity and Date of Birth, and your address (see “What you will need” above)
    5. Provide Social Security Number
    6. Pass a vision screening test
    7. Pass the Oregon knowledge test
      • Only required if you do not have a valid Oregon Instruction Permit that is valid or expired less than one year
    8. Pass a Safe Driving Practices knowledge test
    9. Schedule and pass the drive test
      • Must be able to provide proof of insurance for the vehicle at the time of the drive test
      • Contact your local DMV Office to schedule your test (see “DMV Locations” to find an office in your area)
    10. Be prepared to pay the associated fee(s)
    11. Surrender any valid Identification card issued by Oregon or another state or U.S. territory
    How to renew your ODL?
    1. Visit DMV Office near you (See “DMV Locations” to find an office in your area)
    2. Be a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon
    3. Submit a completed application, Form 735-173 (http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/173fill.pdf)
    4. Present proof of your full legal name, your legal Presence in the U.S., Identity and Date of Birth, and your address (see “What you will need” above)
    5. Provide Social Security number
    6. Pass a vision screening test
    7. Be prepared to pay the associated fee(s)
    8. Surrender your previous ODL
    How to replace your ODL?
    1. Visit DMV Office near you (See “DMV Locations” to find an office in your area)
    2. Be a resident of, or domiciled in, Oregon
    3. Submit a completed application, Form 735-173 (http://www.odot.state.or.us/forms/dmv/173fill.pdf)
    4. Present proof of your full legal name, your legal Presence in the U.S., Identity and Date of Birth, and your address (see “What you will need” above)
    5. Provide Social Security Number
    6. Be prepared to pay the associated fee(s)
    7. Surrender your previous ODL (if you have it)
    What do I do when my ODL has been suspended or revoked?

    If your driving privileges have been suspended or revoked, a notice of the suspension or revocation will be sent to your address. During the period of suspension or revocation, you may not operate a motor vehicle.

    To recover your driving privileges, there are certain requirements that must be met and you will be required to pay a reinstatement fee. In some circumstances, you will be required to wait until a certain period of time lapses. In other circumstances, you will be able to act to shorten the time of the suspension or revocation. Your reinstatement options are dependent on the type of suspension or revocation. Each suspension or revocation has a code that matches each offense. Use the suspension or revocation code to determine what possible steps can be taken.

    For more information, see: https://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/DMV/Pages/notices/notification_info.aspx or call your local DMV Office (visit the DMV’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/odot/dmv/pages/offices/index.aspx to find an office in your area).

     

    U.S. Passport

    What is it and why do I need it?

    A U.S. Passport is an official document that  provides proof of identity, age and citizenship. A valid U.S. Passport also allows you to travel to and from foreign countries. Because obtaining a U.S. Passport can take up to 6 weeks (unless you pay a fee to get it sooner), consider applying for a Passport before you know you’re going to need it. Your Passport can be a convenient way to prove your identity and is a good thing to have on hand if possible.

    Who is eligible?

    To obtain your Passport, you must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. National and you must provide your SSN, proof of citizenship and proof of identity (see below for a list of acceptable documents). You will be prohibited from obtaining a U.S. Passport if you are currently incarcerated, on probation or on parole for any federal or state drug felony (or, in some circumstances, misdemeanor)  if you used your passport or crossed an international border while committing the offense. Other limiting factors are if you are forbidden from leaving the country pursuant to a court order or sentence condition, if you have any state or federal warrants out for your arrest, if you have a conviction for sex drug trafficking or if you owe $2,500 or more in child support. For more information on eligibility, contact:

    The National Passport Information Center
    1-877-487-2778
    TDD/TTY: 1-888-874-7793
    Email: NPIC@state.gov
    Hours (except on Federal holidays):
    Monday - Friday 8am - 10pm (Eastern Time)
    Saturday: 10am - 3pm (Eastern Time)
    * Automated passport information is available 24 hours a day, 7 days per week

    Should I apply in person or via mail?

    It is possible to apply for your passport both in person and via mail, however, depending on your circumstances, you may be required to apply in person. Visit the State Department’s Passport Acceptance Facility Finder at https://iafdb.travel.state.gov/ to find an office near you. When applying by mail, you will be required to send original identifying documents to the applicable office, which means that you, yourself, will not have access to those documents until the office returns them to you. As a result, it may be in your best interest to apply in person even though you may be eligible to renew your passport by mail.

    You must apply for a passport in person if:
    • You are applying for your first U.S. passport
    • Your previous U.S. passport was issued when you were under age 16
    • Your previous U.S. passport was lost, stolen, or damaged
    • Your previous U.S. passport was issued more than 15 years ago
    You are eligible to renew your passport by mail if you do not fall into one of the categories listed above and your most recent passport:
    • Is submitted with your application
    • Is undamaged
    • Was issued when you were age 16 or older
    • Was issued within the last 15 years
    • Was issued in your current name (or you can document your name change with an original or certified copy of your marriage certificate, divorce decree, or court order)
    What documents will I need to apply for a Passport for the first time?

    To obtain your Passport, you must provide:

    1. A completed U.S. Passport Application, Form DS-11 (https://eforms.state.gov/Forms/ds11.pdf)
    2. Proof of U.S. Citizenship
      • Certified birth certificate
      • Consular Report of Birth Abroad or Certification of Birth
      • Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship
      • See page 2 of the U.S. Passport Application for a list of documents required if no birth record exists, you claim citizenship through naturalization of parent(s), or if you claim citizenship through adoption by a U.S. citizen parent(s).
    3. Bring a photocopy of your proof of U.S. Citizenship
      • Photocopy must be: legible, on white 8.5”x11” standard paper, black and white, single-sided
    4. Proof of Identity
      • Previous or current U.S. passport book or card
      • Driver’s license (cannot be a temporary or learner’s license)
      • Certificate of Naturalization
      • Certificate of Citizenship
      • Military identification
      • Federal, state or municipal government employee identification card
    5. Bring a photocopy of your proof of identity
      • Photocopy must be: legible, on white 8.5”x11” standard paper, black and white, single-sided
    6. A recent, color photograph
      • Must be a sufficiently recent photograph (taken within the last 6 months)
      • Must be 2x2 inches in size
      • The photo must be in color, clear, with a full front view of your face
      • Headphones, glasses and headwear is generally not permitted
      • See https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/passports/photos.html for more information about passport photo requirements
    7. Fees (as of June 2017)
      • Adult First-Time Applicants: $110 Application Fee + $25 Execution Fee
      • Expedited Services: $60
      • Overnight Delivery Service: $15.45
    How do I renew my passport?

    To renew your Passport, you must provide:

    1. A completed U.S. Passport Renewal Application, Form DS-82 (https://eforms.state.gov/Forms/ds82.pdf)
    2. Your most recent U.S. passport
    3. If your name has changed, provide a certified copy of your marriage certificate or court order (photocopies are not accepted)
    4. A recent, color photograph
      • Must be a sufficiently recent photograph (taken within the last 6 months)
      • Must be 2x2 inches in size
      • The photo must be in color, clear, with a full front view of your face
      • Headphones, glasses and headwear is generally not permitted
      • See https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/passports/photos.html for more information about passport photo requirements
    5. Fees (as of June 2017)
      • Adult Renewal Applicants: $110 Application Fee
      • Expedited Services: $60
      • Overnight Delivery Service: $15.45
    My name changed within one year of my passport being issued, what do I do?

    To change the name in your passport:

    1. A completed U.S. Passport Renewal Application, Form DS-82 (https://eforms.state.gov/Forms/ds82.pdf)
    2. Your most recent U.S. passport
    3. If your name has changed, provide a certified copy of your marriage certificate or court order (photocopies are not accepted)
    4. A recent, color photograph
      • Must be a sufficiently recent photograph (taken within the last 6 months)
      • Must be 2x2 inches in size
      • The photo must be in color, clear, with a full front view of your face
      • Headphones, glasses and headwear is generally not permitted
      • See https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/passports/photos.html for more information about passport photo requirements
    5. Fees
      • Adult Renewal Applicants: $0-$165 (Varies)
      • Expedited Services: $60
      • Overnight Delivery Service: $15.45
    I received my Passport, but some of my identifying information was printed incorrectly, what do I do?

    To correct information on your passport, you must:

    1. Complete Application for A U.S. Passport for corrections, name change  within 1 year of Passport Issuance, and limited passport holders, Form DS-5504 (https://eforms.state.gov/Forms/ds5504.pdf)
    2. Provide a recent color photograph
    3. Evidence of identity (can be established by state driver license or identification)  

    * There is no fee associated with this form unless you are requesting expedited service

    I see that I’m required to provide a photograph of myself in order to get a Passport, how do I go about getting a satisfactory picture?  

    Many passport issuing offices also offer a photograph service either in the facility or nearby. Visit the State Department’s Passport Acceptance Facility Finder at https://iafdb.travel.state.gov/ for locations and information on what services are provided at the location near you. Be prepared to pay the associated fee for a passport photograph, most often these fees will range between $5-$15, but it is advised to contact the location you plan to visit for specific cost information.

    Tribal Identification

    What is a tribal ID and, if eligible, why should I get one?

    If obtained from a federally recognized tribe either in Oregon or affiliated with Oregon (see list below), tribal identification can serve as a form of identification for state purposes as well. If you are eligible for enrollment in a federally recognized tribe, you will likely be qualified to receive certain benefits and services through your tribe that are provided or funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

    Federally recognized, or confederated tribes, in Oregon:
    • Burns Paiute Tribe
    • Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians of Oregon
    • Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation
    • Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
    • Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon
    • Coquille Indian Tribe
    • Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians
    • Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation
    • Klamath Tribes
    How do I find out if I’m eligible for a tribal ID?

    Because every tribe has different enrollment processes and requirements, it is best to contact the tribe that you believe you are affiliated to determine what needs to be done to begin the enrollment process.

    To locate a federally recognized tribe, see the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Tribal Leaders Directory: https://www.bia.gov/tribalmap/DataDotGovSamples/tld_map.html

    Library Card

    What is a library card and why should I have one?

    A library card allows you to access many free resources including books, CDs, DVDs, e-books and the internet. Libraries provide a quiet space to study or relax, at no cost to you. This is a great service to utilize if you are looking for housing, a job, or just hoping to learn more about your areas of interest.

    In addition, access to a library provides you access to the librarians themselves. If you have any questions or if there is a topic you want to research, but you aren’t sure where to start, librarians are there to help you find the information that you need. Do not be afraid to utilize these excellent sources of information!

    How do I get it a library card?

    To obtain a library card, you must be able to present valid photo identification. Libraries will accept state-issued ID, including prison identification, an Oregon identification card and/or an Oregon driver’s license. You will also need to provide an address, but, in most cases, you will not be required to show proof of address.

    What is the Oregon Library Passport Program?

    The Oregon Library Passport Program allows you to access more than 100 participating libraries, even if you live outside their free service area, for limited use. Each library differs in what they allow you to access with an Oregon Library Passport, however a Passport library card will often allow you to check out up to 10 items, access the internet, research tools, books, CDs, DVDs, e-books and more. To register for a Passport library card, all you need to do is show your “home” library card at the participating  library that you wish to access.

    See https://librariesoforegon.org/passport-libraries for a list of participating libraries or contact your local library for more information.

    What is the Metropolitan Interlibrary Exchange?

    If you live in Multnomah, Clackamas, Hood River or Washington county, your local library is a part of the Metropolitan Interlibrary Exchange, which means that you can apply for a free library card at any of the participating libraries. Some Washington state counties, such as Clark, Klickitat and Skamania,  are included in the Metropolitan Interlibrary Exchange as well. Specific libraries in Cowlitz County, Washington participate as well.

    Register to Vote

    Why should I register to vote?

    Registering to vote allows you to participate in local, state and federal elections. When you vote, you are ensuring  that your voice and your opinion is heard. Many issues at stake in local, state and federal elections have the capacity to directly affect you, so it is critical that you make your opinion known so that you do not risk others making important decisions for you.

    Am I eligible?

    To be register to vote in Oregon, you must be at least 17 years old, a U.S. citizen and an Oregon resident. If you have been convicted of a felony, you are not eligible to vote while you are incarcerated. Once you are no longer incarcerated, your voting rights are automatically restored and you are eligible to re-register to vote. If you have been convicted of a misdemeanor, your eligibility has not been affected so long as you are not serving in an Oregon federal correctional facility. Those who are in an Oregon federal correctional facility are not eligible to vote or register to vote until released.

    How do I register to vote?

    There are four ways to register to vote:

    1. Online
    2. By Mail
      • Mail a completed Oregon Voter Registration Card (Form SEL 500) to your local County Elections office (offices are listed on the form). An Oregon Voter Registration Card can be found at: http://sos.oregon.gov/elections/Documents/SEL500.pdf
      • If you are registering to vote for the first time, you will be required to include a copy of valid ID. Acceptable ID includes: valid state identification (including driver’s license), a paycheck stub that includes both your name and address, a utility bill that includes both your name and address, a  bank statement that includes both your name and address or a government document that includes both your name and address.
    3. In Person
    4. You may also register to vote at the Oregon DMV while applying for a driver’s license or vehicle registration
    Any Questions?

    If you have any questions about voter registration, or voting in general, contact:
    Oregon Elections Division
    (503) 986-1518
    TTY: (800) 735-2900
    E-mail: elections.sos@state.or.us

    Selective Service Registration

    What is it?

    According to the Military Selective Service Act, all men in the United States, ages 18 through 25, must register themselves with the federal government in the event of a military draft. The purpose of the federal law is to ensure a fair draft selection process. Keep in mind that there has not been a draft since 1973 and the likelihood of a draft occurring again is slim, however, registering is still the law and there are very real penalties for failing to do so.

    Who is required to register for selective service?

    Unless an exception applies, any man ages 18 through 25 is required by law to register. This includes non-citizens and dual-citizens.

    If you were incarcerated from 30 days before your 18th birthday through the age of 25, you be exempt from Selective Service registration. If you were released for any period longer than 30 days during the ages of 18 to 25, then you were required to register. For Selective Service to honor your exemption, you must be able to provide documentation that supports you were incarcerated during that time.

    See the link for a chart created by the U.S. Government Selective Service System website that details who must register and the potential exceptions: https://www.sss.gov/Portals/0/PDFs/WhoMustRegisterChart.pdf

    How do I register for selective service?

    To register, you will need to know your Social Security number. The required forms are available at any U.S. Post Office. Selective Service may also send you a mail-back card, which you can fill out and return to Selective Service directly. 

    Why should I register? What penalties am I facing if I don’t?

    Failure to register is a felony that is punishable by a fine of up to $250,000, a maximum 5-year prison term, or a combination of the two. If you failed to register after receiving a reminder or compliance mailing from Selective Service, you name is referred to the Department of Justice for potential investigation or prosecution.

    In addition to  the potential legal consequences discussed above, there may be state legislation or violations that apply. Currently, Oregon does not have any Selective Service-specific legislation, however that is subject to change and many other states do. Be sure to check sss.gov for any changes.

  • County Resources

Criminal Justice Reform Clinic (CJRC)

Contact Us

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    Criminal Justice Reform Clinic (CJRC) is located in Wood Hall on the Law Campus.

    Professor Aliza Kaplan
    Director
    akaplan@lclark.edu
    503-768-6721

    • Criminal Justice Reform Clinic (CJRC) Lewis & Clark Law School 10015 S.W. Terwilliger BoulevardMSC 51 Portland OR 97219