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Law Courses Catalog

Forest Law and Policy

NOTE: This course description is new for the 2016-2017 academic year. You may read the prior course description immediately below this new one. 

2016-2017

Public and private forest lands have long been one of our most treasured natural resources. Forests provide clean water and air, habitat for a diverse array of flora and fauna, recreational opportunities, wood fiber, and other products for human and non-human use. Decisions on how to prioritize among these amenities involve hotly debated scientific principles and often provoke a debate that can cause deep divisions among people. These issues play out at local, state, and national levels among an array of public, private, and governmental interests and entities.

This class will provide an initial historical, legal, and policy framework for the debate surrounding our national forest heritage as well as state and private lands. Discussions with conservation groups, attorneys, community foresters, congressional staff, industry representatives, members of the media, agency personnel, and/or political appointees will help participants fully understand the many aspects of modern forest management. Students will be evaluated based on two written assignments as well as regular and robust class participation.

This class will fulfill the “WIE” writing requirement.

NOTE: The below course description applied prior to the 2016-2017 academic year.

Description: Public and private forest lands have long been one of our most treasured natural resources. Forests provide clean water and air, habitat for a diverse array of flora and fauna, recreational opportunities, wood fiber, and other products for human and non-human use. Decisions on how to prioritize among these amenities involve hotly debated scientific principles and often provoke a debate that can cause deep divisions among people. These issues play out at local, state, and national levels among an array of public, private, and governmental interests and entities.

First, this class will provide an initial historical, legal, and policy framework for the debate surrounding our national forest heritage as well as state and private lands. Discussions with conservation groups, attorneys, community foresters, congressional staff, industry representatives, members of the media, agency personnel, and/or political appointees will help participants fully understand the many aspects of modern forest management. Second, students will participate in a semester-long simulation of real-world situations that will require students to draw on lectures, the law, and policy choices in order to complete three short, written assignments. This class will fulfill the “WIE” writing requirement.

Meets WIE writing requirement.