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National Crime Victim Law Institute

Staff Profile: Desiree Staeffler-Marchbanks

September 07, 2018

  • Desiree Staeffler-Marchbanks, J.D.
    Desiree Staeffler-Marchbanks, J.D.

Desiree Staeffler-Marchbanks, J.D., joined NCVLI in May 2018 as a National Crime Victim Law Fellow.  View Desiree’s biography on our Staff Page or read on to learn more about Desiree in her own words. 

When someone asks you what NCVLI does, what do you tell them? 

I explain that NCVLI is a nonprofit dedicated to helping people who have been victimized.  NCVLI ensures victims’ rights are recognized, protected and given the full meaning of the law.  When practitioners and/or advocates need assistance with victims’ rights issues, including novel issues, NCVLI serves as the intellectual think tank, providing, inter alia, specialized knowledge and innovative approaches to the criminal justice system and other platforms.  NCVLI is passionate, bold and not afraid to leave a footprint. 

What inspires or motivates you? 

I am motivated by the victims/survivors we serve.  Throughout my career, when I have had the privilege of learning about survivors’ experiences, it has deeply motivated me to fight for justice as well as their rights and a sense of empowerment. 

I am inspired by my co-workers at NCVLI.  I am honored to work with genuine, highly intelligent public servants who take their mission seriously (while not taking themselves too seriously).  I love coming to work and being able to advocate for such a worthy cause while working alongside passionate and humorous co-workers. 

What are your hobbies?  

My newest hobby is exploring Portland’s greenery, nearby mountains, restaurants (yum!) and bookstores!  When I am not out exploring or spending time with loved ones, I enjoy running, yoga, cooking vegetarian meals and reading books that teach me about the world, history or people’s lives. 

Why should someone else get involved with NCVLI and victims’ rights? 

Someone should become involved with NCVLI or victims’ rights because protecting the safety and dignity of a victim is a foundation to a victim having a meaningful role in the criminal justice system.